1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Two packs, bottle, and a pump to much?

    I am starting to think I have to much stuff on my bike. Right now I have a specialized seat bag with a tube, tire tools, and a patch kit in it. I also have a metal cage with a water bottle and a Park Tool micro pump. Right now I don't think I am adding to much weight, but I would also like to add a top tube bag for my phone and keys. Anyone else do this?

  2. #2
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    I have the seat bag with the tools and a tube....

    I use a water bottle and carry a pump....

    Keys, wallet, and phone go in the seat bag, or in a pocket.

  3. #3
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    I have a Nashbar frame bag that fits everything I carry, except a tube (haven't started carrying one yet).

    In the bag I carry:

    Pump
    multitool
    small roll of Gorilla Tape
    2 tire levers
    patch kit
    keys
    wallet
    phone

    When I get a tube I plan on stuffing it up under my seat in the rails, I used to carry one like that back in the day.

  4. #4
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    Actually...maybe I can strap the tube up under there instead of putting it in the bag. That may give me the room I need.

  5. #5
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    I have a small hydration/ back pack that I carry stuff in.
    I have a tube, pump, multi tool, a couple cliff bars, and my phone in the bag.
    Instead of carrying my whole wallet, I have an ID case that I keep my ID, insurance card, and a credit card in.

    Still have room in the pack for a few other things if I want such as a full lunch or maybe a couple beers.

  6. #6
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    Sounds about right. On longer rides I'll have a saddle bag with tools, tube, phone, two bottles in cages, and a small frame bag that has my pump and food in it.

    Much more comfortable than riding with a weighed down camelbak IMO.

  7. #7
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    I used to carry two bottles, but my bike is full suspension and one has to go underneath. It was fine until I did a 1x9 conversion...now I decided I want the extra ground clearance instead of the bottle down there.

  8. #8
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    I have two 20oz(591ml) water bottles. A carry bag that attaches to the frame and I have a small first aid kit, gloves, patch kit, and a tire pump attached to the frame. I am going to get a small pack that attaches to my seat post so I can put my spare tube in.

    I am still new in what to bring with me on my bike. I am concerned the more stuff that I add the more pain in the ass it's going to be when I go and do downhill. I am trying to refrain from carrying a pack sack on my back.

    If there is anything you fine people can suggest to carry with me, please post or send me a message.

  9. #9
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    A quick link /chain breaker , I carry a muti tool and a letherman. Some duct tape wrapped around something.

  10. #10
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    Mine may sound extreme, on a typical ride a backpack with :

    3 tire levers
    1 CO2 pump
    1 CO2 cartridge
    1 Hand pump
    1 Trek Bike Lock
    1 Micro USB phone charger
    Or
    1 iPhone charger
    Or both
    1 My set of keys
    1 multitool
    1 chain lube bottle (small)
    1 tube patch kit
    2 tubes (either 2 presta or 1P/1S)
    3 bottles of water or more
    1 bottle of energy or more
    1 thing of solid energy or more
    2 pants leg restraints
    1 pair if cold riding gloves
    2 pairs of tipless riding gloved
    (One pair of gloves will end up on me)
    1 of my 2nd smartphones I carry (batt backup)


    And sometimes:
    1 DSLR

    Colder weather adds:
    1 winter hat
    1 jacket (borderline temps)
    1 pair of winter gloves
    2 different types of Balaclavas

    I still need to add a good chain tool and links.

    I go on long rides, often stopping at different places like friends place, bars, parks etc.

    Sent from my MB865 using Tapatalk 2
    2012 Scott Spark 29 Team
    2013 Scott Scale 970
    2011 Scott Speedster S20
    1999 Specialized FSR Comp

  11. #11
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    I cary a tube, multi tool, and co2. All in my seat bag with room for keys, phone, ID and credit card. I use a hydro pack. I dont see any use for a pump. But thats just me.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stiffler3182 View Post
    I cary a tube, multi tool, and co2. All in my seat bag with room for keys, phone, ID and credit card. I use a hydro pack. I dont see any use for a pump. But thats just me.
    I used to carry only CO2, but I found unlimited air with ability to know and set pressure more valuable. The pump was lighter than CO2 setup anyways.

    I recently added the CO2 and 1 cartridge to avoid a major hand pump workout and a recent double flat experience that took a lot of energy out of me on a really hot day.

    Sent from my MB865 using Tapatalk 2
    2012 Scott Spark 29 Team
    2013 Scott Scale 970
    2011 Scott Speedster S20
    1999 Specialized FSR Comp

  13. #13
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    You can fit a ton of stuff into jersey pockets that in the back. I go back and forth between camel backs and water bottle. I can fit a water bottle into my middle jersey pocket. All my tools into another pocket and my phone, gps and car key (note, I take it off the rings and leave the rest in the car) into the other pocket.

    Another thing I've done in the past is to have all the basic tools in a seat bag on both my mountain bike and my road bike. That way I never have to bother with relocation tools from one bike to another.
    I like to ride bikes.

  14. #14
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    Patch kit pump and multi go in the camelback with the 2l bladder and if I feel the need I put a bottle on the bike

  15. #15
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    That bag I have on my bike holds a ton. It has an expandable bottom. In the main pocket I carry a tube, first aid kit, tire gauge, gel packs, phone, keys, snack bar. In the underneath section without it being expanded I have 3 tire levers, patch kit, a pair of tweezers with a built in light and I have room for a multi tool which i need to purchase. Again, that's without it being expanded.

    The bag is kinda heavy with all that stuff. Probably about 4lbs. Pump is light. Bag is also nice because it has a twist lock so i can take it on and off instantly.

  16. #16
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    I have found that it isn't just the amount of stuff you are bringing with you it is the weight and where that weight is. Obviously the lighter the better. If you are a weight wienie or not, less weight helps. I used to have a couple of bags on my bike with all my gear and water in cages. I found it made the bike more sluggish, It just didn't move as well under me with all my gear. Hence lighter bikes/frames/components being more desirable. I have since moved as much as possible into a hydration pack. I don't feel the weight as much when its on me and can compensate for it more easily. I have also learned to tailor what I am bringing to the ride, who I am with and how far we are going to be from the trail head. You don't need the kitchen sink for every ride. Here is what I typically bring...

    Hydration pack (Rogue) with:
    - 70oz of ice water (no additives)
    - 1-2 Gels
    - 3 tire levers
    - tire patch kit
    - human patch kit (couple band aids)
    - small, light, basic multitool that includes a chain tool and has the tools your specific bike needs
    - bill fold with a CC, ID and a little cash
    - key and fob for my car, removed from the other keys
    - toilet paper. 8-12 squares is light and hey, you never know.
    - cell phone (some rides, not all)

    On the bike:
    - Blackburn pump
    - duck tape wrapped around seat post several times (very useful in many ways)
    - small under saddle bag with a tube, secured snugly so it doesn't move
    - 12oz water bottle with homebrew energy/electrolyte drink (some rides, not all)

    For longer rides, riding with my kids or people who don't bring anything:
    - 100oz hydration pack with more storage (MULE)
    - a 26er tube as well as the 29er tube for my bike (and a 20" tube if my younger daughter is with us)
    - food
    - a real first aid kit (I always bring it when with the kids are in tow)
    - more "involved" multitool or additional tools, not just for your bike but others as well.
    - 24oz water bottle(s) in cages
    - tire pressure gauge
    - small flashlight
    - handlebar and tail lights if there is any chance of being caught on the trail in the dark. (even the cheap ones can be a life saver if you are in a pinch)

  17. #17
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    I used to carry stuff on my bike, but hated how it made noise as it bounced around.

    So I carry the follwing in my camelback.

    100oz of water
    26" tube
    mini-pump
    patch kit (incase of 2nd flat)
    Topeak Alien Multi tool
    Mini pliers with led flashlight. ( for removing cactus thorns from tires or riders legs, yes did this a few weeks back for friend)
    links for the chain.
    Small section of chain (5-6 links)
    rag for wraping tube and chain
    cliff bar
    car keys (if needed)
    phone with GPS active to record the ride
    paper map of trail
    wash cloth to wipe sweat off my glasses.

    This my standard kit that lives in my camebak all the time.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  18. #18
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    Ive been throwing the idea around of riding with a camelpack again, but managed to lose mine in the move. I guess I'll have to buy a new one. This time I'm getting one with a dry pocket.

  19. #19
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    Yea i don't like having a bunch of stuff on my bike either, like to keep it light to be able to throw it around easier.

  20. #20
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    Good topic, as I am just getting back into riding and wondering what I should be carrying. I thought I was in the minority with the frame mounted pump, and strangely enough, had to use it on the first ride after installing it.

    Can you guys list what bags you are running with your replies? Thanks.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sickmak90 View Post
    ......This time I'm getting one with a dry pocket.
    a ziplock baggie can suffice for this and you don't have to try and fit everything into a specific pocket. Features like that come at a price premium as well. Use a sandwich sized one or a gallon sized one depending on your needs. You can swap the baggied item to another pack, a jersey pocket or duct tape it to your frame and have it be equally as water tight.

    Quote Originally Posted by hawkeye680 View Post
    Good topic, as I am just getting back into riding and wondering what I should be carrying. I thought I was in the minority with the frame mounted pump, and strangely enough, had to use it on the first ride after installing it.

    Can you guys list what bags you are running with your replies? Thanks.
    Another good resource is stickied in this very subforum.
    Mountain Bike Ride Packing List

    I am considering removing my pump from my frame and lashing it to my pack. It gets a lot of dirt and mud on/in it on the frame and I worry it wont' last long under these conditions. A buddy suggested I put a condom on it to keep the crap off of it. That would be awkward while riding with my two daughters though.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DECIM8 View Post
    a ziplock baggie can suffice for this and you don't have to try and fit everything into a specific pocket. Features like that come at a price premium as well. Use a sandwich sized one or a gallon sized one depending on your needs. You can swap the baggied item to another pack, a jersey pocket or duct tape it to your frame and have it be equally as water tight.



    Another good resource is stickied in this very subforum.
    Mountain Bike Ride Packing List

    I am considering removing my pump from my frame and lashing it to my pack. It gets a lot of dirt and mud on/in it on the frame and I worry it wont' last long under these conditions. A buddy suggested I put a condom on it to keep the crap off of it. That would be awkward while riding with my two daughters though.
    LOL. Grab one of those umbrella condoms at the entrance of Walmart and cut to fit. I may do that this afternoon, as my pump got pretty nasty the last ride.

  23. #23
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    I have a couple of bikes. Used to put stuff in the bag under the seat, but decided I either would need two sets of everything, or I would forget to move the stuff over from one bike to the other.

    So now I put the few things I use in the pockets of a hydration pack and I carry that hydration pack whenever I ride either bike. I put my small pump also in the hydration pack's pocket. I don't carry too many things - couple of energy gels and Powerbars, small multi-tool, some bandages/anti-infection spray (had a few good falls!), a few zip-ties, a tube, my wallet, phone and a small pump. All of that fits fine in a fairly small CamelBak, and I also don't need to use any water bottles on the bike.

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