1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    14

    Total noob with questions.

    Hey all, so im a total beginner to the mountain biking scene and i just bought a Diamondback Response 08 and was looking for any tips or anything anyone wants to give me. I also am very interested in adding different better parts to the bike and want to know peoples opinion on the best things to do. Im sure im going to have tons of questions and i'll try and read the threads before i ask. Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    249
    The only thins I'd recomment upgrading on a new bike are the contact points, ie: grips, saddle, pedals, tires if any of those you feel are insufficient. Try not to upgrade components until you wear or break them as it leads to a condition known around here as upgraditus and you'll soon find you could have/ should have just bought a much better bike to start with. The best upgrade you can do is learning to ride, better to bust up cheap parts than expensive upgrade parts doing that. The second best upgrade is learning to repair and maintain your bike. The best components immproperly tuned will still be out performed by propperly tuned entry level components. Don't be intimidated by people who tell you that you have to have this or that. Your bike is a great starting point, just get out and enjoy riding.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    409
    For now just ride, have fun and ask more spacific questions as they arise. Answereing a spacific questions will benefit you more. As for upgrades, resist the urge. Ride for a while and upgrade your parts as they wear out or when they no longer meet your needs. When you do start upgrading buy the parts you want (do not settle for what will work). With my first bike I spent a lot of money replacing the same components over and over because I went with what I thought would work instead of what I knew would work. Start budgeting for the upgrades now because some of the components can be expensive (a good fork can cost more then many bikes).

  4. #4
    spec4life???..smh...
    Reputation: spec4life's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,093
    Most of the suggestions on this forum will point you to the direction of not upgrading and to just ride, while this is true and will increase your skill leaps and bounds above slaping on new componets I understand the desire to upgrade and find adding new parts to be parts of the fun and attraction i have to mtbing.

    As said before contact pionts first such as seat tires and pedals.

    If you do alot of xc and am riding look at some clipless pedlas such as the shimano m520

    Try to shed some weight and pick up some grip with a new set of tires such as the wtb velociraptors(not so much lightweight as grippy)

    And maybe most important find you a seat that can keep you comfortable on long rides.

    These are the three things i would look at first and beleive that the price/benifit ratio is highest .

  5. #5
    No good in rock gardens..
    Reputation: Sideknob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    3,824
    Don't waste money replacing parts at this stage - set the bike up to fit you properly for starters. Get the seat height right, the bars set up at a height that's comfy and suits your riding style, the tyre pressure right - then ride. The Response is trailworthy in stock trim.

    You'll need a few bits and pieces to help you out on the trail if things go wrong:

    - a spare tube and a patch kit.

    - a mini pump.

    - a multi tool that has allen keys, a chain breaker, and screwdriver attachments.

    - a SRAM powerlink is an easy way to fix a broken or damaged chain link, and cheap.

    - helmet and gloves

    - decent shorts to ride in, preferably proper lined shorts ie: lycra or lined baggies

    - suitable water supply (a Camelback setup is best, and hold all your repair gear)

    On the trail, play with tyre pressure and notice how it affects the handling of the bike - you might find the tyres work better if they are a bit softer than you'd expect to run them. It can make a big difference.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  6. #6
    tlg
    tlg is offline
    (enter witty phrase here)
    Reputation: tlg's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,250
    As Sideknob said, get the stuff for you, not the bike. Proper riding gear and repair tools are every bit as important as a quality bike. Pushing a $2000 bike 5mile with a chaffed a$$ while dying of thirst because you can't fix a flat really takes the fun out of biking.

    Regarding the bike, break stuff then replace it with better stuff.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    14
    Ive had the bike for three days now and have already put probably 30 miles on it. No real trails yet but mainly around the city and some light duty jogging/hiking trails. I've ordered a new seat, grips and a riser for the handlebars since i am 6'4 and seem to be leaning down too much. A seat just because my arse is just killing me and the grips are a bit uncomfortable already.

    I absolutely love the bike and riding it other than an incredibly sore bottom. Im very glad with the purchase and just cant stay off it.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    542
    Whoa, whoa, slow down... please tell us you purchased the bike from a shop that helped you with the correct size or, if you bought this elsewhere, that you bought it knowing what size to get. If it's the wrong size bike, you're dumping a lot of cash on something you can't fix. At 6'4", I'm guessing you probably have a 34" inseam - this necessitates a frame size of 18"-20" ("large" or "extra-large" depending on manufacturer). I don't mean to bum your trip but riding the wrong size bicycle is going to lead to more problems later on like sore knees, aching back, etc.

    Hopefully, if it is the correct size, then you just have to make some minor adjustments. As for the sore a**, it really is more of a conditioning thing... eventually, your sit-bones will become acclimated. As some have already mentioned, cycling-specific shorts will make a noticeable difference. Grips are just a personal preference much the way you'd wrap a tennis-racket. Riser-bars have different "sweeps" and different rises - keep in mind that if the steerer tube hasn't been cut, you most likely have spacers that can either raise or drop the height of the bars...

    Keep riding! Ride different locales and extremes. The more you ride, the more familiar you'll become with your bike and that'll help you decide just what to adjust, what to change and what to leave alone. . . the best part of it all is you're having a heck of a time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •