1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 50
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44

    What do you all do to your bike after a muddy and wet run?

    I just bought my bike today, and took it out for a spin. It was real muddy and wet, so at the end of the day my bike was covered in mud and grass.

    What are the basics that I need to make sure I do to clean it? I don't have time to spot clean it to a sparkly shine, but I want to do what I need to do so that my bike will last longer.

    For example, do I need to spray it down? Is it mandatory to dry it? Touch the chain/shocks? Etc...

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,297
    DO NOT HOSE IT DOWN
    Don't soak the BB, bearings, or mostly anything that moves; if you're not going to dry them and regrease them later. I usually remove most of the the dirt from my bike with a cloth, and use the hose on it when it's extremely muddy.

  3. #3
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    Endorphin Junkie
    Reputation: Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,012
    If it's extremely muddy I use the hose on it, but I don't spray it directly on the bearings. If it's just a little bit of mud I don't worry about it. If I hose down my bike I usually dry it with a towel. After hosing off the chain make sure to oil it.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  4. #4
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,123
    Quote Originally Posted by Garlock
    DO NOT HOSE IT DOWN
    Don't soak the BB, bearings, or mostly anything that moves; if you're not going to dry them and regrease them later. I usually remove most of the the dirt from my bike with a cloth, and use the hose on it when it's extremely muddy.
    There is nothing wrong with using a hose to clean the mud off of the tires, wheels, down tube... but as others have mentioned, you should try to avoid pointing high pressure water at the important bearings like bottom bracket.

    Be sure to wipe down, and re-lube your chain. Remove build up on cogs, chainrings, and derailleur pulleys.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    what about the fork?

    also, as far as lubing the chain -- will wd40 work?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    497
    Quote Originally Posted by oliveryou
    what about the fork?

    also, as far as lubing the chain -- will wd40 work?

    WD-40 is NOT a chain lube. Go to your LBS and pick up some bike specific lube.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,530
    WD-40 is not a lube, therefore should not be used to lube a chain. WD-40 is a Water-Dispersant (useless info - water displacement: 40th try) You'll want to get a chain lube. The best kind depends on the conditions you ride in. If it is dry and dusty, a dry wax lube will be fine. If you ride in wet conditions, you'll want a regular lube. I'd ask local riders what kind they use. To clean the chain, I just wipe it down with a cloth, if it is really muddy, then I take it off and use some mineral spirits, then relube. Should you use a water based degreaser, take care to get the chain dry when you're done. You'll be surprised how quickly rust will develop.

    The fork just needs to be wiped down with a cloth. There's rubber gaskets and dust wipers where the stanchions enter the fork lowers. Inside the assembly there is a sponge soaked with oil which keeps the fork lubed. It is important to keep the stanchions fairly well clean, you don't want dirt to work its way into the fork lowers. These can be serviced easily by yourself, but you won't need to worry about that so soon. Just keep the fork wiped down and you'll be alright.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    do i need to lube the cassette as well? as far as the derailers, i can just get a brush and remove all the dirt, right?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,530
    You you can just get a brush and remove all the dirt from the cassette and dérailleurs. And old tooth brush work perfect.

    There's no need to lube the cassette. If using wet lube, once the chain is dry, put one small drop on each roller along the top side of the bottom loop of the chain. Let it stand for a few minutes, then wipe off any excess lube with a clean towel. Run the pedals backwards a few times. Enough lube will drip off the chain to lube up the cassette.

    The sticky at the top of the this page has good instructions for maintaining a drivetrain.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    here's my bike after riding today -- all i did today was wash it down with a water hose (no pressure) and pulled off most of the grass. it's pretty late right now, but i will wake up in the morning to clean the moving parts and lube them.







  11. #11
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,092
    Quote Originally Posted by emtnate
    There's no need to lube the cassette. If using wet lube, once the chain is dry, put one small drop on each roller along the top side of the bottom loop of the chain. Let it stand for a few minutes, then wipe off any excess lube with a clean towel. Run the pedals backwards a few times. Enough lube will drip off the chain to lube up the cassette.

    The sticky at the top of the this page has good instructions for maintaining a drivetrain.

    Agreed...However be careful about only leaving the lube on for a few minutes. Some lubes require overnight to dry. The lube i use takes a couple hours. Follow the directions on the bottle.

  12. #12
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,685
    dont listen to the "DONT WASH "your bike idiots
    dont you think that enough water and dirt got into all those places from riding?
    there is nothing on a bike that cant be washed, just like a car or motorcycle.
    dont blow high pressure water (i.e. pressure washer, or car wash wand ) at the bearings or pivots, you can get them wet and soapy but not high pressure, you dont want to blow water past the seals
    I usually wash & rinse while its still wet and muddy, everything comes off easier while wet
    Ive seen people take a brush or rag and scrub off the dried mud
    not good, think about it, dry dirt and grit on the paint and caked to the oil and grease , now scrub and wipe it around= scratched paint and grit in the bearings and seals, chains, etc. would you brush & wipe the dried mud off a car or motorcycle? no way
    car wash 101, wet the car first to loosen up the dirt and rinse off as much as possible

    once you have rinsed and washed the bike , bounce it a couple of times and towell dry
    then , if the chain is clean 1 drop of chain lube on each roller, let sit for a few minutes then wipe off as much as possible , you only need chain lube inside the rollers, any on the exterior will collect dirt, the cassette needs no lube whatsoever, are there any moving parts on a cassette? no, so no lube. The bearings and pivots are sealed and also require no lube, in fact most of the bearings and pivots on a bike require no lube as they are all sealed and packed with grease , in fact lubing the pivots will make them wear out faster

    check out the cleaning and maintenance sticky at the top of this section

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    46
    I was thinking about the "don't use a hose" advice when I was recently in Downieville. Pretty much every rider who came off the trail rode straight to the bike stand/hose with spray nozzle behind YE and hosed off their bikes.

