1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    What do you all think of these items I'll be buying for my new bike?

    I plan to buy all these things:

    Amazon.com: Topeak Aero Wedge Pack: Sports & Outdoors - saddle bag medium
    Amazon.com: Planet Bike 3018-1 Rack Blinky 5- 5 LED Tail Light with Rack Mount and Batteries: Sports & Outdoors - rear bicycle tailight
    Amazon.com: Cateye HL-EL135N Bicycle Head Light: Sports & Outdoors - front bicycle headlight
    Amazon.com: Topeak Alien II 26-Function Bicycle Tool: Sports & Outdoors - multi-tool
    Amazon.com: Klean Kanteen Stainless Steel Water Bottle: Sports & Outdoors - 18oz Loop Cap. Stainless steel so paint does not wear off.
    Amazon.com: Topeak Modula Waterbottle Cage 2: Sports & Outdoors - Waterbottle cage
    Topeak Pocket Rocket Master Blaster Bike Pump: Amazon.com: Sports & Outdoors - mini hand pump
    Tri Flow Teflon Bicycle Lube 2oz. Drip: Amazon.com: Sports & Outdoors - chain lube
    Amazon.com: Giro Rift Bike Helmet: Sports & Outdoors - Giro rift helmet

    I need a replacement tube but need to find the right size for my Giant Escape 1.

    What do you all think? Should be all I need?

    thanks a lot

    and I'm buying a floor pump with gauge at the Target tonight I might buy this bike computer too...
    Amazon.com: Bell F12 Bike Computer: Sports & Outdoors

  2. #2
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    Depending on where and when you ride you might not need the lights. You might want get some tire levers and a patch kit. Gloves and glass wouldn't hurt also. I've always used plastic bottles , stainless seams a little overkill to me . Some kind of back/water pack could fit all of your stuff plus have room for more.

  3. #3
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    As far as the tube goes you'll probably need the 700x32 tube (some manufacturers may list this as a 700x28-36) as well.

    You can verify the size of the tire by looking on the sidewall.

    The Bell F12 is a nice no frills but solid unit. Mine have taken a lot of abuse.

    DC

  4. #4
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    I prefer the Cateye lights front and rear. They seemed brighter compared to the alternatives:
    Cateye combo light set

    As long as you know the helmet fits your head and you like the way it looks on you, then go for it. Generally, helmets should be purchased in person--not online--since the models all look and feel just a little different. In the end, it'll save you time to at least try them before buying.

    The steel bottle sounds smart but do you need to pull over every time you want a drink? Plastic CamelBaks are squeezable and have a non-spill spout. You simly pull it out, tip and squeeze.

    Love the TriFlow Teflon.

    Personally, I go with the smallest mutli-tool + chain tool + plastic tire levers + spare tube in a small bag. I like to travel light.
    Amazon.com: Topeak The Mini 9-Function Bicycle Tool: Sports & Outdoors

    But I think you've got all the essentials. Protecive eyewear, as suggested, is always a good idea. Check the lawn & garden section of your local hardware store for some surprisingly cool options for cheap.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  5. #5
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    You may want a 24 oz water bottle rather than 18 oz. I sure do, but I drink water like a...something that drinks a ton of water.

  6. #6
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    I'd buy one of those other waterbottles but I hate that they can't be washed in a dishwasher. Klean Kanteen looks pretty awesome. I might just go with clear plastic waterbottles for now.

  7. #7
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    You can put the CamelBak Podium bottles in the dishwasher (see the "CARE" tab on the linked page). They also have a narrower "neck" section which keeps it secure in the cage. Something to keep in mind if you're planning on some serious off-roading.

    CamelBak | PODIUM SPORT BOTTLE 24oz Self-Sealing with High Flow Rate
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  8. #8
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    I prefer the Topeak Survival Gearbox to the multitool because the individual tools are easier to work with when they aren't all attached like that.
    Last edited by MoTec; 08-10-2012 at 04:20 PM. Reason: added link

  9. #9
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    I like polar water bottles they are well insulated and a nice size. Also for the bottle cage the topeak is heavy, you shouldn't use an adjustable one to house a water bottle. I like the side pull cages that specialized makes, easy out and back in.
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