1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Torqe setting on Race Face Sixc carbon handle bar

    guys, I just installed a new set of Race face carbon bars on my bike. I can't find on Race faces website anywhere where they have the reccomended torqe settings for brake levers. Im installing a ispec set of Saint m820's so would I use shimano's reccomendation of 53 to 69 inch pounds? I dont want to overtighten them but not sure what setting to use.

  2. #2
    clown question, bro
    Reputation: zeppy's Avatar
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    I can't find it either. Race Face has the handlebar install instructions online [handlebars are very complex to install, I guess...] but there's no mention of specific torque values.

    Just do what I always do... guess. If you start to get nervous, that's probably just about the right torque to apply.









    (That was a joke... sort of)
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    Are we just ignoring balls? Lol

  3. #3
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    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
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    Without the manufacturer's recommendation 4 N m is a pretty standard place to start. Just make sure you close the top and bottom of the plate (left and right too) all the same amount. Don't crank the top down all the way then tighten the bottom, do them the same amount and do it a little on top then a little on the bottom.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  4. #4
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    I've always used 5nm for carbon parts...which is a little over 40 in/lb if i remember corrctly. Never have had any problems. Heck, these days I just go by feel for small trail side adjustments.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the feedback guys. I have them set at about 40inch lbs and will see how it goes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Without the manufacturer's recommendation 4 N m is a pretty standard place to start. Just make sure you close the top and bottom of the plate (left and right too) all the same amount. Don't crank the top down all the way then tighten the bottom, do them the same amount and do it a little on top then a little on the bottom.
    I second that.

    In the case of brake levers though, why even torque them that much?

    I shoot for a snug fit where I can't accidentally rotate the lever up or down, but no more. The reason for this is that I'll eventually wreck and if the brake levers can rotate they are less likely to snap in half. It's much easier to get the multi-tool out and rotate them back than it is to ride home with a broken/missing brake lever.

    This is one of those personal preference situations though, so whatever floats your boat.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by robselina View Post
    I second that.

    In the case of brake levers though, why even torque them that much?

    I shoot for a snug fit where I can't accidentally rotate the lever up or down, but no more. The reason for this is that I'll eventually wreck and if the brake levers can rotate they are less likely to snap in half. It's much easier to get the multi-tool out and rotate them back than it is to ride home with a broken/missing brake lever.

    This is one of those personal preference situations though, so whatever floats your boat.
    This is solid advice.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for bringing this up guys. I used to do this on all my motocross bikes. I'm running ispec saint levers and shifters so I'm sure the replacement cost for levers is more than what I paid for my handle bars.

  9. #9
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    what is correct (maximum) torque for SIXC handlebar (785mm) on stem bolts?
    i have a new Atlas stem and there is a writing on it 8.4-9.6Nm (75-85in/lbs), quite a lot !

  10. #10
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    I thought we usually r to follow stem torque specs...we're talkn alu threads here.

    I haven't see any carbon handle bar torque specs yet...

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