    I always use a hose and towel dry. If this is bad for my bike and parts rust, then I will just replace them. I'm sure I will break them from being a crappy rider before that happens anyhow.

  14. #14
    My bike is cooler then me
    Reputation: Codad 4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    dont listen to the "DONT WASH "your bike idiots
    +1 on that. i washed my full rig (fork and rear shock, DT and BB as well) with a hose, not at high pressure but with my thumb over the nozzel for about a year before i read anything about not spraying your rig down... so far its fine.

    ps when you wash it make sure to check and see if the water (and any mud on the inside) is draining out of the frame. my frame (which is not like yours at all ) has a few spots where i have to tilt the frame back and forth to work the water out. the only thing the water sitting there will do is start to work away your bottom braket and what not from the inside out not good.

    shiny bikes are fun bikes
    '09 Cannondale Moto Carbon 2

    'is that a Thomson in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?'

  15. #15
    My bike is cooler then me
    Reputation: Codad 4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by thepaul
    I was thinking about the "don't use a hose" advice when I was recently in Downieville. Pretty much every rider who came off the trail rode straight to the bike stand/hose with spray nozzle behind YE and hosed off their bikes.

    yeah the DH park i went to in PA had a big long ten bike hang and wash... with a hose... there too... and there were even people with 4 and 5K bikes just hoseing away
    '09 Cannondale Moto Carbon 2

    'is that a Thomson in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?'

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,530
    I wash my bike with a hose without any pressure when it's too dirty, never had any problems so long as I dry the chain right away. It's a good idea to take the seat post out and turn the bike upside down to let any water out.

  17. #17
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,480
    Add another supporter for Dan0's advice.

    When I had a hose, I would simply let water splash adjacently onto the moving parts, from say, the downtube onto the BB area.

    Now I live in a city, so I'm using one of those 5 liter garden sprayers. Have to see how it works out.

    Time for some dirt porn:






  18. #18
    Pedaler of dirt
    Reputation: marzjennings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    903
    When I get home after a muddy ride both me and the bike get hosed off in the front yard. The wife won't let me in the house until I'm semi clean.

    After the bike is hosed off, I'll displace the water on the drive train with wd40, let it dry off and then lube up before my next ride.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    crap! obviously, since i am a noob, after riding in the rain/mud i ONLY washed off my bike but since it was late and i was exhausted, i didn't dry off the chain and lube it. i woke up this morning to a rusty chain.

    this bike is brand spankin new, i took out the bike to make sure the chain wasn't jammed and still moving -- it works great but i am sure it is better for me to clean off the rust rather than "ride" it off like some have suggested.

    what is the easiest way to remove rust and clean my chain without having to take the chain off and all that mumbo jumbo? i am going to the LBS to buy some cleaners/lube -- any suggestions would be great!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,530
    Told you you'd be surprised how quickly they rust Don't worry, it's most likely just a little bit of surface rust. If it doesn't scrub off easily with a brush, take it off using the powerlink and try a solvent. WD-40 might work in this case, just don't forget to relube once it is dry.

    Is that a 2009 rockhopper? If it has a KMC chain like my 08 did, you'll find a powerlink somewhere on the chain. It's easy to take the chain on and off with these once you learn the trick to open it.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    6
    Yeah, second what emtnate said. A little surface rust is no big deal. It usually comes off just by wiping it with the rag after lubing the links.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Garlock
    DO NOT HOSE IT DOWN
    ... use the hose on it when it's extremely muddy.
    Thanks for clarifying.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    It's like washing a car. Sponges, brushes, with plenty of suds, won't hurt anything. Just use common sense: no high pressure at the wheel hubs or crank hub. I also try to keep water out of the shifters and cable casings. Just look at how stuff works. You'll know where water should and shouldn't go.

    As far as the chain goes, folks will be debating this 'til the end of time. Replace it every 1000 miles +/-, depending on how much dirt works it's way in (they're pretty cheap), and you'll save wear and tear on your gears (expensive bits). Too little lube, and it'll squeak like hell and get rusty. Too much and you'll attract dirt and accelerate wear and tear. Keep an eye on it and find a happy balance. Common sense will do you fine.

    Oh yeah, if you have rim brakes, clean the rims from time to time with some steel wool. I like scrubbing the faces of the brake pads as well, although they sometimes squeal a bit afterward, until they start to wear again (just a few miles is all).

  24. #24
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,685
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Add another supporter for Dan0's advice.

    When I had a hose, I would simply let water splash adjacently onto the moving parts, from say, the downtube onto the BB area.

    Now I live in a city, so I'm using one of those 5 liter garden sprayers. Have to see how it works out.

    Time for some dirt porn:






    I nominate Jerk Chicken for the muddiest bike of the year award

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,600
    so according to most people on this thread mud, water, dirt, soap or anything should never touch your bike?

    wake up....if your bike is dirty hose it down with a low pressure hose, dry it off and re-lube/grease the necesary parts.

    i've cleaned every bike i've ever owned this way and have never had an issue
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er
    2011 Yeti 303R DH
    2012 Banshee Spitfire V1.5

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •