1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    What have I gotten into?

    My uncle has been into the sport for years and I would think hardcore by most anyone’s standards. I have been looking into getting a new “real” bike to get into the sport and I thought what better place to start than some of his old ones. One thing let to another and I was given a Raleigh M80 Al. 7005 Series for Christmas. Now that its summer time I have gotten it out and started riding.

    I don’t know much about the bike other than what little I can find with google. Some of the components it has are different than the ones listed on websites however. The components are as fallows:
    • Rock Shox Indy S fork
    • Shimano stxRC HB-MC33 front hub
    • Shimano stxRC FH-MC28A rear hub
    • Weinmann ZAC19 rims
    • TekTRO (v-brakes I think that’s the type they are, front and rear)
    • Sram twist shifters
    • Bontrager saddle (free gift to myself from my ex-girlfriends dad…haha , idk what model)
    • Shimano STX peddle arm things (idk the correct name of component)
    • Shimano STX shifting mechanisms
    • iRC Piranhapro 2.00 tires



    So I’m looking for some advice on what components to upgrade. My @ss hurts like a mofo but I think that is b/c I have a bony ass and it’s not used to it yet. I would like to redo the entire handlebar set up (rise bars, no bar ends like it has, and no twist type shifters, and d@mn!t the grips destroy my hands even with gloves on!). I am also able to bottom out the front forks rather easily with my massive 150lbm 5’8” body so I am guessing it would be a good idea to upgrade it as wall. Maybe some Avid B77 for kicks and giggles.

    Anyhow, any info., suggestions, or opinions would be greatly appertained.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    I wouldn't upgrade anything,those components were decent in the day and it looks like a nice ride.I had a used bike last year that had some STX and STX-RC components and they worked well,I think they were on the Deore/LX level.Just ride it,have fun and if you feel you need more save up for a new bike!If you want to replace the forks look at the Dart 3's,they are pretty nice and cheap.

  3. #3
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    If your uncle is a mountain biker, have him help you set up your cockpit, to get you in the proper position. That stem looks long, which would put you too stretched out, causing pain in your ass.

    Get rid of the pedals, and get clipless or platforms. The correct stem and riser bars should help you get in position.

    As far as everything else component wise, I would leave, except maybe the tires. Then go ride. Ride with your uncle, join a group ride through a LBS or bike club, just put time in on your bike. While you are aquiring the basic bike handling skills, start saving money. People are going to tell you to change your fork, change this, change that. Just ride and save money. If you stick with it, you will know when your skills progress past the limitations of your current bike. At that time, come back here and 50 different people will tell you which bike is best for you. Hopefully, you will have somewhat of an idea of what you believe may work for your type and style of riding.

    I forgot: Try to borrow as many bikes as possible before you even think of getting another bike. Thats where the group rides come in. If you don't experience as many types of bikes, how will you be able to make an informed buying decision? You will then join the "What bike is best for me?" club. Believe me, you don't want to be a member of that club. Now go ride!
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  4. #4
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    Do what BoulderPilot suggests.

    Your bike looks like what I started out on, before DH bikes were invented. I used to have a speedometer on that ol' bike, and I would clock 70 KMPH on rugged downhills. I don't go any faster on my dreamy 7" FR bike than I used to on the big hardtail, although I can stop a little better now!

    It's not the bike, it's how you ride it. Ever seen someone do trials riding over a park bench on a supermarket-quality road racing bike? Or a drunk dude at the pub get on a ladies bike and one-handed mono up a steep hill? I have. It humbled me forever.

    Now turn off your computer and go ride your bike alone for a few years as hard as you can for your own good and don't listen to anyone but your subconscious. Wear a helmet always.
    Quote Originally Posted by dowst
    Next time you want to post worthless, stupid sh*t like this, go here:

    www.pinkbike.com

  5. #5
    Cheezy Rider
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    The bike is nothing to write home about but it is certainly trail-worthy, and looks nice too. Forget about disks, you'll need new wheels and that frame doesn't have mounts for the rear. Looks like the fork doesn't have mounts either. And honestly V-brakes, even Tektros, should do a fine job at stopping your 150 pounds. Might consider new pads, they degrade when they get old.

    Your butt may toughen up after a few rides, but if not spring for a new seat, there's tons of good ones. Maybe new grips too. And brake cables. If it's shifting OK I wouldn't mess with the shift cables. You should be able to have a lot of fun on that bike, ride it hard!

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the input guys! I'm glad to hear that I have a descent peace of machinery.

    As far as shifting goes, are there any threads that explain what a good shift is and what it should feel like? Right now it shifts into every gear with no problem but it seems as if it could do so much smoother and with less "slop" between gears.

  7. #7
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    Go to:http://parktool.com

    Excellent info on how to work on your bike. Working on your bike will teach you how things should be set-up, and will also save you hundreds of dollars, money that you can use towards the purchase of another bike down the road.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

  8. #8
    Bikecurious
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    Might try changing the angle of the seat a bit. Looks like it's pretty level, if not pointed up a tad. Try dropping the nose of the saddle a few degrees, or possibly sliding the saddle forward some. It should at least help the chode soreness. As for adding disc brakes, as was mentioned earlier, it doesn't look like you have the mounts for them. And V-brakes do a pretty good job. A lot of people prefer them over discs. In my experience you can lock up the V-brakes easier, but discs are a little smoother at stopping. Just depends what kind of riding you are into.

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    Ride it.

    New grips don't exactly cost a fortune. I do not like those pedals. For trails riding, at least remove the cages. See if you get used to the seat. Tiny changes in seat angle can make a huge difference, if the seat puts pressure where you don't want it.

  10. #10
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    You don't need to upgrade, just ride. You are bottoming out your fork because of bad technique. Try to be light on the front end over roots and rocks. You would learn a lot on a rigid bike because of the instant "feedback" (meaning if you don't ride right it will beat the crap out of you). I had a bike with grip shifters and slid them in so that I could use full width grips. That made technical trails easier because I wasn't inadvertantly shifting. Do't worry if it doesn't seem to shift crisply, you need to let up on the pedals when shifting for it to be smooth. Most people shift too much anyway, select your gear before you get to a hill or obstical and just worry about riding. Lastly, you don't need disk brakes unless you are riding somewhere that involves a lift ride to the top.

  11. #11
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    If your really keen on upgrading i would get a dart 3 fork and maybe a shock post for your butt but i think what you are experiencing is the sit all the time on the trail syndrome... IE over rocks and bumps stand so all the shock does go into your butt. that is a nice bike for what it is though enjoy it.
    Keep on Ridin

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