Results 1 to 50 of 50
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44

    What do you all do to your bike after a muddy and wet run?

    I just bought my bike today, and took it out for a spin. It was real muddy and wet, so at the end of the day my bike was covered in mud and grass.

    What are the basics that I need to make sure I do to clean it? I don't have time to spot clean it to a sparkly shine, but I want to do what I need to do so that my bike will last longer.

    For example, do I need to spray it down? Is it mandatory to dry it? Touch the chain/shocks? Etc...

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,296
    DO NOT HOSE IT DOWN
    Don't soak the BB, bearings, or mostly anything that moves; if you're not going to dry them and regrease them later. I usually remove most of the the dirt from my bike with a cloth, and use the hose on it when it's extremely muddy.

  3. #3
    Rod
    Rod is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,800
    If it's extremely muddy I use the hose on it, but I don't spray it directly on the bearings. If it's just a little bit of mud I don't worry about it. If I hose down my bike I usually dry it with a towel. After hosing off the chain make sure to oil it.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  4. #4
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,121
    Quote Originally Posted by Garlock
    DO NOT HOSE IT DOWN
    Don't soak the BB, bearings, or mostly anything that moves; if you're not going to dry them and regrease them later. I usually remove most of the the dirt from my bike with a cloth, and use the hose on it when it's extremely muddy.
    There is nothing wrong with using a hose to clean the mud off of the tires, wheels, down tube... but as others have mentioned, you should try to avoid pointing high pressure water at the important bearings like bottom bracket.

    Be sure to wipe down, and re-lube your chain. Remove build up on cogs, chainrings, and derailleur pulleys.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    what about the fork?

    also, as far as lubing the chain -- will wd40 work?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    496
    Quote Originally Posted by oliveryou
    what about the fork?

    also, as far as lubing the chain -- will wd40 work?

    WD-40 is NOT a chain lube. Go to your LBS and pick up some bike specific lube.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,529
    WD-40 is not a lube, therefore should not be used to lube a chain. WD-40 is a Water-Dispersant (useless info - water displacement: 40th try) You'll want to get a chain lube. The best kind depends on the conditions you ride in. If it is dry and dusty, a dry wax lube will be fine. If you ride in wet conditions, you'll want a regular lube. I'd ask local riders what kind they use. To clean the chain, I just wipe it down with a cloth, if it is really muddy, then I take it off and use some mineral spirits, then relube. Should you use a water based degreaser, take care to get the chain dry when you're done. You'll be surprised how quickly rust will develop.

    The fork just needs to be wiped down with a cloth. There's rubber gaskets and dust wipers where the stanchions enter the fork lowers. Inside the assembly there is a sponge soaked with oil which keeps the fork lubed. It is important to keep the stanchions fairly well clean, you don't want dirt to work its way into the fork lowers. These can be serviced easily by yourself, but you won't need to worry about that so soon. Just keep the fork wiped down and you'll be alright.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    do i need to lube the cassette as well? as far as the derailers, i can just get a brush and remove all the dirt, right?

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,529
    You you can just get a brush and remove all the dirt from the cassette and dérailleurs. And old tooth brush work perfect.

    There's no need to lube the cassette. If using wet lube, once the chain is dry, put one small drop on each roller along the top side of the bottom loop of the chain. Let it stand for a few minutes, then wipe off any excess lube with a clean towel. Run the pedals backwards a few times. Enough lube will drip off the chain to lube up the cassette.

    The sticky at the top of the this page has good instructions for maintaining a drivetrain.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    here's my bike after riding today -- all i did today was wash it down with a water hose (no pressure) and pulled off most of the grass. it's pretty late right now, but i will wake up in the morning to clean the moving parts and lube them.







  11. #11
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,091
    Quote Originally Posted by emtnate
    There's no need to lube the cassette. If using wet lube, once the chain is dry, put one small drop on each roller along the top side of the bottom loop of the chain. Let it stand for a few minutes, then wipe off any excess lube with a clean towel. Run the pedals backwards a few times. Enough lube will drip off the chain to lube up the cassette.

    The sticky at the top of the this page has good instructions for maintaining a drivetrain.

    Agreed...However be careful about only leaving the lube on for a few minutes. Some lubes require overnight to dry. The lube i use takes a couple hours. Follow the directions on the bottle.

  12. #12
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    dont listen to the "DONT WASH "your bike idiots
    dont you think that enough water and dirt got into all those places from riding?
    there is nothing on a bike that cant be washed, just like a car or motorcycle.
    dont blow high pressure water (i.e. pressure washer, or car wash wand ) at the bearings or pivots, you can get them wet and soapy but not high pressure, you dont want to blow water past the seals
    I usually wash & rinse while its still wet and muddy, everything comes off easier while wet
    Ive seen people take a brush or rag and scrub off the dried mud
    not good, think about it, dry dirt and grit on the paint and caked to the oil and grease , now scrub and wipe it around= scratched paint and grit in the bearings and seals, chains, etc. would you brush & wipe the dried mud off a car or motorcycle? no way
    car wash 101, wet the car first to loosen up the dirt and rinse off as much as possible

    once you have rinsed and washed the bike , bounce it a couple of times and towell dry
    then , if the chain is clean 1 drop of chain lube on each roller, let sit for a few minutes then wipe off as much as possible , you only need chain lube inside the rollers, any on the exterior will collect dirt, the cassette needs no lube whatsoever, are there any moving parts on a cassette? no, so no lube. The bearings and pivots are sealed and also require no lube, in fact most of the bearings and pivots on a bike require no lube as they are all sealed and packed with grease , in fact lubing the pivots will make them wear out faster

    check out the cleaning and maintenance sticky at the top of this section

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    46
    I was thinking about the "don't use a hose" advice when I was recently in Downieville. Pretty much every rider who came off the trail rode straight to the bike stand/hose with spray nozzle behind YE and hosed off their bikes.

    I always use a hose and towel dry. If this is bad for my bike and parts rust, then I will just replace them. I'm sure I will break them from being a crappy rider before that happens anyhow.

  14. #14
    My bike is cooler then me
    Reputation: Codad 4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    dont listen to the "DONT WASH "your bike idiots
    +1 on that. i washed my full rig (fork and rear shock, DT and BB as well) with a hose, not at high pressure but with my thumb over the nozzel for about a year before i read anything about not spraying your rig down... so far its fine.

    ps when you wash it make sure to check and see if the water (and any mud on the inside) is draining out of the frame. my frame (which is not like yours at all ) has a few spots where i have to tilt the frame back and forth to work the water out. the only thing the water sitting there will do is start to work away your bottom braket and what not from the inside out not good.

    shiny bikes are fun bikes
    '09 Cannondale Moto Carbon 2

    'is that a Thomson in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?'

  15. #15
    My bike is cooler then me
    Reputation: Codad 4's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by thepaul
    I was thinking about the "don't use a hose" advice when I was recently in Downieville. Pretty much every rider who came off the trail rode straight to the bike stand/hose with spray nozzle behind YE and hosed off their bikes.

    yeah the DH park i went to in PA had a big long ten bike hang and wash... with a hose... there too... and there were even people with 4 and 5K bikes just hoseing away
    '09 Cannondale Moto Carbon 2

    'is that a Thomson in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me?'

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,529
    I wash my bike with a hose without any pressure when it's too dirty, never had any problems so long as I dry the chain right away. It's a good idea to take the seat post out and turn the bike upside down to let any water out.

  17. #17
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,466
    Add another supporter for Dan0's advice.

    When I had a hose, I would simply let water splash adjacently onto the moving parts, from say, the downtube onto the BB area.

    Now I live in a city, so I'm using one of those 5 liter garden sprayers. Have to see how it works out.

    Time for some dirt porn:






  18. #18
    Pedaler of dirt
    Reputation: marzjennings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    902
    When I get home after a muddy ride both me and the bike get hosed off in the front yard. The wife won't let me in the house until I'm semi clean.

    After the bike is hosed off, I'll displace the water on the drive train with wd40, let it dry off and then lube up before my next ride.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    44
    crap! obviously, since i am a noob, after riding in the rain/mud i ONLY washed off my bike but since it was late and i was exhausted, i didn't dry off the chain and lube it. i woke up this morning to a rusty chain.

    this bike is brand spankin new, i took out the bike to make sure the chain wasn't jammed and still moving -- it works great but i am sure it is better for me to clean off the rust rather than "ride" it off like some have suggested.

    what is the easiest way to remove rust and clean my chain without having to take the chain off and all that mumbo jumbo? i am going to the LBS to buy some cleaners/lube -- any suggestions would be great!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,529
    Told you you'd be surprised how quickly they rust Don't worry, it's most likely just a little bit of surface rust. If it doesn't scrub off easily with a brush, take it off using the powerlink and try a solvent. WD-40 might work in this case, just don't forget to relube once it is dry.

    Is that a 2009 rockhopper? If it has a KMC chain like my 08 did, you'll find a powerlink somewhere on the chain. It's easy to take the chain on and off with these once you learn the trick to open it.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    6
    Yeah, second what emtnate said. A little surface rust is no big deal. It usually comes off just by wiping it with the rag after lubing the links.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Garlock
    DO NOT HOSE IT DOWN
    ... use the hose on it when it's extremely muddy.
    Thanks for clarifying.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    1,062
    It's like washing a car. Sponges, brushes, with plenty of suds, won't hurt anything. Just use common sense: no high pressure at the wheel hubs or crank hub. I also try to keep water out of the shifters and cable casings. Just look at how stuff works. You'll know where water should and shouldn't go.

    As far as the chain goes, folks will be debating this 'til the end of time. Replace it every 1000 miles +/-, depending on how much dirt works it's way in (they're pretty cheap), and you'll save wear and tear on your gears (expensive bits). Too little lube, and it'll squeak like hell and get rusty. Too much and you'll attract dirt and accelerate wear and tear. Keep an eye on it and find a happy balance. Common sense will do you fine.

    Oh yeah, if you have rim brakes, clean the rims from time to time with some steel wool. I like scrubbing the faces of the brake pads as well, although they sometimes squeal a bit afterward, until they start to wear again (just a few miles is all).

  24. #24
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Add another supporter for Dan0's advice.

    When I had a hose, I would simply let water splash adjacently onto the moving parts, from say, the downtube onto the BB area.

    Now I live in a city, so I'm using one of those 5 liter garden sprayers. Have to see how it works out.

    Time for some dirt porn:






    I nominate Jerk Chicken for the muddiest bike of the year award

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,904
    so according to most people on this thread mud, water, dirt, soap or anything should never touch your bike?

    wake up....if your bike is dirty hose it down with a low pressure hose, dry it off and re-lube/grease the necesary parts.

    i've cleaned every bike i've ever owned this way and have never had an issue
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
    2015 Trek Farley 26fat
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er

  26. #26
    Killer b.
    Reputation: The Understater's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,498

    Can I play?

    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    I nominate Jerk Chicken for the muddiest bike of the year award
    I wish to contest this award with some dirt porn of my own. See below.

    For the record, I am one of those who like to put my bike away dirty and then brush the dried dirt off the following day. After 8 years the paint is not noticeably damaged from such treatment. I don't think I have taken to my bike with a towel in over 10 years.
    If it is covered in gunk then it will get hosed and maybe brushed, but I seldom take to it with the suds. Generally after a wet ride I will just lube the chain and wipe off the excess with a rag. This displaces water from inside the rollers, and the rag gets just enough onto the side plates to stop them rusting.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    235
    It doesn't hurt anything to hose off the bike with a hose. I just use my shop vac blower to blow all the water out of the seams and joints of the bike before the water can settle into the lubed areas.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    229
    I like to have a healthy coating of mud on my bike at all times; that way when I take it into the LBS, all of the other noob / poser type riders will be in awe of my out of bounds style. In fact just the other day I overheard some wide eyed noobs say, "dude, that guy must be so hard core, look at all that gnarly mud". I just looked over and gave them my 1000 yard MTB stare, then they really looked scared. Stoopid noobs.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cyrix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    735
    Quote Originally Posted by Codad 4
    yeah the DH park i went to in PA had a big long ten bike hang and wash... with a hose... there too... and there were even people with 4 and 5K bikes just hoseing away
    Where is this DH park you went to in PA? I live east of Pittsburgh in Indiana and have been looking for some good places to ride. I've heard 7 Springs has some good stuff, but that's all as far as a local place goes.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    4
    I have just recently bought a bike and started out lubing the chain with wd40, which I now read I should not use. Can I just wipe off the wd40 and start using a tephlon based lube, or do I need to do a more extensive cleaning on my chain before I switch over?

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,904
    Quote Originally Posted by Good 2 Go
    I have just recently bought a bike and started out lubing the chain with wd40, which I now read I should not use. Can I just wipe off the wd40 and start using a tephlon based lube, or do I need to do a more extensive cleaning on my chain before I switch over?
    WD40 isn't the worst thing you can put on your chain. The problem is it is too thin to be an effective lube. Go to your bike shop buy some degreaser to clean the chain with and get a good all purpose chain lube to apply before every ride.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
    2015 Trek Farley 26fat
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er

  32. #32
    Weekend Warrior
    Reputation: daleksic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,078
    I wash my bike religiously, and then I pray to the Bike Gods...

    I found if I go on a really dirty ride (at least when I expect it), I use a little Pam (yes the cooking spray) down by (not on) the bottom braket, frame, basically everywhere mud get's stuck on but not on parts where lubrication is necessary or where slippery stuff doesn't belong.

    Mud slides right off and while the tires and I look like a pig just had playtime in the mud the bike is clean. When I hose the bike of the pam and all the cr@p comes right off. When I get home I wash my bike "and my chain" to remove any debris left over.

    In regards to WD40, that thing doesn't get anywhere near anything other than rusty bolts. It undergoes and damages Rust, Paint, Stickers, removes good oils and greases. I used to spray my ATV down with WD40 to make the mud go off easier (and it did), and the plastic started to get so soft to a point where it was just drooping over my ATV like a blanket.

    As a basic rule, don't do to your bike you wouldn't do to your brand new Mercedes...

  33. #33
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,466
    I use a "druckspruher" for my cleaning, and today, it worked admirably with the misting nozzle to clean around the fork seals and arch. I was surprised that the mist was able to do so. 5L, plus I have another 5l bottle for when I'm away. I was also surprised at how effective a small amount of water was, so maybe I won't need the extra bottle on trips.


  34. #34
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    WD40 isnt going to damage the chain (its 100% metal) just wipe off the excess and apply a good chain lube. If you ride in dry conditions get a dry lube, wet conditions, a wet lube
    (they are both liquids) put 1 drop on each roller, spin the pedals a few times , wait 10 mins. and wipe off as much as you can.
    you dont want or need lube on the exterior of a chain, nor on the cassette, rings, deraillier( except on the pivot points and idler pulley axles)
    lube on the exterior of these parts just collects dirt and grit

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,529
    Good 2 Go, any WD-40 on your chain will have evaporated fairly quickly. There's probably nothing left to wash off. It's mostly comprised of Stoddard Solvent and a few other ingredients propelled by CO2, not too dissimilar from mineral spirits and mineral oil. Just wipe off the chain and make sure it is clean before applying the teflon lube.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jervana's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    109
    Bonus question for all you muddy dudes: How about doing nothing? I mean, just leaving it muddy. Will that harm the components?

  37. #37
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,121
    Quote Originally Posted by jervana
    Bonus question for all you muddy dudes: How about doing nothing? I mean, just leaving it muddy. Will that harm the components?
    I have a confession. I did a muddy race Tuesday night, and my bike is still sitting un-touched in the back of my car.

    Do as I say. Not as I do.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    71
    the grease that is used in hubs and bottom brackets will not wash out with just some running water... as everyone here has said though, no pressurized water. I have ridden my bike thru standing water that was better that knee high and when i got home, i pulled the hubs apart and to my amazement, there was still grease in them.. I shot some oil in the BB and went about my business. also, i used pedros ice wax and that stuff never wore off with the water rides.. some of the loac trails in mid michigan are pretty gnarley with water and mud in the spring.. i rode it all... no damage to the bike.. in fact, ten years later, she still has some of the very same mud on the frame where the chainstays meet the seat tube.. dont be afraid to wash the horse. oh.. and as most have said... no wd40

  39. #39
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by bshallard
    I wish to contest this award with some dirt porn of my own. See below.

    For the record, I am one of those who like to put my bike away dirty and then brush the dried dirt off the following day. After 8 years the paint is not noticeably damaged from such treatment. I don't think I have taken to my bike with a towel in over 10 years.
    If it is covered in gunk then it will get hosed and maybe brushed, but I seldom take to it with the suds. Generally after a wet ride I will just lube the chain and wipe off the excess with a rag. This displaces water from inside the rollers, and the rag gets just enough onto the side plates to stop them rusting.

    well you do have better coverage but JC has more (although its suspicious how the fork stanchions & rotors remained so clean )
    how about a silver medal?

  40. #40
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by jervana
    Bonus question for all you muddy dudes: How about doing nothing? I mean, just leaving it muddy. Will that harm the components?
    I would be afraid that the dirt & grit would work their way into the bearings & pivots

  41. #41
    Killer b.
    Reputation: The Understater's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    well you do have better coverage but JC has more (although its suspicious how the fork stanchions & rotors remained so clean )
    how about a silver medal?
    I can live with silver. Different kind of mud. Mine was super wet and sloppy while his looks like it was drying out so it picked up lots and dumped it around the chainstay pivots. Mercifully all that mud in the derailleur never stopped my bike shifting.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wickerman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,268

    yummmm

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Add another supporter for Dan0's advice.

    When I had a hose, I would simply let water splash adjacently onto the moving parts, from say, the downtube onto the BB area.

    Now I live in a city, so I'm using one of those 5 liter garden sprayers. Have to see how it works out.

    Time for some dirt porn:





    as far as your 5 liter garden srayer goes, let me know if it works,. I moved into an apartment with a smaller deck then I had.At my old place, I hooked up the garden hose to the kitchen sink...worked great, but rembmer to shut off the taps before disconnecting the hose

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jervana's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    I would be afraid that the dirt & grit would work their way into the bearings & pivots
    In that case I have a bike to clean tomorrow.

  44. #44
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,466
    Quote Originally Posted by wickerman1
    as far as your 5 liter garden srayer goes, let me know if it works,. I moved into an apartment with a smaller deck then I had.At my old place, I hooked up the garden hose to the kitchen sink...worked great, but rembmer to shut off the taps before disconnecting the hose
    I used it yesterday to lightly clean my fork seals and the nearby areas so I can inspect under them. It worked quite well. One can use it without the nozzle, where it will just basically splash water onto the bike, which is good, but I actually found the fine atomizing nozzle most useful in this case and a toothbrush.

    i'm not going to say this will replace a garden hose and unlimited amounts of water, but I barely used enough water to register on the side gauge and the fork was clean. I also used a toothbrush to get into the tight areas.

    Dan0-
    As far as the stanchions go, believe me, that's how they showed when I left the trail. I was actually using travel. I would likely have needed to rebuild the fork if I was on the OE fox seals, as they aren't great for these types of conditions and don't scrape very well like the Enduros. The last moderate mud ride I did with them proved that the water and grit was getting inside the seal cavity where fox instructs you to clean. As the fork would extend, even after cleaning the exterior, mud-slurry would be drawn up from within the seal. Not a good system. The enduros simply keep all the crap out well and the profiling is nearer to the fox rear shock dust seal profile. There's simply a wedge that gets in and under the crap and sheds it.

  45. #45
    banned
    Reputation: Jerk_Chicken's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    16,466
    Quote Originally Posted by bshallard
    I can live with silver. Different kind of mud. Mine was super wet and sloppy while his looks like it was drying out so it picked up lots and dumped it around the chainstay pivots. Mercifully all that mud in the derailleur never stopped my bike shifting.
    It's funny because I actually did find my limits with SRAM for the first time. The RD held up admirably, though there were some mis-shifts. The biggest problem was the chain got so clogged that it was sucking like crazy and locking. I was lucky that I run a chainguide from Blackspire, so I simply took the chain off of it, and let it go below, conventionally. As the chain would suck, the guidewheel would break it off the chainring. The ride was completable with full usability after this, save for a few instances of the chain getting caught, pulling the derailleur cage forward, then slackening.

  46. #46
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    I used it yesterday to lightly clean my fork seals and the nearby areas so I can inspect under them. It worked quite well. One can use it without the nozzle, where it will just basically splash water onto the bike, which is good, but I actually found the fine atomizing nozzle most useful in this case and a toothbrush.

    i'm not going to say this will replace a garden hose and unlimited amounts of water, but I barely used enough water to register on the side gauge and the fork was clean. I also used a toothbrush to get into the tight areas.

    Dan0-
    As far as the stanchions go, believe me, that's how they showed when I left the trail. I was actually using travel. I would likely have needed to rebuild the fork if I was on the OE fox seals, as they aren't great for these types of conditions and don't scrape very well like the Enduros. The last moderate mud ride I did with them proved that the water and grit was getting inside the seal cavity where fox instructs you to clean. As the fork would extend, even after cleaning the exterior, mud-slurry would be drawn up from within the seal. Not a good system. The enduros simply keep all the crap out well and the profiling is nearer to the fox rear shock dust seal profile. There's simply a wedge that gets in and under the crap and sheds it.

    OK, the Olympic committee says Gold medal

  47. #47
    Killer b.
    Reputation: The Understater's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    It's funny because I actually did find my limits with SRAM for the first time. The RD held up admirably, though there were some mis-shifts. The biggest problem was the chain got so clogged that it was sucking like crazy and locking. I was lucky that I run a chainguide from Blackspire, so I simply took the chain off of it, and let it go below, conventionally. As the chain would suck, the guidewheel would break it off the chainring. The ride was completable with full usability after this, save for a few instances of the chain getting caught, pulling the derailleur cage forward, then slackening.

    I haven't had chain suck in years. Partly having an elevated swingarm helps, but also I have stayed with 8spd on the rear and I'm using 9spd front rings. Seems to be a good combo. I think the mud had something to do with it to. It's volcanic, so it's abrasive as hell, but not very sticky. I used to ride in muddy clay and that stuff just would cake up like nobody's business.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: stonycar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    39
    I was reading what you guys were saying about relubing the chain after cleaning it. What if after I clean my chain with a rag i just degrease it, wipe it down and leave it that way. I just relube on the next ride... ? Sometimes i use WD-40 just to prevent it from rust. Just need your opinion Thanks !

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,529
    Why not relube right away and give it time to soak in the rollers before riding? I try to do all my repairs and maintenance after a ride so I can just jump on the bike and go when I want.

  50. #50
    Get busy!!
    Reputation: ROCKHOPPER703's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    180
    Mud porn..........gurgle, gurgle..... I'd F*$% me...
    07 M4 Rockhopper Pro (Mango)
    Fox Fork 100mm / Chris King Headset

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •