1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    XC Hack
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    What is a "manual"?

    Is that even the correct term? I heard it in both an mtb video about a rhythm section and also in a MX vid. What's involved in doing it and when/why does a rider do it? Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    MTB ESSENTIAL TECHNIQUES 07 The Manual - YouTube

    It's basically a wheelie where you're coasting rather than sat in the seat pedaling.

    I found the easiest way to learn it was to find some gradually descending grass slope and practice the technique to get the wheel in the air - what happens is once you get the technique you tend to over do it and fall off the back of the bike (called a loop out) and grass is softer than concrete when you end up on your ass, after you have the technique it is just a matter of getting the balance correct and coordination with the rear braking.
    It is pretty useful cos it is basically the first half of the bunny hop technique.

    If you are running clipless pedals; put flats on to practice this is my advice

  3. #3
    T.W.O.
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    3 basic front wheel lofts are
    wheelies- pedal and seated
    coast wheelie- seated but not padaling
    manual- stand and loft the front wheel

    Manual is definitely very useful and it's the one that you can use the most out of the trail. You don't need to sustain one for seconds or minutes just a brief moment to put your front wheel up or over obstacle(s) preserving momentum. It's more of push out and not pull up move. Basically, you just want to move your A$$ over the bottom bracket, believe me it's much further back than you think.

    SimpleJon gave you a good practice routine already, start there.

  4. #4
    Rod
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    You already have very good advice here. Follow the advice of ^^ those guys.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

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