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  1. #1
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    What do I learn first?

    Hello everyone

    What do I learn first? I have a mtb skills book.

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    Straight Lines with Fabien Barel - YouTube
    So you don't get bounced off your bike--low heels.
    Cornering with Fabien Barel - YouTube
    Getting around turns.--practice on a grassy hill.

  3. #3
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    How to brake, under speed conditions without skidding.

  4. #4
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    Track stand, balance, braking, pumping are the essential skills I think on the trail.

    If you are comfortable at slow speed then leaning to slow down quickly would get you going fast in no time. Once you nailed those skills I'd go with manual next, not the one that you can just ride on the rear wheel but the mechanic of popping your front wheel up on or over things. It's such a good skill to have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Track stand, balance, braking, pumping are the essential skills I think on the trail.

    If you are comfortable at slow speed then leaning to slow down quickly would get you going fast in no time. Once you nailed those skills I'd go with manual next, not the one that you can just ride on the rear wheel but the mechanic of popping your front wheel up on or over things. It's such a good skill to have.
    Would balance be leaning(forward, backward)? Is that in order of importance? What is a track stand?

  6. #6
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    the first thing you should learn: the more you ride, the better you will be. No other factor is more important than this including bike selection, low end vs high end, tires, pedals, handlebars, colors, etc.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Would balance be leaning(forward, backward)? Is that in order of importance? What is a track stand?
    Forward, trackstand is pretty much the attempt to standstill while on your bike. It would teach you to be more comfortable on very slow speed. I struggled with cornering for a long time but mostly due to the traction, once I was more comfortable with less traction I was fine.

    Don't get me wrong faster speed, and momentum would get you out of trouble more time than not, but if you need to learn new skills it's the slow speed stuffs.

  8. #8
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    Is There a lesson for the balance on youtube?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Is There a lesson for the balance on youtube?
    Better check this out
    http://forums.mtbr.com/groups/t-w-o-...kills-link-11/

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Hello everyone

    What do I learn first? I have a mtb skills book.
    First rive things.

    1) Keep your feet on the pedals at all times. The feet and hands are primary control link to the bike. Not the seat.
    2) When it gets bumpy and you don't need pedal stand and let the bike move around under you rather than tossing you around.
    3) Don't go too slow. Going very slow over rough ground will toss you off the bike. However moving at a little bit of speed will help keep the bike up right.
    4) Don't let the front wheel stop rolling. This is how you crash by going over the handle bars.
    5) Mountain biking is an active sport. This means body position on the bike is critical for just about everything. If you just sit there on the seat and never move your body weight you will never be able to ride. Some times you shift the body weight forward (climbing) and back (descending) or side to side for cornering. As you read the books you will understand how to move the body weight, but up front you need to expect to do it. A good rider is constantly moving the bike under them and shifting weight around. They are always in the saddle and out of the saddle depending on the needs of the trail.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5",Vassago Verhauen SS 29" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Should I learn all those skills?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Should I learn all those skills?
    No only the one you need If you are riding on a smooth straight fireroad then you just learn the skills needed to get the job done

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    before i found this site, i watched this at least twice...

    Essential Mountain Biking Skills - YouTube

    joel

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    As long as you don't learn anything from her you are ok. Sorry Deb if you are here, it's just lol.
    Mountain Biking and Trail Riding : Downhill Mountain Biking Techniques - YouTube

    This is a great what not to do.
    Mountain Biking and Trail Riding : Downhill Mountain Biking Techniques - YouTube

  15. #15
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    What Mimi and others have said, and this...

    I think the most important thing to learn is to have fun. If it's fun, you'll keep coming back for more and find yourself learning all sorts of things. Don't work too much about "required" or "most valuable" skills. When you find yourself wanting to do something better, then study up on it or ask/observe others who you want to imitate.

    Sessioning is a good way to learn new technical skills. It means repeatedly trying to do something while on the trail. Can't clear that section of a climb? Try it a few times each time you ride that trail, go at it different ways until you get it. Soon you'll ride that section routinely and remember how difficult it used to be.

    And finally, keep your challenges reasonable - and safe. Go for what's just a bit beyond your current skill level. You'll learn faster, have more fun and stay in one piece.

    Ride on! Enjoy all the little victories.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  16. #16
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    Which things are fundamental to MTB?

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    What kind of riding do you plan to do, what type of trail? What kind of skills do you have already?

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    Learn how to pedal without getting tired. Learn how to pedal uphill without getting tired. Skills are a lot easier to execute when you're not tired.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537

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    a good place to start is properly sized bike.

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    What do I learn first?

    How in the world do you peddle uphill without getting tired? My fat but can only go so long on a climb until I push up the rest of it.

  21. #21
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    Probably should learn how to pedal first
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    What kind of riding do you plan to do, what type of trail? What kind of skills do you have already?
    Any trail I can find Likely no downhill. Probably XC/All mountain
    I can climb logs, ride descents, ride uphill, not much.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Any trail I can find Likely no downhill.
    I can climb logs, ride descents, ride uphill, not much.
    Sounds like you have got some skills already, for the uphill just keep riding. Now you may suffer a lot and go nowhere fast, soon you'd suffer just as much if not more but you'd be flying up the hill

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    thanks to everyone =)

  25. #25
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    Assuming you have a bike that will work for you...

    -Learn to get out of the seat for rough terrain. This is something that you don't often think of when riding on pavement, but its key for mtb.
    -Work on shifting at the right time. This was a HUGE thing for me when I started. I swear it took a year to start to get so that I would hit the right gear coming into a climb. Working on this is definitely a big issue.
    -Work on your vision - what you're looking at. Don't focus right in front of you - work to keep an eye out a little further so that you can prepare you & your bike for the next bit of terrain.

    As you spend more time on the trail you'll see where different techniques can be applied, and you'll start to develop the skills needed to use these techniques - like hanging your butt off the back of the bike on steep downhills, pedal ratcheting to avoid rock strikes, bunny hops, front end/back end tire hops, pedaling while standing to get over tech sections.

    But remember, time on the bike is what makes you better. Watching videos and reading tips can prepare you for the advancement, but only saddle time improves your skills.

    Good luck. Ride a lot.

    Steve Z
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    And paddling when it's wet

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    so you guys constantly shift gears on the trail? I have been staying pretty much in the same gear on hills and straights / flats. I have found out that shifting down while climbing sucks and sounds harsh on the gear set.

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    What do I learn first?

    Quote Originally Posted by 93civEJ1 View Post
    so you guys constantly shift gears on the trail? I have been staying pretty much in the same gear on hills and straights / flats. I have found out that shifting down while climbing sucks and sounds harsh on the gear set.
    I do ride single speed that I never have to shift but on my gear bikes I try to shift as often as I could to maintain momentum and speed. In general, more shifting is a good thing.

    I often try to maintain 85-95 rpm on the climb sometime lower, unless it's a technical climb then I push a little harder gear. Then I just shift as often as I need to maintain that rpm. I find that it's the best way to spend my energy on the trail.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by 93civEJ1 View Post
    so you guys constantly shift gears on the trail? I have been staying pretty much in the same gear on hills and straights / flats. I have found out that shifting down while climbing sucks and sounds harsh on the gear set.
    Shift gears, yes. Stay in front middle ring majority of time. shift out as needed for the extremes. It sounds harsh on gears when you try to shift to late and have all the pressure on chain. You just need to look farther down trail so that you can get into correct gear before things go critical. If your not switching gears, your walking up some hills you could ride up.

  29. #29
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    Work on staying loose, breathing, budgeting your energy, relaxing your upper body on climbs, keeping momentum (not dragging your breaks all the time) and do lots of slow figure 8's to get comfortable with balance and slow speed handling.

    Oh and have fun!

  30. #30
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    Should you stay in attack postion for most of your ride?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Should you stay in attack postion for most of your ride?
    No. It takes too much energy and should be saved for when you need it. And there's degrees of "attack position". Less demanding trail ahead means a more relaxed position will do fine. Gnarly stuff coming - get ready.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  32. #32
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    I try to stay in attack position as long and as often as I can, but like Gasp said, it takes a lot of effort to stay in that position. I'd say I do that about 70% on the descend, and sit up and rest when it's smoother then back on attack position. Like everything else, the more you do it the easier it becomes and it would appear effortless.

  33. #33
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    I guess "should" wasn't a the right word. As with Mimi, it might be just the thing. Me, I'm a slug, always looking for ways to conserve energy.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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    Okay thank you

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    When do you need to dip your heels down?

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    When do you need to dip your heels down?
    How do you absorb bumps with your arms and legs?

  37. #37
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    Stay loose, bend your elbows and knees and anticipate the bumps. You seem a little unsure of yourself, you just gotta go to an easy trail and ride. A lot of this stuff is surprisingly intuitive. If you know somebody else who has more experience see if you can ride with him/her sometime.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    How do you absorb bumps with your arms and legs?
    Like mwbikur says, try to stay loose loose enough so the bike goes up and down beneath you. With your butt out of the saddle, your hands and feet go up and down with the bike, but your torso and head remain relatively still.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

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    Okay. I just went to a pump track just to try and when I get to the top of the jump I pull my handlebars towards me(my elbows don't seem to want to bend on their own) and my body goes forward. Is this the correct way to do it?

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    I don't know much about pump tracks, but as a general rule, locked elbows lead to endo's. Keep them unlocked. When negotiating rocks and roots, keep your butt out of the saddle, lean forward a bit, and let your elbows and knees flex and move up and down with the bike. The amount you will be able to lean forward will be determined by the terrain: climbing = more forward; level = forward a bit; and downhill = butt up and back while still leaning forward.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  41. #41
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    Best thing to do is to ride! You'll figure out how to do alot of it just by putting some miles on your bike. Know that you will fall, and get back on and ride!
    Just circles turning circles....

  42. #42
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    First thing to learn is the ready position. Once you learn that, just go fast and try get a feel for what the trail demands of you subconsciously. Being in the ready position and maintaining it, not hanging off the back of the bike with fingers clamping down on the brakes and not holding the bike back by reining it with your limbs and body weight, will allow you to react to *multiple* incoming obstacles with natural flowing body movements, without any significant lag in between obstacles. Learn to let the bike flow and have your body flow with it, then add on skills to improve speed and fun as you wish. The most significant thing that should be going through your mind on the trail is your vision, to see where you want to go, and to see if there are any surprise obstacles that are 100% unrideable that you'd want to avoid (like another trail user).

    For better perspective, take a look at how one of the top pros rides:

    Fox Presents Danny Hart Fort William Helmet Cam Run by brule - Pinkbike

    Learn what your bike is capable of and trust it. Even a rigid bike can ride over small 6" rocks without a hitch, so you can just sort of ignore it and let the bike handle it, and just pick a straight line through everything, rather than slowing down to weave through to avoid them.

    Basically, the biggest step is to not let your mind get hung up on specific skills/obstacles. The "just ride" perspective is one frame of mind that accomplishes this. If you're wanting to go fast, the next biggest step is learning how to brake effectively. One of those mtb skills books can be misinterpreted, perhaps contradicting itself, saying that you should get back and low when on the brakes. In reality, you should really be in that centered ready position for as long as you are moving, which on a steep downhill might just be behind the saddle, but not so on more modest/level grades. If you plan on trying to come to a complete stop, then that technique is acceptable. Notice in the chest-cam video above, that he doesn't really ever get behind the saddle... it's only times when he pitches the front end of the bike down and pushes the bike forward, while airborne, that you see the tip of the saddle come into the camera frame for an instant. Learning when and when not to brake is something you can probably learn beforehand too, such as braking in anticipation for a loose turn while in the clear, and not an instant before, nor while in the turn.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    First thing to learn is the ready position. Once you learn that, just go fast and try get a feel for what the trail demands of you subconsciously. Being in the ready position and maintaining it, not hanging off the back of the bike with fingers clamping down on the brakes and not holding the bike back by reining it with your limbs and body weight, will allow you to react to *multiple* incoming obstacles with natural flowing body movements, without any significant lag in between obstacles. Learn to let the bike flow and have your body flow with it, then add on skills to improve speed and fun as you wish. The most significant thing that should be going through your mind on the trail is your vision, to see where you want to go, and to see if there are any surprise obstacles that are 100% unrideable that you'd want to avoid (like another trail user).

    For better perspective, take a look at how one of the top pros rides:

    Fox Presents Danny Hart Fort William Helmet Cam Run by brule - Pinkbike

    Learn what your bike is capable of and trust it. Even a rigid bike can ride over small 6" rocks without a hitch, so you can just sort of ignore it and let the bike handle it, and just pick a straight line through everything, rather than slowing down to weave through to avoid them.

    Basically, the biggest step is to not let your mind get hung up on specific skills/obstacles. The "just ride" perspective is one frame of mind that accomplishes this. If you're wanting to go fast, the next biggest step is learning how to brake effectively. One of those mtb skills books can be misinterpreted, perhaps contradicting itself, saying that you should get back and low when on the brakes. In reality, you should really be in that centered ready position for as long as you are moving, which on a steep downhill might just be behind the saddle, but not so on more modest/level grades. If you plan on trying to come to a complete stop, then that technique is acceptable. Notice in the chest-cam video above, that he doesn't really ever get behind the saddle... it's only times when he pitches the front end of the bike down and pushes the bike forward, while airborne, that you see the tip of the saddle come into the camera frame for an instant. Learning when and when not to brake is something you can probably learn beforehand too, such as braking in anticipation for a loose turn while in the clear, and not an instant before, nor while in the turn.
    Wow. Thank you for the huge answer. The video is good too. Any more videos like this?

  44. #44
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    If you want instructional videos, I'd recommend Fluidride. It's commercial (not free), but it's really good.

    Work on your core and upper body strength and muscle endurance too. You'll need some core endurance to carry the weight of your upper body, so it's not resting on your saddle and putting undue pressure on the tissue down there, and to allow you to maintain a more aggressive position, tucked forward and low, when you are trying to go as fast as possible.

    For examples on aggressive body position, take a look a Mick Hannah: https://www.google.com/search?q=Mick+Hannah&tbm=isch

    Some people think they might look similarly "aggro", but if they take a pic/vid of themselves, I bet they'll see otherwise. I think Mick's aggro stance is exceptional/exemplary. Look at where Mick's chin is, in relation to his stem/headtube, and then hop onto your bike and try and do that. Also note his arms and legs and how they're bent in a "sagged" positioned (like sagged suspension). Your arms and legs are the biggest source of suspension on your bike, though a high seatpost can limit the travel of your legs. That's why some upper body strength training is good, to improve the quality of the suspension in your arms to and be able to execute some maneuvers such as bunnyhops while at speed, yet still get back into the ready position. Being able to do 40 pushups and 15 pull-ups, with complete stop/starts at the top and bottom, is something I'd recommend achieving (it's actually pretty basic) before getting into the advanced stages of riding. If you do not work on your strength, you might just stay in the "women's beginner" level of riding for a while.
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    Love how some people seem to think mountain biking or biking in general is rocket science. It definitely is not a coincidence that individuals with the highest levels of common sense seem to be the best bikers... its really not that complicated...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    If you want instructional videos, I'd recommend Fluidride. It's commercial (not free), but it's really good.

    Work on your core and upper body strength and muscle endurance too. You'll need some core endurance to carry the weight of your upper body, so it's not resting on your saddle and putting undue pressure on the tissue down there, and to allow you to maintain a more aggressive position, tucked forward and low, when you are trying to go as fast as possible.

    For examples on aggressive body position, take a look a Mick Hannah: https://www.google.com/search?q=Mick+Hannah&tbm=isch

    Some people think they might look similarly "aggro", but if they take a pic/vid of themselves, I bet they'll see otherwise. I think Mick's aggro stance is exceptional/exemplary. Look at where Mick's chin is, in relation to his stem/headtube, and then hop onto your bike and try and do that. Also note his arms and legs and how they're bent in a "sagged" positioned (like sagged suspension). Your arms and legs are the biggest source of suspension on your bike, though a high seatpost can limit the travel of your legs. That's why some upper body strength training is good, to improve the quality of the suspension in your arms to and be able to execute some maneuvers such as bunnyhops while at speed, yet still get back into the ready position. Being able to do 40 pushups and 15 pull-ups, with complete stop/starts at the top and bottom, is something I'd recommend achieving (it's actually pretty basic) before getting into the advanced stages of riding. If you do not work on your strength, you might just stay in the "women's beginner" level of riding for a while.
    Any more chest cams?

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Love how some people seem to think mountain biking or biking in general is rocket science. It definitely is not a coincidence that individuals with the highest levels of common sense seem to be the best bikers... its really not that complicated...

    Until you try to explain something, it's terribly simple. Why, you just "do it". For sure, things can be over explained, but when people ask for advice, many in the forum try to help.

    And I assume, of course, that you are one of those people with the highest levels of common sense?
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Love how some people seem to think [social interactions] in general is rocket science. It definitely is not a coincidence that individuals with the highest levels of common sense seem to be the best [socializers]... its really not that complicated...
    Do you follow what you preach? Such shallow perspectives leave quite an impression on others.

    OP, you should start a new topic if you just want "chest-cams". I can't really recall any that are worth remembering, but here's one of the few interesting point-of-view mtb videos: GoPro HD HERO Camera: Crankworx Whistler - Brian Lopes Air Downhill Run - YouTube (you can learn a little about braking from this, if you listen for braking sounds)
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  49. #49
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    BOOK: Go read Brian Lopes book, it is the modern bible of MTB'ing.

    Brian is a 4x world champion mnt biker.

    His book has tons of color photos and lots of in-depth simplified explanations on all aspects of MTB'ing. He says key things to keep in mind on the trials such as: " stay heavy on the feet and light on the hands"

    U TUBE: Go to MTB TIPS channel, this super nice Australian guys helps beginners and intermediates like no other dude i have ever seen. https://www.youtube.com/user/mtbtips

    MY OWN ADVICE:

    1) Get a remote activated dropper seat post !

    Even if Your bike is a cheaper HT get a dropper post.

    Once You try a bike with a dropper post on it You mind will explode with MTB joy.

    You drop it down on DH sections so You can get your butt back to the rear of the bike without being jacked over when the seat jumps up as you hit a large bump or rock and the seat jups up and hits your ass , and then pop it back up on XC sections for comfortable full stretch full power peddling.

    2) Buy an AM = All Mountain = jack of all trades type MTB do NOT buy a full on DH bike as you cant really climb or go long XC on a DH bike.


    3) Buy the best modern and best possble bike You can afford , and / or then you can upgrade the wheels - derailer component group - shocks as you can afford over time etc.... buy a name brand bike Specialized - Giant- Trek - etc..... etc....


    4) Use big flat peddles aka 'flats' they are the easiest peddles to use in all conditions.

    5) Keep your bike in peak tune, do NOT let the shifting get sketchy, it wears out your chain and cassette - gears faster and makes your riding experience a hassle and causes your mind to be distracted when your trying to learn and groove your skills.


    6) Wear a freaking crash helmet and pads EVERY single time you ride.

    Cannot afford MTB knee - elbow gear , then go to a thrift store and buy roller street hockey crash gear until You can afford the fancy pants cool Troy Lee type gear. ( that includes gloves ).

    MTB crash gear is the best for the task, as it is made to stay on your knees and elbows 'after' the 1st impact while you are still sliding down that rocky embankment ,so the sooner you get real MTB crash gear the better.

    Neck brace and full face moto bike helmet are OK on any moderate DH trial or even DH fire road , basically any trial that that has rock gardens , technical's - drops and jumps or were you can go f-a-s-t then full face moto gear is OK, don't feel like You are 'over safe' and a sissy for wearing a lot of gear is YOUR body and brain so listen to YOUR own self


    You are gong to have a yard sale sooner or later as you learn and start to push to and take on more advanced trails You will be so happy that you remembered to bring those roller hockey elbow pads and wear them that day back when You were a beginner.

    7) Do NOT try to keep up with experts on advanced or expert trails, do NOT try to jump big air following the guys, until you have mastered small air.

    Your ego may have to accept the fact that for the time being the skinny little wimpy looking punk next door is also a free ride - DH 'MONSTER', so learn at your own pace.

    8) Find guys to ride with who are willing to mentor You on the trail, 99.9 percent of all MTB'ers are cool people who love to share the trial and help You out. .

    9 ) Take road trips to mountain shuttle van trails, and Summer ski lift MTB resorts, go to any MTB race , look learn and then one day enter a race.


    10) Finally smile a lot on the trail , open your mouth and suck bug's they are very nutritious just spit the bee's out real fast 'before' they sting Your lips ....PEACE

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Until you try to explain something, it's terribly simple. Why, you just "do it". For sure, things can be over explained, but when people ask for advice, many in the forum try to help.

    And I assume, of course, that you are one of those people with the highest levels of common sense?
    I like to think that I have an average amount of common sense. For example, I would never dream of asking someone to give me tips about how to bike over the internet unless it was in video format. The idea of trying to learn how to bike from typed words is ridiculous. Obviously I was expecting a response just like yours as I was typing my previous post.. or else I would severely lack common sense.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Do you follow what you preach? Such shallow perspectives leave quite an impression on others.

    OP, you should start a new topic if you just want "chest-cams". I can't really recall any that are worth remembering, but here's one of the few interesting point-of-view mtb videos: GoPro HD HERO Camera: Crankworx Whistler - Brian Lopes Air Downhill Run - YouTube
    I don't know what I was preaching so I guess I don't follow whatever it is. I was making an observation about the abundance of people who seem to think that biking is incredibly complicated and that asking "how do I ride my bike well" on forums is actually a good way to become a better rider.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    Do you follow what you preach? Such shallow perspectives leave quite an impression on others.

    OP, you should start a new topic if you just want "chest-cams". I can't really recall any that are worth remembering, but here's one of the few interesting point-of-view mtb videos: GoPro HD HERO Camera: Crankworx Whistler - Brian Lopes Air Downhill Run - YouTube (you can learn a little about braking from this, if you listen for braking sounds)
    Was just wondering if you had more chest cams. Not only looking for those.

  53. #53
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    From personal experience ride with better people. This in turn pushed me to get better and observe what they do.

    I think balance comes from riding and riding only, not books although they give you the fundememntals. how you ride is how you ride.

    Another thing i learnt which has changed it big time for me, like others have mentioned, choosing gears. Instead of going through your rear coggs one by one then going up or down on the from ones, learn to use just your front ones in particular for XC.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    I like to think that I have an average amount of common sense. For example, I would never dream of asking someone to give me tips about how to bike over the internet unless it was in video format. The idea of trying to learn how to bike from typed words is ridiculous. Obviously I was expecting a response just like yours as I was typing my previous post.. or else I would severely lack common sense.
    Perhaps reading doesn't work well for you - not slamming, just maybe you learn better from a visual presentation. But many can benefit from well written suggestions. I certainly have. It's not a substitute for going out and actually doing it, but it can give one ideas about what to try differently.

    And maybe you could drop the snarky attitude.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Perhaps reading doesn't work well for you - not slamming, just maybe you learn better from a visual presentation. But many can benefit from well written suggestions. I certainly have. It's not a substitute for going out and actually doing it, but it can give one ideas about what to try differently.

    And maybe you could drop the snarky attitude.
    Not for nothing, but if the OP hasn't figured out how to search for mtb videos on the internet without coming here to ask for help, I don't think he's going to get much out of this thread, or any thread for that matter.


    Two words: go ride.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Not for nothing, but if the OP hasn't figured out how to search for mtb videos on the internet without coming here to ask for help, I don't think he's going to get much out of this thread, or any thread for that matter.


    Two words: go ride.
    Maybe so. Sometimes I wish people would do their own research before asking for answers. But people ask, and answers come, and some of them are good answers, and sometimes they actually help people. It's an internet forum, after all.
    Use it, use it, use it while you still have it.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gasp4Air View Post
    Maybe so. Sometimes I wish people would do their own research before asking for answers. But people ask, and answers come, and some of them are good answers, and sometimes they actually help people. It's an internet forum, after all.
    well said. its in the beginners forum and a lot of people actually like to help out and give their views. I really dont see why people get their knickers in a twist about asking fellow forum people rather than spending hours sorting through search results and items that kind of relate but not quite, or questions that may have been covered before.
    Don't open the thread if you have seen it before?

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Not for nothing, but if the OP hasn't figured out how to search for mtb videos on the internet without coming here to ask for help, I don't think he's going to get much out of this thread, or any thread for that matter.


    Two words: go ride.
    I have searched for MTB videos but some are better then others.

  59. #59
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    first, use flat pedals. no clipless(it only addresses pedalling).

    ride like a little kid. go to a bmx track if you are able and take a skills class. every actual riding skill you'll ever need you can make happen there. easier to create good habits there. Pump tracks are great, too.

    climbing, gears..all that is easy to understand as it will directly relate to fitness.

    Always learn how to pump the terrain first. It dictates your flow and body movement on the bike to become efficient and strong at the same time. obstacles and dirt conditions will be easier to adapt to. ride like a kid.

    learn to crash well, wheelie, bunny-hop, jump to a degree and you'll double the fun on any ride forever not to mention easier to keep yourself safe with these skills as you get fit and faster!

  60. #60
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    1: When you're in the rough stuff, don't look at the things you're trying to avoid: the large tree next to the trail, the boulder in the middle, or the cliff off the other side. Look at the path you want your tire to go and it will tend to follow.

    2: Look at the terrain again and shift into the right gear before you get there. Downshift just before starting a climb and if descending onto a flat, shift into a higher gear ahead of time and have fun shooting out of the bottom of the hill at full speed.

    3: Find a trail with some spots that are difficult (but not foolhardy) for you and ride it a couple times a week, trying to get past the obstical smoother every time. When it gets too easy, pick a more difficult trail.

  61. #61
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    At this point you need to get out and ride. Ride ride ride and then turn back to some video or books for technique. You will not remember it all now and everything you see and read will make more sense the more time you put on the bike. Start slow on the descents, but never let the bike stop either. On the climbs pedal hard and remember that a little bit of speed makes things easier. A short really steep section can be tackled easier with a little speed than approaching it slow. Same with rock bit. A little speed is handy to keep the bike up right. What I say a little speed I mean the difference between a brisk walking pace and solid run, (but not a 100 meter sprint).

    When it comes to body position arms bend at the elbows and knees bent. Try keep you core stable and let front wheel move with terrain letting the angle of the fore arms change following the front wheel. On the rear wheel again let it move with terrain, but let the legs move as well as the rest of the bike while you keep your core stable.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5",Vassago Verhauen SS 29" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    At this point you need to get out and ride. Ride ride ride and then turn back to some video or books for technique. You will not remember it all now and everything you see and read will make more sense the more time you put on the bike. Start slow on the descents, but never let the bike stop either. On the climbs pedal hard and remember that a little bit of speed makes things easier. A short really steep section can be tackled easier with a little speed than approaching it slow. Same with rock bit. A little speed is handy to keep the bike up right. What I say a little speed I mean the difference between a brisk walking pace and solid run, (but not a 100 meter sprint).

    When it comes to body position arms bend at the elbows and knees bent. Try keep you core stable and let front wheel move with terrain letting the angle of the fore arms change following the front wheel. On the rear wheel again let it move with terrain, but let the legs move as well as the rest of the bike while you keep your core stable.
    Once I ride i will probably have more questions

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    I have searched for MTB videos but some are better then others.
    Did you watch this vid?
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/y9cwoQpRUqo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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    Yes, when you ride some things wil come naturally and others may be more difficult. Then look up videos that talk about the situations you fine more difficult.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    As long as you don't learn anything from her you are ok. Sorry Deb if you are here, it's just lol.
    Mountain Biking and Trail Riding : Downhill Mountain Biking Techniques - YouTube

    This is a great what not to do.
    I agree, poor advice. One of the dangers of trying to use the rear brake only is that you can get confused and use the front brake only, which is probably the only thing worse that using the rear brake only.

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredjekyll View Post
    Love how some people seem to think mountain biking or biking in general is rocket science. It definitely is not a coincidence that individuals with the highest levels of common sense seem to be the best bikers... its really not that complicated...
    Sounds great when you said it but unfortunately not always true. Experience trumps commonsense sometimes when it comes to mountain bike skills as many things are counter intuitive. Same can be said about golf, tennis, and many other sports. Best bikers are not ones with highest levels of commonsense but experience, so utter the term Commonsense for all is just bad, getting defensive is just patently stupid

    Commonsense says to slow down over rough stuffs, when experience says more speed actually help you thru the section easier by skimming thru the top.

    Commonsense says be careful of that rock, keep an eye on it, experience says scan, acknowledge the rock but keep your eyes on where you want to go.

    Commonsense says lifting the front wheel is not a rocket science you just have to lift the front wheel and if you want to jump with clipless just lift the rear up using the pedal, Wrong, Wrong, Wrong. I'll let you figure that one out using your commonsense

    OP's latest question, Pumping; Commonsense says floating over bumps is faster and offer more control, unfortunately it's not true in this case, forcing front and rear downward would not only yield better control but boost speed as well.

    These are only a few things that commonsense gets it wrong, too many to list in one post. That's why many bike clinics are filled with people with commonsense but little experience.

    What do you say, we give OP a little break, huh?

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Did you watch this vid?
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/y9cwoQpRUqo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Yes. Good video.

  68. #68
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    Also, When you reach logs(small or big) should you lift your front tire to get over it?

  69. #69
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    What do I learn first?

    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Also, When you reach logs(small or big) should you lift your front tire to get over it?
    Manual. No lifting check out the first bike skill link I posted for you on the first page. I consider Joe Lawwill one of the best rider on one wheel. He often wheelie extended distance with no hand.
    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Bump^
    How do you absorb bumps with your arms and legs

    Attack position


    Also found this one you'd want to learn
    http://www.leelikesbikes.com/benefit...w-to-ride.html

  70. #70
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    Won't you fall if you manual over a big log?

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by MountainBiker8 View Post
    Won't you fall if you manual over a big log?
    How big? too big you won't be able to manual over it once the rear wheel catch the traction you'd be stopped on your track.

    Learn to manual first, then manual over small stuffs like 5" curb, then move on to 1' ledge soon you'd be doing bigger stuffs.

    Post the vid of your ride, then someone can give you some good pointers.

    The best way to learn is from your mistakes, at this rate you have a lot of crashing no catching up to do

  72. #72
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    2 more quick question if I'm not annoying you
    Can you only pump backsides of jumps or can you bend your body and pump down any downslope?
    Should you be in attack position for corners?

  73. #73
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    first question??? I have no idea what you are talking about, so I'm not even going to try. Are you talking about landing?

    2nd question, yes if you can. There are too many variations so it's difficult to say that you "must stay" in an attack position.

  74. #74
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    Do you have to suck up a frontside to pump?
    Last edited by MountainBiker8; 08-08-2013 at 06:00 PM.

  75. #75
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    OP....

    If it has not been said yet... Go pick up "Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition"

    link here: Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition: Brian Lopes, Lee McCormack: 9780736083713: Amazon.com: Books

    Also, at the top of this forum there is a sticky labeled "biking skills videos"

    Each page has videos. In total it's over six hours worth of information to take in AND apply on the trail. It hasn't been update as of lately because there hasn't been any good instructional videos of lately but it has everything.

    Link: Mountain Biking Skills Videos

    And good luck MIMI.
    Yip yip yip nope nope nope

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hutch3637 View Post
    OP....

    If it has not been said yet... Go pick up "Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition"

    link here: Mastering Mountain Bike Skills - 2nd Edition: Brian Lopes, Lee McCormack: 9780736083713: Amazon.com: Books

    Also, at the top of this forum there is a sticky labeled "biking skills videos"

    Each page has videos. In total it's over six hours worth of information to take in AND apply on the trail. It hasn't been update as of lately because there hasn't been any good instructional videos of lately but it has everything.

    Link: Mountain Biking Skills Videos

    And good luck MIMI.
    Okay thank you.

  77. #77
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    start with the very very basics, what does someone who has little experience do when they get on a bike, they ride straight and corner.

    Learn how to corner first and for most, body position is so important and bad cornering is harder to correct than to learn it right the first time.

    Second straight, learn how to pump the terrain, bunny hop, jump, read lines, track stands (btw track stands you need to be off the brakes standing dead still)

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