1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    16

    What to buy in addition to a bike, helmet and ride accessories

    I am a total Noob so some questions might sound stupid

    So after over researching and spending countless hours on the internet I finally ordered 2013 Marin Bobcat Trail 29er (arrives in a week) to learn on a hardtail and then may be next year I can get a real bike after I know what my riding style is.

    I wanted to know what items/tools do I need to buy for assembly or regular upkeep of a bike. I plan to assemble it myself and then take it to a LBS for first tune up to be safe.

    I did find some posts regarding what to carry on hydration pack and bought few items but I am specifically asking for tools to be kept in the apartment. If you have any suggestions feel free to let me know.

    I have already bought a helmet, topeak Alien II multi tool, lezyne micro floor drive( mini pump), tire levers, hydration pack, Gloves

    1)I guess I would also need a floor pump- Any recommendations for a pump that can be used on tubeless tires as well as I guess I will upgrade to one in a few months or next year.

    2 ) Also regarding a spare tire tube. Is there a size for one or is it generic 29er
    The specs of the bike are
    Hub Rear: Formula, 32 Hole
    Hub Front: Formula, 32 Hole
    Rim: Alex SX44
    Spokes Nipples: 14 Gauge Black Stainless
    Tires: Geax Saguaro, 29 x 2.2"

    3) I don't even know if its presta or schrader . The full specs of the bike are here Marin Bikes | Bobcat Trail 29er | Mountain Bikes, Road Bikes, and City/Commuter Bicycles | us

    4) Are patch repair kits all same- any recommendations ?

    5) I guess I also might need some shin guards and knee guards as I am sure I will crash a few times before I learn the how to ride on trails- any suggestions for sizing and brands. I am 5ft 5 inches and weight 164 pounds( need to bring it down )

    6) what about elbow pads- did/do you use it as a beginner- I guess I will go in full armor for the rides !

    7) How important is a bike computer or a GPS ? Do you use it on trails. I went retro last year and ditched my smartphone for a dumbphone. So if I need it I might have to go back to smartphone. I have a forerunner 310XT that I use for running so I don't know if I buy any more accessories that can make it functional.

    8) Do you carry a tire pressure gauge in your hydration pack as well ?

    9) Any additional items ?
    Last edited by labbike; 06-21-2014 at 09:08 AM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,103
    1. I as many do, use a Topeak Joe Blow. Excellent pump.

    2. Are you talking about the actual tire or a spare tubes? If the tire, wait until you get the bike and see how well you like what's on the bike. If you like them, get another. If not, try to figure out what you don't like and you'll have to research to find out about tires that do/don't do what you're looking for. If you need tubes, yeah, just get a 29er tube. There really isn't anything specific about them so they are more or less generic.

    3. Doesn't matter. I good pump will handle either. Spare tubes, I'd just get presta personally. If you'd rather have schrader you'll have to make sure the valve will fit the hole in the rim.

    4. I like the vulcanizing patches rather than the stick on patches. I usually grab whatever is at the counter of my shop which is usually Park and they work just fine.

    5. You don't need them for XC riding. If you want them, go for it. I don't wear them or know anyone that does so I can't recommend anything.

    6. Same as #5.

    7. Not important. They are cool to keep track of rides and stats and to easily share on social media if that's something you want to do. But all that info really isn't important for just riding. If you are training for racing you might want some data to keep track of your performance. And as long as you know the area you are riding or have a trail map, you don't need GPS either. That said, I do ride with a Garmin 510 for the reasons I mentioned above except for the race training. I just like to see some of the data and share with friends and keep track of my mileage and efforts.

    8. No.

    9. On the trail/road I just make sure I have a tube, patch kit, inflation, a multitool, tire boots in case of tire damage (squares of a few different sizes cut from a Tyvec priority mail envelope works awesome for this and they are free), tire irons, a little cash...I think that's it. A good pair of padded shorts/bibs, helmet, gloves, eye protection. That's what I ride with most of the time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    16
    Thanks for taking time to answer all my queries. I did edit the post for #2. I meant a spare tube .

    Also, there are many topeak joe blow..is it the pro , sport , Max HP ?
    Any specific tools or tool set to assemble a bike or would the multi tool be enough.
    Last edited by labbike; 06-21-2014 at 09:25 AM. Reason: floor pump added

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,792
    You are now a couple rungs up the mtb ladder already. You need a high pressure shock pump for the Raidon air fork on your bike. A floor pump won't work.
    Sette Air 2 ST-35 Universal Shock Pump | Sette | Brand | www.PricePoint.com
    Believe it or not, tubes are very stretchy. I use 26x2.1-2.5 tubes for 29 tires no problem. Easier to find and cheaper. You do have to inflate one a little to get it to start the stretch to go on the rim. But this helps you avoid pinching it when you put the tire fully on. You should also do that with a 29 tube.

    A multi should do most except possibly the pedals.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You are now a couple rungs up the mtb ladder already. You need a high pressure shock pump for the Raidon air fork on your bike. A floor pump won't work.
    Sette Air 2 ST-35 Universal Shock Pump | Sette | Brand | www.PricePoint.com


    Believe it or not, tubes are very stretchy. I use 26x2.1-2.5 tubes for 29 tires no problem. Easier to find and cheaper. You do have to inflate one a little to get it to start the stretch to go on the rim. But this helps you avoid pinching it when you put the tire fully on. You should also do that with a 29 tube.

    A multi should do most except possibly the pedals.
    Thanks for the info. I did read a lot of your posts earlier and primarily bought this bike on your recommendation .

    Just to be sure , I need a shock pump in addition to a regular tire floor pump ?

    Hopefully by next weekend I will hit the trails.

  6. #6
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,034

    Re: What to buy in addition to a bike, helmet and ride accessories

    1) Joe Blow MOUNTAIN pump. High volume/low pressure pump gives you the best shot to pump up tubeless tires without a compressor. No guarantee though.

    5-6). Lots of stuff to choose from. I suggest just going out and riding and not worry too much about it now. Look for a shop that carries a variety of armor because fit / comfortability is personal.

    7). Bike computer? I don't. Do you want to track how many miles you ride? If so get one.

    8). Tire pressure gauge? No reason to carry one really. If you ever need to air up on a trail just do it by feel to get through the day.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,878
    Some rims come drilled only for presta ,you can drill them to take Schrader . For patches I go to a auto parts store and a kit there ,more patches and glue for cheaper. I also have a Joe blow,good pump.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,792
    Quote Originally Posted by labbike View Post
    Just to be sure , I need a shock pump in addition to a regular tire floor pump ?
    Hopefully by next weekend I will hit the trails.
    Yes a totally different pump only good for your fork/shock.
    You pump the fork up to a psi amount based on your weight to set the sag and how you want the fork to perform over bumps. You can make adjustments for different terrain.

  9. #9
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,318
    I mostly skimmed, but thought I'd comment on the Garmin. I borrowed a ForeRunner 310 from a friend before settling on the watch I bought. It should work fine. I think it was the advanced workouts feature that sold me on the 610, but if I remember correctly, the 310 had a decent bike mode and supported the speed/cadence accessory. Check the web site. Anyway, there's not much a dedicated bike computer would do and the 310 won't.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    194
    Only piece of electronic technology you really should have is a watch to make sure you don't get caught out too late. Phone is a good idea, but you might not always be in service area. Everything else is nice to play with.

    Protective gear, helmet you've already got covered. Gloves highly recommended, when you take spills that will be number one to take damage. Generally knee & elbows wont see as much unless you start get some speed going. Shin guards are definitely nice as getting shinned by pedals is inevitable and hurts like a mother. Use anything that fits good, I used to use soccer ones before the explosion of bike specific stuff. Eyewear also highly recommended. Along these lines, you might want to carry a small basic first aid kid. Cleanser, bandages to clean & dress scrapes.

    For home tools, I prefer a more dedicated set of allen keys rather than a multi tool. Easier to use. A complete set will cover almost all the basic bike fastners, although Torx is starting to find its way in. You'll prob want a good pair of cutters for the cables. I've used the cutters of Vice Grips for inner cable & it works pretty good, but they'll make a mess out of outer housing. The first bicycle specific tool you should consider is a chain tool. Other stuff can wait. Maybe spoke wrench. Floor pump I use the classic Silca.

    Patch kit I also prefer the classic Rema. Learn to do it right and a patch will last the life of the tube. Tubes are sized, but you can get away with undersized tubes. I'm also oldschool 26", but I carry 26x1.25 super narrows as emergency spares. I'd try to stick with same diameter though, makes it easier to install.

    No need carry a air gauge, although at first it might not be bad to have to experiment with pressures until you achieve a calibrated thumb. On trail repair, pump until you get tired, you'll be hard pressed to overinflate with a micro pump!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    10
    5) My girlfriend crashed her bike and had her knees cut up pretty badly on our second ride. It wasn't very high speed, but the trail we were on was some what sandy and had gravels. After that we both went out and bought some comfortable knee pads. It took her out of riding for a week. If you are risk-averse like me, then it could be something to look into.

    7) Bike computer is one of the first things I got when I first started riding around a month ago. It offers some essential stats to help me track my progress as a beginner rider

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,318

    I realize I'm using a pretty fancy computer. But there are no essential stats and this applies to me too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    735
    for rides 2 hours + I bring a gu or equivalent for every 45 minutes. I also bring tums/electrolyte pills for longer rides.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    423

    Re: What to buy in addition to a bike, helmet and ride accessories

    I would also suggest getting a work stand. It makes it easier to clean or do some maintenance work on your bike.
    What works for me may not work for you. What's best for you depends on many factors. We are different from each other.

  15. #15
    Trailhead Poseur
    Reputation: jjaguar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    467
    A few thoughts:

    4) The vulcanizing patches that you glue on are more reliable, but the sticker type are faster, and I have both. I keep the sticker kind in my pack because it's faster if I need to patch a hole on the trail, and it takes up practically no space because the box is only about the size of a stick of gum folded in half. But they tend to peel off over time, so it's more of a band-aid fix to finish the ride. I use the glue-on patches for a permanent fix at home, but don't carry it on the trail so I'm not standing around waiting for the glue to set up, and don't have to worry about a leaky tube of glue in my pack.

    FWIW I also carry a spare tube, the patches are for insurance. Normally I just change the tube, but if I get a second puncture then the patches are there to get me home.

    7) I second the recommendation to stick with the 310XT. I have one that I originally bought for running that I use on the bike. As you know, it was designed for triathletes so it has a cycling mode as well. I don't even have an official mount for it, I just buckle the strap around the handlebar. Unless I ever want a GPS with a map display, I don't see any reason to upgrade.

    9) Do you have proper hand tools at home? The multitool is good for trailside repair and adjustments, but you'll want to use a good set of tools for routine maintenance work. You don't need to stock up on bike-specific tools though. Just get those as you need them.

    You'll probably want a decent pair of padded shorts. You don't really need cycling-specific clothing beyond that.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    16
    Thanks every one for all the suggestions. I read all the answers thoroughly and it's been a great help.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    16
    I Can't decide on the shock pump.

    Both of these pumps are priced same (with the shipping included) around 32$ so which one is better in the long run, considering I might upgrade my bike next year. Are these shock or manufacturer specific ?

    Sette Air 2 ST-35 Universal Shock Pump from price point
    Barrel: Aluminum
    Gauge: Precision 1.5" Analog (Encased for Better Protection)
    Hose: 5" Long External Swivel Hose for Easy Engagement
    Valve Release: 2-Stage Non-Leakage System
    Pressure Tuning: Bleeder Valve Button
    Handle Material: Plastic
    Capacity: 400 psi / 30 bar
    Added Features: Rotating Hose
    Dimensions (L x W x H ): 26 x 6.3 x 5.7 cm; 10.25" x 2.5" x 2.25"
    Weight: 240 g / 0.53 lbs

    Topeak Pocket Shock DXG pump

    Capacity: 300 psi / 20.7 bar
    Size (L x W x H): 8.5" x 1.7" x 1.8"
    Weight: 177g

  18. #18
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,318
    The scuttlebutt is that they're all the same pump. Given that the Topeak pump weighs 63 g less, that seems a little unlikely.

    They pretty much all use a Schrader valve and require the adapter to be screwed on. They should all make a seal before disengaging the valve. One of the big variables is just the gauge itself. A lot of current suspension components use much lower pressure than air forks and shocks did when they first came out. If there's room, it seems to make a better fork/shock. So I'd be leaning toward the Topeak, assuming the lower capacity means the gauge has a little more precision. Unless it doesn't have a hose. I could see that being incredibly irritating. Or, if you actually need to air up to over 300 psi.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    16
    Thanks for the suggestion. Just placed an order for Topeak pump. Have a goodt weekend !

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    The scuttlebutt is that they're all the same pump. Given that the Topeak pump weighs 63 g less, that seems a little unlikely.

    They pretty much all use a Schrader valve and require the adapter to be screwed on. They should all make a seal before disengaging the valve. One of the big variables is just the gauge itself. A lot of current suspension components use much lower pressure than air forks and shocks did when they first came out. If there's room, it seems to make a better fork/shock. So I'd be leaning toward the Topeak, assuming the lower capacity means the gauge has a little more precision. Unless it doesn't have a hose. I could see that being incredibly irritating. Or, if you actually need to air up to over 300 psi.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nubster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,103
    Not to hijack, but any other shock pump recommendations? I need one since I unretired my old air fork for my single speed and my new bike has an air shock (Lefty) too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

Similar Threads

  1. just beginning to ride, any necessary accessories?
    By thaxtonj88 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 02-12-2014, 07:28 PM
  2. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-24-2011, 05:27 PM
  3. Bike accessories
    By C.M.S in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-23-2011, 03:44 PM
  4. Bike accessories
    By C.M.S in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-22-2011, 05:49 PM
  5. Got my bike. Need my accessories..
    By gemini9 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 04-28-2011, 03:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •