1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    What bike do I buy?

    Recently a friend of mine and I decided to take up mountain biking. So being new I'm looking into getting a bike that I can both start with and not out grow. I will not be competitive, I'm looking for something solid that I can use both for mtn biking as well as casual street riding.

    I've looked into all kinds of bikes and found two Gary fishers at a local shop that seem rather good to me as a new person and great deals. I wanted to get some feedback on if you think it's worth buying one of these or looking into a different direction.

    What i found is: Gary fisher hifi retail of $1700 selling for $1300 and Gary fisher hifi plus retails of $2100 on sale for $1400. After playing around with several bikes I have decided I want a full suspension bike.

    Any help is much appreciated.

    Thanks,

  2. #2
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    I love the HiFi, it's a really fun bike. I don't think you'd regret buying one. One thing you may not enjoy is riding it on the streets. Pavement eats mountain tires up pretty quickly, and full suspension isn't needed on roads. I'd take that couple hundred you're saving on the sale and invest it in a path bike or cruiser or something without rear suspension (or any suspension) for the road. It'll save needing to constantly buy very expensive mountain tires all the time or having worn tires on the road.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
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    If you're a beginner, just be prepared to take care of the equipment and maintain it, especially in the price range you're looking at.

    I'd suggest hardtail, but you're set on full suspension, and it's not my problem, anyhow.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum
    I love the HiFi, it's a really fun bike. I don't think you'd regret buying one. One thing you may not enjoy is riding it on the streets. Pavement eats mountain tires up pretty quickly, and full suspension isn't needed on roads. I'd take that couple hundred you're saving on the sale and invest it in a path bike or cruiser or something without rear suspension (or any suspension) for the road. It'll save needing to constantly buy very expensive mountain tires all the time or having worn tires on the road.

    Good feedback, thank you. Could I not buy street tires and run it on the same bike though and lock the suspension?

  5. #5
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    of those two bikes i would spend the extra $100 and get the plus... it has some better components on it and you would spend well over $100 upgraded the hifi to get to the plus spec list.

    As for road riding take a look at craigslist for a cheap bike you can use on the street, as said above these bikes are not the best or most practical for road use and you are better off buying a used bike for cheap.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitz
    If you're a beginner, just be prepared to take care of the equipment and maintain it, especially in the price range you're looking at.

    I'd suggest hardtail, but you're set on full suspension, and it's not my problem, anyhow.

    I looked into both hardtail and full suspension, I settled on FS. because of my height weight and body aches I already have. I figure it'll be easier for my delicate sensibilities

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirjbling
    Good feedback, thank you. Could I not buy street tires and run it on the same bike though and lock the suspension?
    Absolutely, but changing tires just to go on a street ride is a huge PITA. A better solution is buying a backup wheelset mounted with slick tires and switching them when you want to ride road. Only thing I would caution you on is switching wheels may mean needing to adjust the brakes. The best way to minimize that is buying another set of wheels with the same hubs.

    What kind of street riding are we talking about though? Rides to the corner to get beer and groceries or extended sorts of road rides?
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

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