1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Trance X0 Feeling Broke

    So I have been wanting to get into mountain biking and finally took the plunge and bought a new bike. I went into my local bike shop after deciding on a Giant Trance X2. I didn't want to spend more than around $1500.

    Sadly I was not firm enough with my budget and ended up getting a 2008 Trance X0 for $2800. I am hoping that was a good deal and don't regret my purchase.

    What is supposed to come with this bike? I got an owners manual and a handpump for the shocks. But I thought I read there is supposed to be a wheel kit included, of which I didn't get.

  2. #2
    spec4life???..smh...
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    I really like the look and feel of the trance bikes. Maybe one day....

    Nice ride man, and dont worry about the price now just go ride and enjoy!

  3. #3
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    One more question, the owners manual is very generic and not specific to the Trance X0, how do I make various shock setting adjustments. They showed me at the bike shop but I thought that info would have been included in an owners manual.

  4. #4
    R.I.P. DogFriend
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    To set up the shock, start with the main air chamber and use the o-ring on the shaft to measure sag while you are sitting on the bike in riding position with your gear on (camelbak if you have one too). 30% sag is a good starting spot, meaning that if you have a shock with a 2' stroke that the shock should go down 0.6" with you just sitting on it. Make a note of what presssure setting works best for you.

    That should be a good starting point. After you take a good hard ride, check to see it the o-ring has moved down far enough to indicate how much travel you are using. To get the most from your suspension, you should be using very nearly all of the available travel. If you're not, try using a slightly lower air pressure setting until you get very close to using all of the travel. If it's using all of the travel, I would add more air until you are not quite using all of the travel.

    As for the rebound setting, I would start with it in the middle and then see what sort of feedback you get from riding it. The red dial under the propedal knob and lever is your rebound setting.

    If the rear is bucking you up off of jumps, you can slow the rebound down (toward the "+" setting). If the shock feels like it is packing down (not rebounding quickly enough) through rough high speed sections of trail, you may want to speed up the rebound (toward the "-" setting). No single rebound setting is perfect for all situations, so try to find a setting that is a good compromise for your particular riding style.

    If you have the XO, you have the Fox RP23. If so, that is a very nice shock that is very responsive to external settings. Use the small top knob (pull it up, turn it and push it back down) to select any of the three propedal settings (high, medium or low) for climbing to minimize bob, then use the lever to turn propedal off while descending or back on for climbing. That is the intended use, but you can use it any way that suits you.

  5. #5
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    You're most likely not going to find component specific sections in your manual because components come from different manufacturers and can be swapped out. Giant can't be responsible for writing up a manual to cover the full range of possibilities. That is why it is feeling generic to you I would guess. Im sure if you're having trouble with a fork or deraileur or the like you would be able to contact the company that makes that specific part and see about getting the corresponding manual.

    I'm in a similar situation to you. I am returning to MTB after a very long time and searching for my first bike. I had settled on the $1200 price range...and then the $1500...and now I want a Banshee Scirocco in the $2000 price range. It never ends.

  6. #6
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    Each of the manufacturers will have an owners (and usually a service) manual on their website for each component. It's a pain, but is worth downloading each one.

  7. #7
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    Probably the dealer shouldn't have talked you up to $2800 from $1500 if you aren't familiar enough with the components to know why you spent that much, and to set up your shock. OTOH, the X0 has VERY NICE components. By next year you'll be loving the bike, and you won't even give a second though to the price. (You'll be thoroughly spoiled too, and will probably never want a mere $1500 bike again ).

    Ideally, I think your dealer should have given you an owners manual for your shock. The bike probably came with such a manual, but some dealers aren't too good about passing those manuals on to customers. You can view an online version of the manual at the Fox website, at the following URL:

    http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tec...008_om_eng.htm

    You can also grab the manual in PDF form from:

    http://www.foxracingshox.com/fox_tec...elpEnglish.pdf

    The same manual will have a section that covers your fork.

    Bicycle owners manuals, btw, are almost always so generic as to be useless. They basically amount to: "wear a helmet and don't sue us". I usually toss my bike manuals. It's the component manuals that are the keepers.

    I don't have a Trance X, but I've ridden one. They really are nice bikes. And you do have a top-notch set of components in the X0. You have XT front deraillers and shifters. XT is high-end, and my personal choice when it comes to Shimano-brand components. That XTR rear derailler is even higher-end. It probably cost upwards of $200 all by itself. Avid Juicy 7 are top-notch brakes, and you can fine-tune your brake-pad distance using those red knobs on the levers.

    What I'm saying is: don't second-guess yourself on the bike. Ride it. Because it really is a very nice bike. It's probably significantly lighter than the X2, and you won't regret the light wweight when climbing hills.

  8. #8
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    Hey, one more thing. Go to the Giant website and grab their suspension-setup manual:

    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/backof...de20070609.pdf

    Look at the "Air Shock Equipped Sag Recommendations" on page 18. The table on that page shows the Trance X as having 127mm of wheel travel. That translates into 44mm of shock travel. Giant's sag recommendation is 25-30%, which is 11-13mm as measured using the o-ring on the shock. When you just sit on the bike, you want that o-ring to move out somewhere between 11-13 mm. That's a good starting point. You can stray a bit from there, depending on how you like the bike to feel.

    I was hoping that Giant would give a set of recommended air-pressures by body-weight. Some manufactures give those, and they are nice as a starting-point.

    One last thought. If I were you, I'd go back to the dealer and ask them for a lesson on setting up your rear shock. You just dropped almost three grand with them. They more than owe you a few minutes to be sure you know how to set up the suspension.

  9. #9
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    this might help

    call the LBS and ask what time you could drop by for a refresher in fork/shock setup. they should be more than willing on a $2800 purchase, as I'm sure they will be.

    It takes a while to learn to set up stuff, and constant change by manufacturers and marketing departments keep us all fiddling for perfect setup. You'll get there, it takes a bit of time.

    For example, the fork is to soak up bumps, while maintaining as much ground contact as possible for traction. Over time, you will learn to "feel" what's working on different terrain, and make adjustments.

    What should you expect? Hopefully a large grin will overcome your buyer's remorse and feeling of being left alone by the LBS. Get them involved, they'll be glad to help you as a happy client returns to spend even more unbudgeted money.

    cheers, Jim

  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the help!

    My bike shop really was good to me, I just didn't understand all the terms right away and didn't let them know that. While I did tell them it had been years since I purchased a new bike, I told them I didn't want a low end model as I really wanted to get into the sport. I am sure they would be more than happy to help me set it up, I would rather just do it myself so I can learn about the bike.



    So did I spend to much for an X0?

    Was a wheel kit supposed to be included with my purchase?

  11. #11
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    One more thing, the O-ring used for measuring adjustments on my rear shock is badly cracked and looks as if it is about to break (surprising for it being a brand new bike). I know I can measure adjustments without it but I would like to keep using an O-ring. How do I replace it? Is it just a matter of disconnecting the rear shock from the bottom?

  12. #12
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    o ring

    yes you can just remove one end of the shock and replace it, or just use a small zip tie.

    I don't know, nor have I heard of, a "wheel kit" with a new bike. can you expand a bit? If you got the bike and it's complete, that's normal. I assume it has wheels.

    Jim

  13. #13
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    This is what I saw on another thread here:

    Did your Trance XO include the wheel kit that goes with the Mavic Crossmax ST i.e, UST valves, spoke wrench, wheel magnet, and bearing adjustment tool?

    As I didn't receive a wheel kit I had to ask.

  14. #14
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    It will only hurt once to spend the money...it'll feel great every time you climb on the bike. Also, there is a Giant specific forum where you might get additional info.
    "The quality of the box matters little. Success depends upon the person who sits in it."
    The Red Baron
    I need a better box

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Resist
    So I have been wanting to get into mountain biking and finally took the plunge and bought a new bike. I went into my local bike shop after deciding on a Giant Trance X2. I didn't want to spend more than around $1500.

    Sadly I was not firm enough with my budget and ended up getting a 2008 Trance X0 for $2800. I am hoping that was a good deal and don't regret my purchase.

    What is supposed to come with this bike? I got an owners manual and a handpump for the shocks. But I thought I read there is supposed to be a wheel kit included, of which I didn't get.
    For a newbie, you would have been just as happy with a $500 bike. An advance rider would have been thrilled with a $1500 bike, and might even notice the difference. The extra $1400 you'll never notice.

    Having said that, you can obviously afford it, so you might as well look impressive on your new bike! Now hurry up and learn how to ride it before you look foolish!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    For a newbie, you would have been just as happy with a $500 bike. An advance rider would have been thrilled with a $1500 bike, and might even notice the difference. The extra $1400 you'll never notice.
    Doh!


    Maybe so but at least I won't out grow the bike in 6 months. I really plan on getting into this sport for fun of it and my health.

  17. #17
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    From the mavic website:
    supplied with
    Bearing adjustment tool (rear wheel)
    BX601 quick releases
    Spoke wrench (rear wheel)
    Spoke wrench for aerodynamic spokes (rear wheel)
    User guide and warranty card
    UST valve and accessories
    Wheel magnet (front wheel)
    R/
    D

  18. #18
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    I can see getting all that if one purchases it as separate component but does Gaint include them with the bike purchase? Because I certainly didn't get them.

  19. #19
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    From the mavic website:
    supplied with
    Bearing adjustment tool (rear wheel)
    BX601 quick releases
    Spoke wrench (rear wheel)
    Spoke wrench for aerodynamic spokes (rear wheel)
    User guide and warranty card
    UST valve and accessories
    Wheel magnet (front wheel)
    R/
    D

  20. #20
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    Again, I know what the web site says.

    I assume you would get those extra's when you purchase component wheels from them. That doesn't tell me if they are included with the Giant purchase package of the Trance X0.

  21. #21
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    Dude, sorry that was a double post (not sure about the time difference). But since we're "assuming" and all...I assume you called your LBS and asked them if those things were supposed to come with the bike.

  22. #22
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    Not yet but I will. I am wondering however if anyone else that bought a Giant Trance X0 got these things included with their purchase.

  23. #23
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    Congratulations on the new bike! I love the Trances

  24. #24
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    I checked the Giant site and

    Quote Originally Posted by Resist
    Not yet but I will. I am wondering however if anyone else that bought a Giant Trance X0 got these things included with their purchase.
    this is all it says:

    rims Mavic CrossMax ST
    hubs Mavic CrossMax ST
    spokes Mavic CrossMax ST

    ...so if you don't have those on your bike, then the LBS should be questioned, unless they dropped the price due to a wheel swap.

    I've not heard of what was posted with bearing tools and such, a good question for your LBS. I think it's not standard and may be an offering by 1 LBS of the original poster, but caution I'm not sure on that.

    At the end of the day, it's not a show stopper, but it's worth finding out I guess.

    Good luck Jim
    http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...in/1288/29373/

  25. #25
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    The X0 comes with Crossmax ST wheels, there should be a wheel kit with it.
    Mike
    Toronto, Canada
    2014 Giant TCX SLR2
    2013 Trek Stache 8
    2011 Giant Defy Advanced 0

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