Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 57
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21

    Weight reduction

    I need some help with a 06' specialized sx trail 2 I got off of Craigslist

    I ride with an AM/FR setup and I'm new to the sport of mountain biking. It seems real heavy compared to the trek 4300 ht I used to ride. I need some help taking off some weight, because It's getting unbelievably hard to climb. I have about $400 to spend and the bike is mostly aftermarket, so I don't know what I should spend it on.

    Specs:

    06' specialized sx trail frame
    Fox van r 160mm fork
    Fox dhx 5.0 shock
    2 spd 22/36 Truativ Hussfelt cranks
    Sram x0 10 speed derailleur
    Sram x7 front deraileur
    Sram x9 shifters
    Specialized demo bars
    Truativ hozzfeltzer stem
    Avid juicy 7 brakes w/ 203mm rotors
    Wellgo mg1 pedals
    Blackspire stinger chain guide
    Specialized chunderer 26x3 front/Parnacer smoke classic 26x2.1 rear
    Sram 1070 cassette

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,691
    Wheels is where to start .They can make a huge impovement.

  3. #3
    Parking Lot Poser
    Reputation: mtbmatty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    390
    I think this may be a heavy chassis to begin with.

    Wheels & tires are always a good place to start when trying to shave weight, but with a limited budget..... Put the $4 hundy under your mattress so you can bet on the Super Bowl
    feelin good is good enough

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    This bike compared to any HT is going to ride heavy; it must weight close to 37lbs.

    The geometry with a longer wheelbase will also require more effort for climbing; making it feel even heavier. You could try and adjust the shock mount to change the head angle by 1deg.

    Otherwise I would save your money and ride it more; you will strengthen your body and might even like the feel of the bike; especially on the way down!

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,747
    What's your goal?

    That spec list reads like a sensibly equipped AM/FR bike. I don't think you're taking a lot of weight off it for $400 unless there's some really silly thing that weighs a lot that's part of it. If you're interested in freeride, a heavy-ass bike is something you get to learn to live with.

    Go for a couple rides on the 4300 too. Maybe you should try to get your money back out of the SX trail and look for a more balanced setup.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    I'm thinking about wheels, but I want something under 200 and from what I see, there aren't many in that price range

    Any suggestions?

    Here's a pic

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Weight reduction-image.jpg  

    Last edited by too many components; 11-15-2012 at 11:47 AM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    What's your goal?

    That spec list reads like a sensibly equipped AM/FR bike. I don't think you're taking a lot of weight off it for $400 unless there's some really silly thing that weighs a lot that's part of it. If you're interested in freeride, a heavy-ass bike is something you get to learn to live with.

    Go for a couple rides on the 4300 too. Maybe you should try to get your money back out of the SX trail and look for a more balanced setup.
    Problem is that I got this bike used, it just came back from a tune up and it's been a while since I brought the bike home.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbmatty View Post
    I think this may be a heavy chassis to begin with.

    Wheels & tires are always a good place to start when trying to shave weight, but with a limited budget..... Put the $4 hundy under your mattress so you can bet on the Super Bowl
    I'm thinking on buying the WTB Bronson 26x2.35

    What do you think?

  9. #9
    Never Forget 9-11
    Reputation: FujNoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    432
    Looking a the pics I'd guess most of your weight is in the frame, wheels/tires, and fork. Wheels and tires will get some weight loss but for $400 your options are very limited. Does the bike suit the needs of your local trails and riding style? If not, I'd suggest selling and looking for another if weight and climbing are concerns.
    It's such a fine line between idiocy and genius.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    What do you think about a used fork from ebay?

  11. #11
    ready to ride
    Reputation: mattnmtns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    837
    I think everyone thinks you are not going to significantly lighten up that bike for $400. It is what it is, which is a heavy duty downhill/FR bike. Its never going to be a light XC bike.

  12. #12
    'Tis but a scratch
    Reputation: huffster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,770
    3500 calories = 1 pound. You could eat less, ride more, save $ and shave 5 pounds off the rider in just a few weeks. Just sayin'.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by huffster View Post
    3500 calories = 1 pound. You could eat less, ride more, save $ and shave 5 pounds off the rider in just a few weeks. Just sayin'.
    35,000 calories = 10lbs (10-20 weeks)

    Well, that's my short term goal anyhow. That is about half the weight of my Cannondale Trail and a third of the weight of my KHS XC...and it' free. Now I did install some lighter low resistant tires which really helps a lot.

    One thing I have noticed is you really need to ride 60-120 minute a day 3-5 a week at least in order to see a noticeable weight loss. I was rode 30-40 minutes 5 days a week for a month an didn't notice any real gains. So I added an additional 20-30 minutes and hit pay dirt.

  14. #14
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,747
    Fox has a good reputation for sensibly constructed forks. I doubt you're doing a lot better.

    With wheels, you can have any two of light, cheap and durable. While you could get lighter wheels for $400, I don't know that they'd be appropriate to AM/FR.

    I wasn't really suggesting you could return the bike to the person you bought it from to get your money back out of it. If it's not for you, part it or sell it.

    What kind of riding do you like, anyway?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,378
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    I need some help with a 06' specialized sx trail 2 I got off of Craigslist

    I ride with an AM/FR setup and I'm new to the sport of mountain biking. It seems real heavy compared to the trek 4300 ht I used to ride. I need some help taking off some weight, because It's getting unbelievably hard to climb. I have about $400 to spend and the bike is mostly aftermarket, so I don't know what I should spend it on.

    Specs:

    06' specialized sx trail frame
    Fox van r 160mm fork
    Fox dhx 5.0 shock
    2 spd 22/36 Truativ Hussfelt cranks
    Sram x0 10 speed derailleur
    Sram x7 front deraileur
    Sram x9 shifters
    Specialized demo bars
    Truativ hozzfeltzer stem
    Avid juicy 7 brakes w/ 203mm rotors
    Wellgo mg1 pedals
    Blackspire stinger chain guide
    Specialized chunderer 26x3 front/Parnacer smoke classic 26x2.1 rear
    Sram 1070 cassette
    I think you are wasting your money trying to lighten this thing up. It is what it is (an awesome burly AM/FR bike). The frame, fork, rear shock and wheels are all heavy (for a reason), Replacing any of these with ones that are lighter but still perform as well is going to be VERY expensive per gram saved.

    Continuing to crank this thing up the hills and your resulting strength as a rider is going to make WAAAAY more difference then the few pounds you might manage to shave off this bike for $1000.

    If you were looking for a pedaling friendly all-rounder, then you got the wrong bike. This bike is made to go big on the DH, and just do what it takes to get it to the top, and don't be in a hurry. If this does not sound like what you want, I would sell it and get something better suited to your needs.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  16. #16
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Drill holes in the frame.
    The bigger the holes the more weight dropped.

    I suggest a 1/4" drill bit because anything bigger is just ridiculous.

    Other than getting rid of rotational mass you just won't gain a lot of bang for the buck.

    Rotational mass = everything that spins.

    After that, you will get the same results in dropping the same weight from your own ass.

    BTW, my current bike is about 4 pounds heavier then my last and I can ride further and better on it. Unless your life is measured in 1/10th's of a second, spending tons of money to drop a few pounds off anything other then rotational mass isn't going to help you.

  17. #17
    Gumnut Peddler
    Reputation: Grinderz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    368
    I am hoping that the hole drilling in frame suggestion was a tongue in cheek sugestion/joke.
    Burning fat, not oil.

  18. #18
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    If you were looking for a pedaling friendly all-rounder, then you got the wrong bike. This bike is made to go big on the DH, and just do what it takes to get it to the top, and don't be in a hurry. If this does not sound like what you want, I would sell it and get something better suited to your needs.
    ^^^^ THIS! Fully agree with it.

    I'll take your rear mudguard and put it on my SJ...thats weight reduction for you, and a cleaner bike for me.

    To be honest, I think I am in the same boat, wondering how my 07 S-Works SJ FSR has bloated to almost 30 lbs when it should be coming in at 25-27....(or am I on crack?).

    -S

  19. #19
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Quote Originally Posted by Grinderz View Post
    I am hoping that the hole drilling in frame suggestion was a tongue in cheek sugestion/joke.

  20. #20
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    What do you think about a used fork from ebay?
    You've already got a pretty good Fox fork. Can't shave much weight off there if you're doing a good amount of FR.

    -S

  21. #21
    Rogue Exterminator
    Reputation: kjlued's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,956
    Other weight reduction tips.

    Get a sawzall and cut bits of the frame away.
    Cut down the seat post....better yet, get rid of it and the seat all together.
    Remove every other spoke from the wheel. Especially good because it reduces rotational mass.
    Remove brakes. You won't need them when pedaling uphill and they only slow you on the down hill.

  22. #22
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,158
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    I think you are wasting your money trying to lighten this thing up. It is what it is (an awesome burly AM/FR bike). The frame, fork, rear shock and wheels are all heavy (for a reason), Replacing any of these with ones that are lighter but still perform as well is going to be VERY expensive per gram saved.

    Continuing to crank this thing up the hills and your resulting strength as a rider is going to make WAAAAY more difference then the few pounds you might manage to shave off this bike for $1000.

    If you were looking for a pedaling friendly all-rounder, then you got the wrong bike. This bike is made to go big on the DH, and just do what it takes to get it to the top, and don't be in a hurry. If this does not sound like what you want, I would sell it and get something better suited to your needs.
    ^^^This

    It would ride different than you HT for sure, SX is way better on the descend, no comparison. If you want to do AM then take this bike, someday you feel like XC then take the HT out. Save your money for a lighter trail bike for all of the days in between

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    I think that the front tire is going to be replaced next. It's a hefty 26x3.0 and it probably going to be replaced by a 26x2.5 or 2.35

    What to you guys think?

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    I could probably get a used Fox tallus off eBay

    I wonder how much weight that will shave...

  25. #25
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,747
    I think if you're really going to do this, you should spend some quality time with a spreadsheet and a scale. Find out how much each part actually weighs.

    I'm still dying to hear what kind of riding you do.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  26. #26
    T.W.O.
    Reputation: mimi1885's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    8,158
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I think if you're really going to do this, you should spend some quality time with a spreadsheet and a scale. Find out how much each part actually weighs.

    I'm still dying to hear what kind of riding you do.
    Yeah, I agree. That's a 8lbs+ frame I wonder how much weight can you really bring down.
    Check this 2009 SX trail out and go from there.» 2009 Specialized SX Trail I - Sick Lines – mountain bike reviews, news, videos | Your comprehensive downhill and freeride mountain bike resource

  27. #27
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,378
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    I think that the front tire is going to be replaced next. It's a hefty 26x3.0 and it probably going to be replaced by a 26x2.5 or 2.35

    What to you guys think?
    You sure that Chunder is a 3.0 and not a 2.3?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  28. #28
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,378
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    I could probably get a used Fox tallus off eBay

    I wonder how much weight that will shave...
    About a pound. You won't even notice it on this bike.

    You are totally not listening to us, are you?
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  29. #29
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    I could probably get a used Fox tallus off eBay

    I wonder how much weight that will shave...
    Not much - my Talas is just a hair under 4 lbs (32mm). Then again going to a 32mm shock from 36 would cut down some weight. Take note that you may need a new front hub or a wheel if you can't find a Talas with 20mm TA, so you have to consider that cost. Changing that large axle out would also reduce the weight though.....


    -S

  30. #30
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,747
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    About a pound. You won't even notice it on this bike.

    You are totally not listening to us, are you?
    We're not giving very agreeable answers.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  31. #31
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    We're not giving very agreeable answers.
    Fat lot of help we are.

    -S

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bikerjohn64's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    162
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    We're not giving very agreeable answers.
    Perhaps the OP should divide his $400 among the posters here and not ride with it in his pocket. That should lighten up his rides ;-)).

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,599
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    I think that the front tire is going to be replaced next. It's a hefty 26x3.0 and it probably going to be replaced by a 26x2.5 or 2.35

    What to you guys think?
    What do people think? They've told and you aren't listening so why keep coming back and asking?

    Look to be blunt YOU BOUGHT THE WRONG BIKE!!!

    Don't waste your money. You have $400, save it, sell the bike for what you can and buy something else more suited to your riding!

    That's the reality of your situation.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    808
    If your doing alot of climbing then perhaps you shold get a FS XC bike and not a FR bike or find a hill with a lift up and ride down and let gravity do its job.
    Giant XTC 2 29er
    KHS Flagstaff 29er FS
    Neon Bow Trials Bike
    Norco Fluid 9.2 29er FS
    Norco BIGFOOT FATTY

  35. #35
    Fat-tired Roadie Moderator
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    17,747
    I don't know if the OP bought the wrong bike. That's why I keep asking what kind of riding he does! Maybe he mostly rides up fire roads and then bombs downhill singletrack. Then it's the right bike and he just needs to get over the climbing.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    16
    A couple years ago I was looking to shead some weight off of my motorcycle thinking I could drop lap times with a lighter bike. Best advice I got was from a pro-racer who listened very closely to all my thoughts on parts I could swap out to decrease 5-10 lbs from the bike and then replied with "or you could start jogging or biking".

    When looking to drop weight off a mnt bike, my first instict is not to change parts and spend more money; but to pedal more... harder... and often. I guess if your already sitting below 8% body fat then it might do you much good, but most of us in the 'beginners corner' are no where near in that shape.

    just my .02

    good luck with your upgrades.

  37. #37
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,378
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I don't know if the OP bought the wrong bike. That's why I keep asking what kind of riding he does! Maybe he mostly rides up fire roads and then bombs downhill singletrack. Then it's the right bike and he just needs to get over the climbing.
    Good point

    It may not be the bike, but rather his expectations.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  38. #38
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    1,101
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Good point

    It may not be the bike, but rather his expectations.
    The expectations should be at least realistic if the OP wants to do AM/FR mix. The bike is built for FR bombing runs and if he's considering a lighter/weaker fork it's more of an upgrade for the AM bits he likes, at the expense of lost teeth.

    These are probably two contrary requirements - light or strong (factoring in cost). Go light, and you'll lose strength. Stronger parts = less damage risk but will lead to harder pedaling uphill. For me, I'd choose less damage - it's less painful. LOL.

    The best, common sense advice in this thread that the majority of us in here share is to get fitter and lose some pounds that a lot of us carry on our bodies.

    -S

  39. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    808
    I would say like everyone else, ride more get stronger. I know in the spring my bike feels like its 100 lbs by fall it weighs nothing, fitness is your key.
    Giant XTC 2 29er
    KHS Flagstaff 29er FS
    Neon Bow Trials Bike
    Norco Fluid 9.2 29er FS
    Norco BIGFOOT FATTY

  40. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by fahza29er View Post
    , fitness is your key.
    Absolutely!

    My FS bike weighs 30lbs but felt closer to 100lbs when I started. I was lucky to ride one Loop on my trail (1.8miles) and had to stop twice every time for a breather. Fast forward 8wks and I'm racing through 5 Loops on my FS bike doing 2 laps (10.5 miles) working on adding a third lap (15-17miles per day Mon-Fri). Light weight parts are nice, but I wouldn't mess with much more than say tires and a seat until you start dropping weight. Think about your heavy parts as sand bags adding resistance to your work out.

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    5,599
    Quote Originally Posted by 50calray View Post
    Absolutely!

    My FS bike weighs 30lbs but felt closer to 100lbs when I started. I was lucky to ride one Loop on my trail (1.8miles) and had to stop twice every time for a breather. Fast forward 8wks and I'm racing through 5 Loops on my FS bike doing 2 laps (10.5 miles) working on adding a third lap (15-17miles per day Mon-Fri). Light weight parts are nice, but I wouldn't mess with much more than say tires and a seat until you start dropping weight. Think about your heavy parts as sand bags adding resistance to your work out.
    Weight of the bike alone isn't all of it, same with fitness.
    What bike do you ride?

    The suspension makes a huge difference. If you're on a 30lb XC bike designed to pedal well, you can't compare that with a 30lb FR bike that's not designed to pedal well at all.
    Climbing on the two will be very different and even if you're fit, climbing on the FR will still suck.compared to the FR bike.
    Ibis Mojo 3
    Carver 420 TI
    Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    467
    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Weight of the bike alone isn't all of it, same with fitness.
    What bike do you ride?

    The suspension makes a huge difference. If you're on a 30lb XC bike designed to pedal well, you can't compare that with a 30lb FR bike that's not designed to pedal well at all.
    Climbing on the two will be very different and even if you're fit, climbing on the FR will still suck.compared to the FR bike.

    I'm not comparing bikes nor different form of mtb riding. I used my 30lb bike as an example of weight. My point is this, in stead of spending a $100 on a light weight seat post and a $100 light weight stems etc, loose 10lbs of weight. You're going to see a more recognizable difference from a 10lbs body weight loss than you're going to see shaving 20-30grams off your bike parts.

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Snfoilhat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    449

    $400

    I think that your bike is 0.5 pounds too light.

    Get a dropper post and ride the hell out of it. I haven't ridden the 2.3 Chunder but I'd swear by the 2.3 Butcher and would run that tire on any trail bike's front end no matter the weight penalty. Good fork, high-quality drivetrain with smart gearing. Perfect bike for the social-pace climbing and push-your-limits descending that stokes so many people on mountain biking these days.

    Yes yes yes, the burly but still svelte cutting-edge enduro superbikes are better. But you pay for every gram shaved off a 6" bike with cash. And diminishing returns kicks in pretty fast. Who cares if your climbing efficiency is 5-20% lower? (FYI, I have made these numbers up).

    A 34 pound '11 SX (4" air, not SX Trail) has become my daily trailbike, and while I have to admit it is pretty slow on the Internet (34 pounds! Mercy!), it is surprisingly fast and supremely fun in real life.

    I'm not just being jerky with this post. You have a 22/36 low gear, you can climb anything. If you can get the bike to fit well. Good saddle position, and a good, well-fitting saddle. Figure out if you need setback or zero-setback for your body. Then figure out if you can get away w/ a standard post (not a lot of seat tube on the SX, so not a lot of place to put all that post for the descent). If there isn't enough seat tube to get the saddle out of the way for descending, then you know to get a dropper.
    Last edited by Snfoilhat; 11-16-2012 at 02:53 PM.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I think if you're really going to do this, you should spend some quality time with a spreadsheet and a scale. Find out how much each part actually weighs.

    I'm still dying to hear what kind of riding you do.
    Mostly XC until I got this bike. Then I went to Tahoe once (enjoyed it) and now I'm riding the more challenging trails in the area. Once In a while I go to the bmx park and sometimes stairs and drops at the local park...

    It starting to rain now and that sort of kills the chance of me riding

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    You sure that Chunder is a 3.0 and not a 2.3?
    Yep, it's a 3.0

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Not much - my Talas is just a hair under 4 lbs (32mm). Then again going to a 32mm shock from 36 would cut down some weight. Take note that you may need a new front hub or a wheel if you can't find a Talas with 20mm TA, so you have to consider that cost. Changing that large axle out would also reduce the weight though.....


    -S
    Thanks for the info

    Probably not going buy another fork.

  47. #47
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    13,378
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    Yep, it's a 3.0
    OK, that might be worth switching out.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  48. #48
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: Hardluckhero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by too many components View Post
    It seems real heavy compared to the trek 4300 ht I used to ride.
    That's because it IS real heavy compared to the Trek 4300. If you like it, ride it, you'll get stronger. Save the $ for lift tickets and shuttle costs.
    Cholla cactus=nature's guard rail.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bataivah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    654
    Keep that for a great gravity bike and dont even mess with it really. Or flip it for a good xc/am bike.
    But that bike is made to be heavy and heavy duty and would be a shear waste to bother imo.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    21
    I need help picking out a fr/dh wheelsets under 1850g
    Needs to be under $500/set

    Thanks for the help

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •