1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    What is the cost of upkeep on Bikes

    What I am asking is What is the cost to replace the parts on bikes.
    I Have looked around and bought a 1000$ Giant Talon 0's.
    I may want a bike with x9 xxx1, equipment but if I lost a 300$ part My bike would be out of commision for 3 months, But if i plan ahead i can spare 100$ to fix my bike. Has any one else thought of this? My question is? What are the expected annual costs and parts one would want/need to replace. Lets say the user rides 3 or 4 days a weeks 10 to 20 miles a trip,

  2. #2
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    What is the cost of upkeep on Bikes

    It should only cost you a few bucks a months for tubes and some lubes. If you don't break anything that's all it's gonna cost you. Mtb parts can last a few years of trail riding just need a little TLC.

    That said, we all have the need to upgrade and that can be expensive


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  3. #3
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    In the late '80s I bought an entry level Univega for $400. By the time I was done with it, I had over $2500 into it. I broke or bent nearly every part on the bike. I tried to put slightly better parts on when something broke, but I never changed a part that wasn't damaged.
    Last edited by joneill4; 03-04-2013 at 03:34 AM. Reason: clarity

  4. #4
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    If you keep up with maintenance then your planned costs drop significantly. Besides tubes I can plan on a couple of bottles of chain lube, a set of shifter cables and housing, suspension oil and seals, and a chain every season. With proper maintenance (and not a small amount of luck) you can keep most of the hardware around for a long time. Eventually you're going to crash or break something, but it's not easy to predict. Buy the tools you need to maintain your bike and learn what to do. Save the rest of the money for your inevitable crashes or failures.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I'm lucky enough to have access to a team form for a lot of my ordering. One thing that's done is push me to make my big order, all at once, and stockpile frequently-needed maintenance parts like chains and brake pads.

    I'd say I spend $100-$200 a year on maintaining 4-5 bikes. Expect to spend about the same if you order from the internet, or about 50% more if you buy stuff at your LBS.

    Where people start running into high ongoing costs are either underbuying in the first place, frequent crashes, or upgradeitis.

    I have observed that I tend to kill a rear derailleur every couple of years. I just buy the Deore Shadow rear derailleur - it works great and isn't too expensive to replace when it comes up. If the cost of replacing any one part on your bicycle is going to be a problem for you, don't buy that part! I guess I don't follow my own guideline with regard to the suspension fork, and I think I'd be pretty bummed if I broke a frame, but otherwise, nothing on my bike is going to do more than ruin my ride (and maybe my day if it's far and I can't improvise something) by breaking.

    I know the immediate "look at other bikes" impulse upon buying a bike. But it always fades for me, and I just ride my bike and enjoy it. And I gotta say, when I demo higher-end bikes than my own, lately, I think I get the wrong message. But it sure was nice of SRAM to lend me something to finish a race last summer.

    What is the cost of upkeep on Bikes-audiophiles.png
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    (Incidentally, if you follow the link, the mouseover text for this cartoon is almost better than the cartoon.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    I try to plan ahead. When cleaning my bike I check for worn parts and start looking for sale items. I purchase 1 new front and 2 new rear tires and a couple of tubes each summer for my bikes. I do cables and housing every couple of years. I would say I am on par with the others of about 200-300 to maintain the 4 bikes in my family. My kids cost are more than mine...little buggers love to skid. But I would much rather replace tires than waste money on video games for them.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drbo View Post
    I try to plan ahead. When cleaning my bike I check for worn parts and start looking for sale items. I purchase 1 new front and 2 new rear tires and a couple of tubes each summer for my bikes. I do cables and housing every couple of years. I would say I am on par with the others of about 200-300 to maintain the 4 bikes in my family. My kids cost are more than mine...little buggers love to skid. But I would much rather replace tires than waste money on video games for them.
    This^^^
    I usually buy parts I want before I need it. So when I find a good deal I'd just grab them up especially during the holiday's sales and off season. For example I bought $100 fox flux helmet for $35 no tax free shipping, exactly the same price on the 5.10 shoes. There's even more great deals on components so keep the look out for them.

  8. #8
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    Spend a bit on some good cleaning kit and lube (Muc-off, GT85, some chain lube and perhaps some fork lube), wash your bike down after every ride; clean the chain, remove all mud, clean the forks (especially the stanchions and seals), spray the chain and all pivots (front and rear mech for example) and fork lube the stanchions and you will vastly prolong the life of all components.

    It takes 20-30 mins but will save you money in the long run.

    As others have said, then some spare tubes a chain a year (if you ride frequently enough), budget for rear cassette every so often and you'll be good to go.

    Maintaining even high end bikes needn't be costly if you look after the basics.

    Cheers

    Danny B

  9. #9
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    Thanks all!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrd View Post
    What I am asking is What is the cost to replace the parts on bikes.
    I Have looked around and bought a 1000$ Giant Talon 0's.
    I may want a bike with x9 xxx1, equipment but if I lost a 300$ part My bike would be out of commision for 3 months, But if i plan ahead i can spare 100$ to fix my bike. Has any one else thought of this? My question is? What are the expected annual costs and parts one would want/need to replace. Lets say the user rides 3 or 4 days a weeks 10 to 20 miles a trip,
    with riding that much you are definitely going to wear out tires each season. My tires cost about 50-80 each.

    I lube and clean my drivetrain every time I ride. This hopefully will lengthen the life of my drivetrain. Monitor your chain wear. If you let it wear too much it will prematurely damage your cassette and rings. But you will probably get a new chain every year @ about $40. A new cassette and rings might be about $100 every few years.

    Brake pads will depend on how often you brake. When you first start out you might be braking too much. I wore out my first set of pads in a month. About $20 each to replace.

    Chances are nothing will break - even people who ride aggressively might break a rear derailleur every 2 years. An xt derailleur is about $65 so not too bad.

    If you dont do the work yourself you can count on the cost being about double the cost of the parts. So if the part is $60, it will probably be $120 total. Yearly tuneups and general can be around $150-$300. I personally do it myself as the tools arent too specialized. Although bottom bracket tools, chain tools and hub tools can add up.

    I think if you dont maintain things yourself you can count on spending about $500/year. If you do maintain things yourself it will probably be about $250 or so per year.

  11. #11
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    Dayamn.

    You're getting better prices than me on derailleurs, I think, but what your tires and chains made out of? Platinum fiber composite?? (Alternatively, why use internet skillz on the derailleur that you don't know when you'll break, but not the maintenance parts you know you're likely to wear out by the end of the season?)

    One trick for getting some more life out of tires, for those who use matched front and rear tires, is to rotate them. When the tread's too far gone on the rear tire, sell it to a hipster to make a belt or something, move the front tire to the rear, and replace that. You get the nice new tire with the tall tread on the front, you've already "fastered" the tire a bit before it hits the rear, and you don't run into the issue of front tires starting to suffer age-related stuff before the tread's given all it has to give.

    I don't think I've used matched tires on a mountain bike since 2007, so doesn't really help me there, but I do try to rotate on my road bike.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wyrd View Post
    What I am asking is What is the cost to replace the parts on bikes.
    I Have looked around and bought a 1000$ Giant Talon 0's.
    I may want a bike with x9 xxx1, equipment but if I lost a 300$ part My bike would be out of commision for 3 months, But if i plan ahead i can spare 100$ to fix my bike. Has any one else thought of this? My question is? What are the expected annual costs and parts one would want/need to replace. Lets say the user rides 3 or 4 days a weeks 10 to 20 miles a trip,
    Depneds strongly on conditions......rain mud sand...snow sleet salt....can all kill a chain and pads in a week or two of riding...

    Nice dry pavement or trails without dust .....bike could last years without replacement parts...

    Service and maintance is the next big factor.

  13. #13
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    Disc brake pads - $30 a year.
    Chain - $40 a year or maybe every 2 years.
    Lube - $10 a year.
    Cables/housing - $30 every 2 years.
    Stan's - $20 every 2 years.

    You may not need to replace all of these items, but I would say maintenance stuff - $100-150 a year is reasonable for someone that really wants to take care of their bike ridden in *normal* conditions and assuming you do you own work...add another $100 on their for labor at a shop if you can't do these items yourself.

    Breaking things is a different story and will obviously be dependent on what you break and what level of replacement part you use.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  14. #14
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    No one can say. It depends on what bike you have, when, where, how and how often you ride, how often and hard you crash, and how much you can and want to do yourself. Not to mention how picky/anal you are.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  15. #15
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    very much depends on the bike, where you ride and stuff like that.

    my commuter has cost me less than 50 gbp (~80 USD) in the last 3 years with just tyres and brake pads being required.

    my MTB has cost considerably more just in consumables (not counting breakages) bu then a British winter will kill almost anything...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Dayamn.

    You're getting better prices than me on derailleurs, I think, but what your tires and chains made out of? Platinum fiber composite?? (Alternatively, why use internet skillz on the derailleur that you don't know when you'll break, but not the maintenance parts you know you're likely to wear out by the end of the season?)

    One trick for getting some more life out of tires, for those who use matched front and rear tires, is to rotate them. When the tread's too far gone on the rear tire, sell it to a hipster to make a belt or something, move the front tire to the rear, and replace that. You get the nice new tire with the tall tread on the front, you've already "fastered" the tire a bit before it hits the rear, and you don't run into the issue of front tires starting to suffer age-related stuff before the tread's given all it has to give.

    I don't think I've used matched tires on a mountain bike since 2007, so doesn't really help me there, but I do try to rotate on my road bike.


    slx shadow + rear derailleur (actually $70, the shadow is $60)
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano RD-M675 SLX Shadow Plus Rear Derailleur 10 Speed

    I use an XTR chain
    BlueSkyCycling.com - Shimano XTR M980 10 Speed Chain

    Based on these suggestions
    Ask a Mechanic: Shimano XTR Ė Where To Spend Your Money | Artís Cyclery Blog

    I run hans dampf on the front and ikon on the rear

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by joneill4 View Post
    In the late '80s I bought an entry level Univega for $400. By the time I was done with it, I had over $2500 into it. I broke or bent nearly every part on the bike. I tried to put slightly better parts on when something broke, but I never changed a part that wasn't damaged.
    Seriously? And I thought I was the only one who spent way more on his bike than what he bought it for...

  18. #18
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    It occurred to me after I posted that maybe it was 10-speed that was driving people to the really pricey chains.

    For the first time in about four years, I have all of my multispeed bikes standardized on one cog count and pull ratio...

    Shimano 9-speed.

    It was somewhat by accident - one of my road bikes had been Shimano 10-speed for a while. I bought another one about a year ago that came to me as SRAM 10-speed.

    When the SRAM shifter broke, I de-evolved that bike to 9-speed Shimano-compatible downtube shifters. I didn't want to spend $200 on shifters for a bike whose job is to take me to school and be left locked outside a lot. Going 9-speed at the time also let me use a cassette I had on hand, and got me back into the land of less crazy chain and cassette replacement costs - also more fitting with the bike's mission. I can't really claim it's a save-me-money bike because I don't get a choice about buying my bus pass, so there's no marginal cost in taking the bus instead.

    MTB's been 9-speed since 2009 - it was 8-speed when I bought it, and since compatibility is broken from 9- to 10-, "You can have my 9-speed drivetrain when you pry it out of my cold, dead hands." Although I'll probably not get a choice next time I buy a complete mountain bike.

    I sent the 10-speed road bike to my brother last week, and I didn't feel like swapping its drivetrain onto the road bike I'm keeping, which has been 9-speed all along.

    I have to say, every time I bought a 10-speed cassette, I regretted moving that road bike to 10-speed. So I'm happy enough to have them all take the same chain, and I can choose a road cassette size to use on both road-going bikes. Makes ordering simpler, anyway. We'll see how long it lasts...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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