1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Weight Reduction advice

    Ok, I would love to hear from the masses on opinion to get the biggest bang for you buck in reducing weight on your ride. I have had my bike for 2 months and love it. I am not sure I have to change anything, but I would like to reduce the weight to make it even more nimble. It is about 29 lbs now stock, so what are the best things to upgrade.change to get big weight reduction that would still give bike strength. I don't jump, but I love singletrack with rocks, roots, small climbs/desents. Thank you in advance for your help........any by help, recommendations. NOTE: I have a Scott Spark 70 with 26" wheels.

  2. #2
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    The most impact will probably be wheels. Rotating mass has a gyroscopic effect so weight reduced in the wheels will fell more than say carbon bits of bling elsewhere.

    Just changing tyres, maybe running tubeless if not already - a quick and easy start




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD

  3. #3
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    Any advice on wheels and tires? I run on mostly sand, roots, small rocks and pine needles. I will do pavement when I am not on trails.

  4. #4
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    A co-worker I bike with told me that it's cheaper to lose weight in your gut, than it is to lose weight on your bike! Which is basically true.

  5. #5
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    Bang for buck? Do you mean are their cheap ways to drop significant weight? Probably not.

    New lightweight wheels are not cheap, nor is a new lightweight fork. But if you can find a used SID, for example, then it might qualify as an economical upgrade. The XC32 on the Spark 70 weighs 5 lbs while a SID come in at around 3.

    How much does the rider weigh? Dropping 5 lbs on a bike costs a grand or more. Free if you take it off the rider.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  6. #6
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    JasonScottCarter, that is probably true, but I hear about weight reduction on bikes all the time. I am looking for guidance on what is the best path to take on doing that. Wheels make sense, but what else will give you a good bang for the buck, and not just a cool looking factor.

  7. #7
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    Spartacus- You may want to peruse the Weight Weenies forum, as well. Lots of discussions, ideas and build details regarding this topic.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  8. #8
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    joe, thanks for the direction. I will definitely give it a read.

  9. #9
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    +1 for wheels and rider weight. Personally I would love to get some carbon handlebars, and various other lightweight components but my wallet is already on a diet lol.

  10. #10
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    On my3700 trek i worked alot of OT last month i got some new forks ditched the suntours and got some rockshox tecon silver dropped about a pound,changed tires lost a little weight as well as happier with the new tires.And last got rid of the stock bars for carbon ones(stock bars were pretty darn heavy compared to the carbon).it aint much but i feel a difference when i ride it compared to before.

    Still new at this but was enough for me to notice.

  11. #11
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    +1 for wheels, you will also get better engagement with a good hub that will feel real nice when riding the roots are rocks you are talking about. I like the Chris king ISO hubs but there are lots of good ones for more or less $ depends on what you value.

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I quit snacking and reduced some of my portion sizes. It's definitely helping.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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