1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
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    what is all this fuss about bike weight savings???

    i don't understand why all that fuss with the bike weight savings...

    if you have 2 bikes with the same light wheelset, and they have a 2 kg difference, it is easier to lose 2 kg from your body weight than the bike.

    why do so costly changes in the bike that will save 1kg and not do a diet and lose 1 kg????

    weight either on the bike (not the wheels, cause then it is 2x the weight of other bike components/frame) or the body itself, is the same.

    moreover losing body weight helps in downhill sections because the standing weight is lowered, and so fatigue in the legs is less.

    if someone is quite thin, then ok, save bike weight.

    but 1,80 guys with 85kg, better save $ and lose 1-2 kg of body weight (easy task)!!!

    what ya think?


  2. #2
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    On the bike it's unsuspended weight. That makes a huge difference especially in MTB. You can try putting 2 kg on the bike and attacking some roots, then move the weight to a backpack and ride the same roots. Day and night difference.

    On the bike the weight does nothing to help you pedal. Think about a situation where you stand up to mash and have to pull on the handlebar: weight on your body is weight on the pedal. Weight on the bike is just weight you have to haul along.

    Of course there are extremes, but weight on the body is not the same as weight on the bike.

    EDIT: I'm not a crazy weight weenie with my bikes and I'm 189 cm tall with 72 kg body weight. So I believe my opinion is rather unbiased.

  3. #3
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    Weight on the bike can make some difference but IMO some people do worry about it too much and the law of diminishing returns comes in to play.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  4. #4
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    I don't believe this subject has ever been covered before. We should discuss it further
    2008 Redline Monocog 29er SS/Rigid
    2013 Marin Mount Vision XM7
    FS: 26" Black Flag Expert Wheelset (new), Reba 29 Fork

  5. #5
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    Your premise of a light wheelset on two different weight bikes doesn't happen.
    Manufacturers put a good wheelset on only at the top end of a line where the bike is already very light.
    As an upgrade the front wheel, tire and fork make the most noticeable difference in handling improvement from weight removal.

  6. #6
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    Saul Lumikko

    if i understand correctly, you mean the unsprung mass. this has only to do with weight of wheels and of suspension elements.
    if the weight saved on the bike isn't in these elements, then it has no differnce if it's eg in the crankset or in your belly...so i don't understand your point.

    in the second paragraph you are correct, but this only applies partially in a manual or wheelie or endo....in every other situation (drops, jumps etc) weight is weight.

  7. #7
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    I don't have much bodywieght to loose. when you weigh 145 pounds, lugging a heavy bike around is difficult. people take it way overboard though.

  8. #8
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    Re: what is all this fuss about bike weight savings???

    Why is bike weight or body weight exclusive? Can't I lose weight on my bike at the same time I'm riding and losing weight on myself? We only talk about bike weight on MTBR, show me the diet sub-forum. It doesn't exist. This makes people like the op think that we're only concerned about bike weight but it's obvious you're missing half of the conversation.

    Losing weight on the bike is fun BTW. It involves our beloved toys and our obvious insatiable appetite for parts and just talking bikes. We are enthusiasts on an enthusiast site, right?

    I am 195lbs and 6'3". I ride a very nice 23lb FS 29er. Why? Because I can. I also lose weight every now and then just from riding.

  9. #9
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    Silentfoe you are off subject.

  10. #10
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    For me in my early years of bmx when guys were riding burly chro. Mo frames I learned that the lighter the bike the more I could throw it around and therefore made me be able to do some tricks easier.... For example I had a built up s&m that was beast at the skatepark but i couldn't whip the thing around like my full blown bmx mongoose solution that bike was so light and agile that most my friends learned how to do 360s on that bike.... I couldn't pull off a 360 on my s&m even though it was a great bike

    Push ahead 15 years now its all the rage to have the lightest setup possible.... Because it makes sense.... 2 grams won't break the bank but a pound will in my eyes... It's all about balancing strength with weight and weighing the options it's

    My 2 cents

  11. #11
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    If you just ride flat trails/roads that just go up and down without obstacles, then it doesnt matter weather you take off frame weight or belly weight.

    The fact of the matter is mountain biking, at least the mountain biking I do, there are many obstacles, there are jumps, there are drops, the are rock gardens, there are tight switchbacks, etc.

    The closer the weight is to your body's center of mass, the easier it will be to maneuver. If you dont believe me, try an experiment.

    Get a 25lb weight and swing it around in your hand close to your body. Now extend your arm and swing it around. Now attache it to a 2.5ft stick and swing it around. That should show you the difference between belly weight and weight on your bike.

    Now as far as climbing a smooth hill goes. Weight off the body and weight off the frame doesnt make a noticeable difference.
    2008 Redline Monocog 29er SS/Rigid
    2013 Marin Mount Vision XM7
    FS: 26" Black Flag Expert Wheelset (new), Reba 29 Fork

  12. #12
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    Ground breaking thread. I just got back from a road ride after swapping from 23c's to 28c's on my road bike and I can assure you the extra 1 pound in rotating mass makes a huge difference.

  13. #13
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    4.5lbs is a lot of weight to loose, and would definitely make an in your face difference. A rider loosing 4.5 lbs after riding would feel noticeably difference than a loosing weight off the bike. I ride with many clydes than can out-climbed many skinny riders, it's not about weight, it's fitness.

    If lighter body weight translate to faster climb then the theory failed. More weight but better fitness is better than lighter weight any day, it's simple physic.

    Usually this kind of threads started from a few type of people, one who could not afford the upgrades, sourgrapes, or trolls. Which one are you?

  14. #14
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    I raced last week on a gorgeous 26" steel hard-tail. I raced the same course this week on a 5-lb lighter 29" carbon hard-tail with carbon rims. My time improved 5.25% between the weeks.

    There are other considerations of course - I had someone on my tail this week, so I may have been pushing a little harder, but I didn't slack off last week. The carbon bike is stiffer (designed as race bike), and the 29" wheels rolled better over the roots. On the other hand, I don't own a 29" bike, so I'm not used to a 29'er, which could have slowed me (the wide handlebars in the tight trees definitely slowed me).

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sundace View Post
    if i understand correctly, you mean the unsprung mass. this has only to do with weight of wheels and of suspension elements.
    if the weight saved on the bike isn't in these elements, then it has no differnce if it's eg in the crankset or in your belly...so i don't understand your point.
    Having suspension on the bike doesn't mean you stop using your arms and legs as well... So weight on the body is still different than weight on the frame for example. Of course a 14 kg full suspension bike will be faster through rocky sections and roots than a rigid bike of same weight.

    Quote Originally Posted by sundace View Post
    in the second paragraph you are correct, but this only applies partially in a manual or wheelie or endo....in every other situation (drops, jumps etc) weight is weight.
    No, it applies everytime you stand on the pedal and pull up the handle bars. It could be a strong acceleration or riding uphill while standing. Weight on your body is weight you can put on the pedal to help you go forward and you don't have to pull on the bar that much. Weight on the bike does nothing at all for you when you go uphill. Of course if you're pedaling seated, then weight is weight.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    I ride with many clydes than can out-climbed many skinny riders, it's not about weight, it's fitness.
    Not exactly true.
    If that clyde maintained the same fitness level but lost 20 lbs he would be even faster.
    So yes, it is about fitness level but weight also plays a factor.

    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Usually this kind of threads started from a few type of people, one who could not afford the upgrades, sourgrapes, or trolls. Which one are you?
    Or maybe a guy who can afford it but just can't afford to throw money all willy-nilly at a bike without justifying the returns. It is a legit question in the beginners forum so maybe he is a beginner who just needs an understanding.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Not exactly true.
    If that clyde maintained the same fitness level but lost 20 lbs he would be even faster.
    So yes, it is about fitness level but weight also plays a factor.
    No doubt, but they just deal with what they've got. They are weekend warriors and in a pretty good shape for 225-250lbs 6'+ fellas. Agree if they are lighter they'd be faster.

    Quote Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    Or maybe a guy who can afford it but just can't afford to throw money all willy-nilly at a bike without justifying the returns. It is a legit question in the beginners forum so maybe he is a beginner who just needs an understanding.
    There's something for everyone, but somehow light components get the bad end of the deal. I don't think people would just throw money all willy-nilly at the bike. There are many types of people of course, but without those who seek the lightest, newest, greatest there would be no trickling down effect to the more affordable models that all of us can enjoy. The SLX crankset has more options as well as look and feel better than the older 960 XTR cranks for less than half the price, thanks to the introduction of XTR and people who supports the products.

    Since OP made it clear that's it's about weight on the bike VS weight on the body(see the respond to silentfoe, which is a legit point loosing weight on while on the bike) I'm just telling you the 4.5lbs off the bike would feel better than 4.5lbs off the body there's no if, and, or, but, about it. From my experience, an average weekend warrior rider need to loose 12-15 lbs on the body to feel equal to 4.5lbs off the bike, all things especially the wheels being equal.

    Loosing body weight from riding the bike is one way to ensure that the more you ride the more weight you'd loose, the better your fitness would be, and it would make the rider faster and stronger. Loosing 4.5lbs off the bike make the bike much more responsive and pep, can't say the same about loosing same weight on the body, the bike would not feel as pep, til like I said 12-15lbs then your same body feels like it's turbo charged. Then again it's gradual and not as in your face as dropping weight on the bike as you can see the instant change.

  18. #18
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    Weight reduction in the body is alot easier. Even myself being 6' and 178lbs if I have a good week, hit the gym 4 times and stay away from the excess beer or treats I tend to notice the weight difference on the long rides and especially the climbs. An area that I don't think people consider is their choice of clothing and gear. I see some people loading up on tools, snacks and gadgets for a 15-20 mile ride. Excessive amounts of water in the cameback makes a big difference as well. I live in SoCal where it is pretty warm almost all year and I have no need fo 6L of water on a 1-2 hour ride. Just my 2 cents on the discussion.

  19. #19
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    Working out to lose weight is easier than whipping out the credit card? Wow, whodathunkit?

  20. #20
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    Hey Sundace, Next local demo day take out a carbon bike and give it a ride. I cant tell ya if a fork and wheelset would make it faster/easier but.... I got pretty lucky and got to ride a coworkers s works bike yesterday and giving his bike cost way more then mine and my truck combined I was expecting more, It felt just like a new bike lol. Basicly felt like a refined version of mine just twichier, Just nicer in every form. Easy to ride, I didn't feel like I was any faster until one climb I some times struggle with. That was the only time I felt the 10lbs may have been worth the extra dollars. At the end of the lap I looked a his cateye and Had busted my first lap time by 3 minutes compared to the lap I just finished a hour and a half befor on my bike. So after that find I cycled threw the computer and noticed a few things, My average was up almost 3mph but my highest speed was slower. Would I buy a $$$$$ bike to be faster, heck no. But is 10 lbs noticeable, Forsure.

  21. #21
    Cleavage Of The Tetons
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    Why oh WHY do so many people find it impossible to spell ' LOSE ' correctly?
    Loose with their spelling?
    "We LOVE cows! They make trails for us.....

    And then we eat them."

  22. #22
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    "But is 10 lbs noticeable, Forsure." - 0,5lbs is noticeable for experienced rider.

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