1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
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    New question here. What is the best mountain bike for women?

    Hello Everyone

    I've decided to buy my first bike and i don't have a clue about brands or anything really. So i need opinions or suggestions from anyone

    Im looking at the new K2 T:Nine Skyline but i cant find any reviews on the bike.
    The other bike i was looking at is the specialized hardrock disc for women but it's a bit pricy for my budget but the reviews are great!

    If anyone has any recommendations for mountain bikes designed for women i would love to know.looking to spend around 400-600 on a bike.

    Thank you for the help!

    Jackie
    Last edited by fuzion143; 06-13-2008 at 12:12 PM.

  2. #2
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    My wife got the Specialized Myka Comp. After riding a few different frames, this one fit her the best. One of the medics I work with is an avid roadie and recently purchased a mens mountain bike. She didn't get a good fit on any of the women's desings. You should be able to get a good hardtail in your price range, they will have similar component sets. Ride as many as you can, men's and women's to see what fits the best.

  3. #3
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    Gary Fischer makes a genesister line for women. Shorter top tube, lighter shocks. If you are over 5'6", a mens bike will fit you fine. Try some out.

  4. #4
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    A friend of mine has an older Trek WSD bike (women's specific design). Hers is a trek 4500 and she had a shop add some disc brakes for 100 bucks. She loves it. I've let ride my trek 4300 because we are about the same height, but she loves her WSD trek 4500.

    I'd say try the gary fisher womens specific models and the trek WSD models.

  5. #5
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    There are quite a few women's specific bikes out there. I am praying my daughters will get the bug for mountain biking and start riding a lot. I will buy them a tricked out pink and purple women's specific bike. I have actually tried to encourage them by showing them bikes on the internet that I would buy for them if they starting riding a lot.

  6. #6
    jalopy jockey
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlepito
    Gary Fischer makes a genesister line for women. Shorter top tube, lighter shocks. If you are over 5'6", a mens bike will fit you fine. Try some out.
    What? It has nothing to do with height it has to do with what parts are longer most women are leggy, so they need shorter top tubes for the overall size, also the bars are typically narrower.

    There are some women who would ride a non women branded bike better and there are men that would fit better on a bike with flower petals, not flames.

    My wife rides a Trek 4500, and loves it she tried the Fishers, and many others and they were too long in the top tube for her. I find everything except fishers to be too short in the top tube.

    Bottom line the one that fits is the right bike. Just remember a mountain bike is more bent over than most non cyclist people like / expect a bike to be. think the high bars on comfort bikes. Trey a few at a few shops and find the shop you like.

  7. #7
    The Martian
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    Find a bike that fits. Go to several bike shops and have them talk you through fit while you try bikes that are close to your size that they have (hopefully several!). Don't be afraid to sit on something you can't afford; that brand probably has a bike of similar or identical geometry much closer to your budget. Find a shop you trust and stick with them. Don't get stuck on "women's specific" geometry. It could be just what the doctor ordered or it could actually be a worse fit than a "unisex" frame depending on your body type. Try both, pick the one that feels better.

    The most important measurement for fit is the "effective top tube length" or the distance you reach from the seat to the handlebars. This can be tweeked with stem lengths and bars, but you should try to find something close off the bat and don't go too long!!! Standover (clearance) is secondary, but still important; how much clearance you really need is subjective and dependent on what you are comfortable with and what you are riding (I'm 5ft, I've learned to be comfortable with comparatively little clearance...but I've learned I can't live with the wrong top tube measurement!!!)

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