1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: What do I need

  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    What do I need

    I bought my first bike this year and I would like to get a little familiar with doing some if my own repairs. I think id like to start with upgrading my brakes. I have a 2013 giant trance x1 29er. I plan on swapping out my avid elixirs 3 for shimano XT. I have seen a lot of good close out deals. I plan on doing brakes and rotors.
    What do I need besides front and rear brakes and rotors.?
    Will my current cables still work?
    Are there different types of mounts that I need to look for a certain one?
    Is there anything that I need to be aware of?
    Is it ok to bring a half worked on project to a lbs if I fail?

    Thanks


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  2. #2
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    Odds are you should be able to bolt everything right up with the same adapters, but I'm not 100% current all the time with exact models, so it's possible you might need one. If you order from a online site, the bigger ones have some pretty good customer reps that can help answer those types of questions if you call them up.

    Since the brakes are both hydraulics, those cables aren't actually cables. They're hoses filled with fluid. The new brakes should show up ready to work, complete with hoses and all already assembled. Hydraulic brakes out of the box are usually pretty easy to set up. There's all sorts of videos out there as a resource too; never hurts to sit through a couple. It's a pretty straightforward job though. Really helps if you've got a workstand or some sort of approximation of one.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    I'm not sure about adapters either...
    Otherwise: the right size metric hex keys for bolting them on.
    The hoses might or might not be the right length out of the box. Mine generally need shortening, to look neat, and then they need to be cut and bled correctly. Any LBS that I know of will be happy to do it. You just pay the list rate for labor and materials.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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