1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Upgrade V's New

  1. #1
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    Hope Upgrade V's New

    Hello

    OK here is the dilemma. I have a Trek 4300 (with a Marzocchi MX Comp ETA fork) and have been riding it for about a year now. But the time has come to replace a few bits, hydraulic discs and better gear system which will cost about additional 350. But you still end up with a Trek 4300.

    Or do i put this money toward something like a Giant Trace 2 1500. The thing is that recently i crippled my back on my hardtail so i was thinking that a full sus might be the way to go, since i am getting into rougher and rougher terrain.

    The Trance seems the way to go, but for a sport that i have only been doing for about a year (although really enjoy) is it overkill? I don't want to be the newbie with the shiny expensive kit but can't ride (if you get what i mean).

    So any opinions???

    Cheers
    Nik

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by nikstar101
    Hello

    OK here is the dilemma. I have a Trek 4300 (with a Marzocchi MX Comp ETA fork) and have been riding it for about a year now. But the time has come to replace a few bits, hydraulic discs and better gear system which will cost about additional 350. But you still end up with a Trek 4300.

    Or do i put this money toward something like a Giant Trace 2 1500. The thing is that recently i crippled my back on my hardtail so i was thinking that a full sus might be the way to go, since i am getting into rougher and rougher terrain.

    The Trance seems the way to go, but for a sport that i have only been doing for about a year (although really enjoy) is it overkill? I don't want to be the newbie with the shiny expensive kit but can't ride (if you get what i mean).

    So any opinions???
    Opinions abound here!
    When I faced the option of upgrading to disks, faced with hardware, wheelset, etc, I chose to simply upgrade. The amount of money that you put into that would not be recovered if you were to sell the bike outright afterwards, given teh amount of entrylevel bikes that now come with disks. When it comes down to it, properly setup Vs (Shim. XTs for me) worked as well as my first discs.
    The question you have to ask yourself is "how much do i wanna ride?" if the answer is MORE! then go ahead and upgrade - if you get a new bike, given no additional time constraints, you will ride more. I started riding 5 days a week when i got my new bike, mostly because it was sooo much more fun. And that riding more completely justified purchasing the bike - just think, if you stretch out that expenditure over the course of a year ($1200us for the trance), you would be paying only $23/week - for me that was only $4.60 a ride, or less than a dollar a mile on my local trail.
    Either way, spend more time on your bike. I don't regret upgrading bikes (same price range) and have spent a whole lot of time on the new ride...

  3. #3
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    I upgraded from a Specialized HardRock to a RockHopper after one season on the trails, and then the following season picked up a Klein Attitude Comp. Did I look like a poser? Probably. But with a bike you enjoy (and boy oh boy do I enjoy it), you ride more, get fit and develop your skillset faster than one that you're not that happy with.

    If you can stand the pinch, I'd say upgrade the few components that don't work well on your 4300 and either keep that around as a second bike or sell it for money towards your Trance. In the end, tho, I'm sure that everyone wants a new, shiny bike with all the bells and whistles. Isn't that what it's all about?

    Anyway, I'd say to upgrade your current bike if you're on a budget, get a new bike if you can afford it. But that's just me.

    Ross
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

  4. #4
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    It depends

    on the type of riding you are doing. The Trek 4300 is a beginner's hardtail, rather than upgrade it you could easily get a higher end hardtail for around $1,000 and then put a Cane Creek Thudbuster on it to eliminate the beating you're taking. Which would give you the benefits of a hardtail with some cushioning.

    Or, if you're going to do riding that requires a full suspension then go for the trance.

    Go test ride a higher end hardtail and a few full suspension bikes and see what feels better and smoother. And if some places let you rent the bike for the day take it and ride it hard for the day, then you'll have a really good idea of how the bike feels. Good luck.
    If you're not falling, then you're not riding fast enough!
    Ibex Asta Pro SE & Giant XTC-2

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