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  1. #1
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    Total beginner questions - new Redline Monocog 2009 29er SS

    I just picked this bike up and I LOVE it so far. Loving the singlespeed and the feel of the bike. I apologize if this is the wrong place to post SS questions, but I am a beginner.

    Questions:

    1. What basic things should I try to check / tuneup on the bike? The LBS I bought it from was a bit messy and its just one guy he didn't really do much tuning on it. It was in a back closet so I'd like to give it a little love. I should mention I'm totally new to this.

    2. I purchased it with *ONLY* the bike. It was a closeout so I understand but he didn't even give me a manual to read. I emailed redline so that should cover the manual but is there anything else that normally would come with the bike I'm missing.

    3. Chain tensioners - I'm confused. I read about using derailers but it seems like that's more for SS converts? What is the best method of tensioning? and where to buy? LBS? online?

    4. I noticed the brakes seem to be rubbing on the rim at times - like they are too tight. What is the best way to ensure they're installed properly?

    Greatly appreciate the help.

    Matt

  2. #2
    Pimpmobile
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    Nice bike!

    1) I would just make sure everythings tight and adjusted properly, like the headset, bottom bracket, brakes... Not much to these bikes.

    2) The owners manual is available on the Redline website, you shouldn't need anything else.

    3) The rear wheel dropouts are horizontal, all chain tensioning is done by sliding the rear axle forward or back. No need for a separate tensioner.

    4) You may need to have the wheels trued. You can turn the adjusters on the brake levers in (clockwise) to loosen them up a bit until you do.

    I've been considering picking one of these up.. I hear they're quite durable!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    Nice bike!

    1) I would just make sure everythings tight and adjusted properly, like the headset, bottom bracket, brakes... Not much to these bikes.

    2) The owners manual is available on the Redline website, you shouldn't need anything else.

    3) The rear wheel dropouts are horizontal, all chain tensioning is done by sliding the rear axle forward or back. No need for a separate tensioner.

    4) You may need to have the wheels trued. You can turn the adjusters on the brake levers in (clockwise) to loosen them up a bit until you do.

    I've been considering picking one of these up.. I hear they're quite durable!
    Thanks!!!!

    so there's not really anything I need to lube? what about in the future?

    "sliding the rear axle forwad or back" Sorry - how exactly do you slide it forwards or back? Do you just loosen that nut on the back wheel, move it forward or back and then retighten it?



    As for the bike, I am far from an expert but it really feels like a solid piece of machinery. I heard people saying it was heavy, but for me it really accelerates like nothing. Zooooom. I think I'll be riding this thing for a long time!

  4. #4
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    1. That's the cool thing about SS - there's not much to maintain.

    Keep the chain lubed - I wipe down the chain after every ride to keep the grime/dust off of it. Relube it every 40 miles or so unless it's mid-summer and really dusty, or we did some high country ride with streams that we had to cross, then it's a re-lube post-ride. Occasionally you might take the chain off of the bike, wipe down the cog (the rear sprocket) and soak the chain in some kind of degreaser like Simple Green. I use an old water bottle and put the chain in there, shake 'er up and let it sit for a while, then rinse the chain, dry it (you can just let it dry or use a compressor if you have one to blow the water out), reinstall and re-lube.

    2. Probably just a manual. Hopefully redline will be responsive.

    3. As stated, you don't need to worry about a tensioner or tensioning device. The area where the rear wheel mounts to the frame is called the "drop-outs". On a geared bike, you would typically find 'vertical' drop-outs - IE: the mounting area accepts the wheel vertically:



    Horizontal drop outs accept the wheel axle horizontally, like so:



    In a horizontal drop out, which is what your bike looks to have, you loosen the nut holding the rear wheel on, and can slide the wheel forwards or backwards to achieve tension. You don't want too much slack or you could throw the chain, which would suck, and you don't want too much tension as you can stress the chain, add friction/resistance to the drive train, etc, which also would suck. Basically if the chain can move up/down a quarter inch or so, you're cool.

    4. Wheel trueness probably isn't your issue. One major benefit of disc brakes is that the rotor is mounted at the hub, or center of the wheel, and the wheel being out of true is much less impacting than it would be say, with rim brakes. Most likely, if it's only hitting the rotor once or twice per revolution, the rotor is slightly out of true. My experience with disc brakes is that the rotor being out of true is a pretty frequent occurrence. You can use your fingers to pull the rotor or push it (depending on which side of the rotor is hitting the pads) to 'true' it a little. They also make a tool for it, but I've never used one. If you're rubbing constantly, either try making sure the wheel is centered in the drop out, or dial back the cable by turning it CLOCKWISE at the brake lever on the handlebar.

    Other than that, just ride the thing. My rigid single speed needs a chain wipe down as I described above, some air in the tires and she's ready to go again for another ride. Much less work than my geared bike, which, admittedly, see's much more wall hanging time than trail time these days
    :wq

  5. #5
    Pimpmobile
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    Just keep the chain clean and lubed. You'll eventually need to service the headset/bb/hubs.

    There aren't a lot of adjustments on that thing.



    Loosen the axle nuts, and slide the wheel so the chain is tight enough that you can deflect it about 1/2" midway between the chainring and cog.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the pictures that definitely helps. Basically just making the chain tighter by increasing the distance between the two wheels, cool beans!

    So as far as lube - is there any way to check that it was lubed at the factory or that the grease hasn't been corrupted while sitting in storage? If it looks greasy it's good? lol

    I definitely want to get disc brakes at some point. How much do they run for a good pair?

    Appreciate all the help

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by machx
    Thanks for the pictures that definitely helps. Basically just making the chain tighter by increasing the distance between the two wheels, cool beans!

    So as far as lube - is there any way to check that it was lubed at the factory or that the grease hasn't been corrupted while sitting in storage? If it looks greasy it's good? lol

    I definitely want to get disc brakes at some point. How much do they run for a good pair?

    Appreciate all the help
    Oops, I made an assumption that your bike had disc brakes already. Sorry :\ The rubbing occasionally then is likely an issue with the wheel being out of true. I'd have the bike shop correct that.

    Not sure on the 2009 spec, but the 2010 has disc brake mounts on the frame and fork, as well as hubs that can support disc. If that's the case with your bike, you should just be able to buy a set of disc brakes and mount them up. You can get Avid BB5 for cheap, like < $100.
    Last edited by nachomc; 05-10-2010 at 11:47 AM.
    :wq

  8. #8
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    Thanks again! you guys are great.

  9. #9
    rubber side down
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    avid bb7s got more power for a bit more cash than the bb5 or just look for a deal. those brakes and hayes mx4 are the best mechanical brakes for the price i would say better than many hydraulic brakes of a bigger budget. i put juicy fives on my monocog and so far ive gotten far more power out of hayes mx4s or bb7s.

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