1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Which way to lay bike down?

    Is there an accepted direction to lay a bike down on the ground?
    On my old bike I used to always lay it chain side up so as lessen the risk of damage to the derailleur... but now with disc brakes I'd worry about warping a rotor.

    So which way? Rotors down or derailleur down?

  2. #2
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    Usually lean the back wheel on something so it stands up but if nothings around on the rotor side for sure.
    the strongest trees grow on the windiest plains... ~Tone's

  3. #3
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    rotor side but make sure it rests on the seatstay instead of the rotor.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    You're going to warp a rotor sooner or later if you ride hard. Don't sweat it.

    (And yeah - still the left side. Things don't stick out as much as the derailleur cage.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Standing is the best way but if you have to lay it down make sure is laying on the non drive (left) side.

  6. #6
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    Left side down. Lay mine that way all the time. Nary a problem. Often the pedal holds the back end off the ground. The chainstay should be enough to protect the rotor, if you're at all careful.

    Tweaked hangers end up being the source of many shifting problems that I see. You're doing the right thing in not wanting to slam your derailleur into the dirt.

  7. #7
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    Either way if I'm taking a downhill hairpin curve too fast and have to lay it down to avoid a tree or going over a cliff.

  8. #8
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    Rotors are cheaper than derailleurs, so I lay it left side down, if at all. Given a choice, I prefer to lean it up against something instead, keeping it upright.

  9. #9
    AZ
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    If it cannot be stood up, non drive side.

  10. #10
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    why are you laying it down? is your kickstand broken?





























































  11. #11
    Nickel Havr
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    Quote Originally Posted by square View Post
    why are you laying it down? is your kickstand broken?
    Bwahahaha!!!!

    Thats funny right there!
    Quote Originally Posted by William Blake
    Great things are done when men and mountains meet. This is not done by jostling in the street .

  12. #12
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    To me it doesn't really matter. I don't let it fall to the ground, so placing it gently down on the rear derailleur isn't a big deal for me. My rear der gets way more abuse from just riding. It's not like they are made of glass.

  13. #13
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    Get a Walmart bike. They have kickstands. Problem solved.

  14. #14
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    I want to get a double kickstand, unsure of correct ter. I've seen them on carego bikes, big dummies, etc. Keeps the bike more upright which is useful for loading and unloading. More stable than just 1 leg.

  15. #15
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    my sister, whom I haven't seen in a long, long time was recently in the area and she saw my bike and asked why I have a rack for storage and wondered where the kickstand was

  16. #16
    Trail Ninja
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    I always lay my bike down on its left side, on the pedal with the crank arm at 12 o clock and on the end of the left grip. On clean dry ground, preferably dirt or grass not covered in snow or whatever.

  17. #17
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    Either is just fine, if you lay it down gently, the pedal generally takes most of the weight. I fall off on both sides and, in 15 years of mountain biking have only ever bent/broken two rear mechs or hangers both during big crashes, normally the mech is pretty well protected by cranks, pedals etc.

    This is particularly true for the newer shimano "shadow" rear mechs

    Try placing your bike gently in the ground on both sides and hopefully you'll see what I mean and you can put your mind at rest. But, yes, generally, leaving the bike leaning against something and on two wheels is best where possible

  18. #18
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    Just don't throw it down, it'll be fine.

  19. #19
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    What about upside down? Is that bad?

  20. #20
    B42
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    Quote Originally Posted by konetiks View Post
    What about upside down? Is that bad?
    When I wrecked earlier today it was perfectly upside down on the handlebars and seat when it came to a rest. I'm assuming it wanted to be that way, so it should be fine.

  21. #21
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Upside down can have some undesired consequences, like scuffing on the top of the saddle or damage to the controls.

    I used to work on my bike this way all the time. Just pay attention to where it's contacting the ground. A friend of mine gave me back a road bike with some very annoying scratches on the tops of the shifters because she did this (probably a lot) in a cement-surfaced garage.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by B42 View Post
    When I wrecked earlier today it was perfectly upside down on the handlebars and seat when it came to a rest. I'm assuming it wanted to be that way, so it should be fine.
    I think your bike is telling you something, considering that's the "emergency maintenance position".

  23. #23
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    Well, I live in a apt. Complex. We keep our bikes in a giant closet. AKA the spare bedroom that we Swore would be the entertainment room but a year and a half later still remains entertainment-less. It's carpeted so I don't have worry about scratches.
    Last edited by konetiks; 08-15-2011 at 05:25 AM. Reason: Spelling

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by B42 View Post
    When I wrecked earlier today it was perfectly upside down on the handlebars and seat when it came to a rest. I'm assuming it wanted to be that way, so it should be fine.
    It just wanted its belly rubbed.

  25. #25
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    I don't know if there is any truth to this, but a bike repair guy told me that storing bikes upside down over a period of time was not good because it could cause problems with the hydraulics in the brakes as well as problems with forks that have oil dampening systems.

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