1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
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    Idea! Want to build a nice mountain bike for trail riding picked my frame have $600

    I would like some suggestions and pointers on some part I DO NOT WANT TO BUY A PREBUILT BIKE! $600. Heres my frame.Cheap Cofidis C8 MTB Bike Frame Alloy Hardtail

  2. #2
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    I've put together quite a few bikes over the years, and seriously, my suggestion to you in that price range is not waste your time and money trying to build one up. You're going to end up with a lesser bike and it's going to cost you more and eat up a lot of time. Not remotely worth it IMO.

  3. #3
    Redcoat
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I've put together quite a few bikes over the years, and seriously, my suggestion to you in that price range is not waste your time and money trying to build one up. You're going to end up with a lesser bike and it's going to cost you more and eat up a lot of time. Not remotely worth it IMO.
    It's worth it if he likes building bikes...

    You donít have to buy brand new parts, you can look at used which youíll have to with a budget like that to end up with something half decent. Itís definitely not necessarily a waste of money just be wise with what you buy. just make sure you donít rush procuring components and look for a good deal on each. You are not wasting time spending time on your own personal bike that you can be proud of.

    Youíll probably find however as you build youíll go over budget. This can also be a plus though as you can spread cost out over time and build it one piece at a time.

  4. #4
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    You're right, as long as he's willing to go over budget and hoping to spend a a lot more of the foreseeable future shopping and wrenching rather than riding. A first time build for low $$ is going to take a good amount of time, tools, and straing at a computer screen, and the end result is likely to not all that great. I personally would rather be riding.

  5. #5

  6. #6
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    600 is not set in stone its how much i have at the moment a little about me im 17 and home schooled i work a minimum of 28 hrs. a week so money is not a problem. I want that sense of ya i got to choose the parts that i want and work best for me. But what about a forke was thinking rock shox i will not buy fox way to much money! so just point me to different parts that you all like so i can take a look. Thanks.

  7. #7
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    It can be done for your budget. I built up a hardtail a few years ago for around $500, but the build was done over several months and I scoured like crazy for good used part deals and got some dirt cheap and even free hook ups from friends. Depending on the parts you select, a suspension fork and wheels can take up most of that $600 budget, if not all of it.

    If you've never built a bike before and don't have much experience in wrenching, keep in mind you have to buy parts that are compatible with one another (NO tapered steerer tubes in 1 1/8" frames, keep suspension travel appropriate to the frame, proper bottom bracket selection, etc...) and factor into your budget any specialty tools for part installs and like the other guys said, be prepared to spend a lot of time bargain shopping and researching to get this build done.

    I've built multiple bikes over the years and with complete bikes coming pretty nicely spec'd these days, I would suggest just saving a little more and buying a pre-built bike and then upgrading it as you see fit. You'd have a warranty, be riding sooner, and probably have a nicer bike overall.

  8. #8
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    Since the budget you have dictates that you rely on used and donated parts it's really difficult to give useful advice. The budget may indicate mechanical brakes but you are more likely to get used hydros because there are more of those being discarded out there in the mtbr world. In other words you have to take what you can find and not what people advise you to look for.
    I'd probably look for a frame-compatible donor bike within your budget and then build the new bike from the cannibalized components.
    May also want to join a mountain biking club and let it be known that you are building on a budget. People may give you or sell for very cheap their discarded parts (assuming you are actually poor and not just cheap :-).
    Also see if someone offers a bike mechanic class nearby (high school, vocational school, community college). Talk to students and teachers about your project.
    If you want to do this for fun then have fun doing it. But if you want to do this to save money then you very likely won't. To end up with a "nice" bike you'll spend so much time looking for parts and making this work that it would be cheaper to work those hours for an employer and then spend that additional money on better parts along with your $600. IMHO

  9. #9
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    well i have my old full suspension bike yet to ride until then im ordering all my parts in January and building it by that time i will have a good $950- $1000.

  10. #10
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    No offense, but from reading some of your others posts you haven't much of a clue yet about bicycles and their parts yet, so trying to properly put together a build that will work will end up costing you lots of money, time and headache, best advice honestly, you'll be much better off buying a new, complete bike like the Seeker or Goblin from Airborne. Once you've got your new bike go visit Park Tools and read up on their tutorials about fixing and repairing bikes, maybe buy their repair book and some basic bike essential tools and practice working on your new bike if it needs it.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
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  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Go to a bike coop. Piece your frame together from what they've got there - get it to go, stop, and shift. That should leave you with most of your budget intact.

    You can probably stick a Recon Gold on the front. You'll probably find there are some parts of your co-op build that work really poorly. Use the rest of your budget to swap out that stuff.

    It'll be a bit of a Frankenbike, but it should ride nicely when it's working. And hey, you wanted to learn about fixing things.

    You could also cannibalize a bikesdirect bike.

    Why that frame? It doesn't look any better than what a $600 complete bike would have. No intention of being offensive, just a question.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    I'd say go for it. Building your own bike from the frame up is a great experience. You need to do thorough research about part compatibility, but it's not rocket science. Bicycle have quite simple/elegant mechanical designs in the end, and this kind of project is perfect for a home schooled high school student IMO. You didn't mention any part of your budget for tools, or labor. Getting all the right tools will easily run you $200+, and there are some jobs you'll want your LBS to do (e.g. if BB shell needs facing, or installation of non-integrated headset). The way to circumvent these costs is to find your local bike co-op, as AndrewSwitch suggested, where you should have access to a workstand, tools and expertise for low or pay-what-can can type cost.

  13. #13
    The Fastest of Bananas
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    As a beginner, i dont suggest it. You'll blow your budget on tools, getting headset pressed in, parts you didn't anticipate, etc

    Not to mention, you have to go so low end on parts, you wont have anything decent and have to upgrade more later. 600 for all new parts is nothing.

  14. #14
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    If you want a halfway decent fork, you're going to have to add a good bit to your budget. Look around at what's available in your area on the used market and whatnot. I tried finding a decent used fork for my wife's old bike and couldn't find squat for appreciably less than retail. Ended up getting her a whole bike for a MUCH better deal.

    I've built my own bikes, too. These builds ALWAYS go over budget. Set a price goal and add at least 50% to it. My first build went at least 100% over budget. Second time around, I didn't set a budget. I got what I wanted within reason, and simply spread the purchases out over a long enough period that I could afford it. My next build will be getting exactly what I want. No budget.

    A few things are budget killers.
    1. Buying incompatible parts, then having to buy the correct part and sell the original for a loss because you buggered it trying to make it fit, or even used it before realizing it was the wrong part.
    2. Having strong preferences for certain things, and a timeline to complete the build (such that you can't be patient and find the price you want for the item).
    3. The little parts you don't find discounts on very often like cables, tools, consumables (cleaners and lubricants, wear parts like chain, tires, etc), and labor for things you aren't skilled enough to do yourself, require specialized tools that you don't have or can't afford, and things you broke trying to install when you don't have the skill or the correct tools.

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