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  1. #1
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    Too Big (Fat) but Determined!!!

    Hey guys,

    So long story as short as i can make it, 34 years old 5'10 and back in March i was 410 pounds!!! Due to health issues my doctor demanded i get off my lazy butt and do something about my health or he was just going to stop seeing me. Married with three kids i agreed!

    Decided back in March i wanted to ride, simple low impact exercise i can do.. atleast think i can .. So i bought a bike.. talked to the bike shop and we decided on a KHS Aguila.. In my budget, some quality parts.. however due to the weight i can not use the front fork.. Just sitting on the bike fully compresses the fork.. So I bought the bike knowing i would be riding it ridged with no suspension..

    So rode it around town a bit, got bored of that found out we have some local trails so the shop owner took me out several times now and having a blast... But I really really really need to get more cardio and riding around here in ontario has limited warm and dry riding times.. and i am not exactly stable on the bike so riding in the wet and slippery trails is not something i choose to do just yet..

    So 5 months later, i am down to 365 pounds.. getting better on the bike but still not the greatest and trying to find time to get more time on the bike and increase my cardio.. So i have been looking at buying a trainer for it.. With a spare rim and training tire.. So the days i want to ride i can just jump on it and go.. I have been doing the gym and tired of waiting for a stationary bike to come free and when they do it just does not feel or ride the same.

    My questions is, I can't find weight limits for the trainers.. I am looking at buying a cycleops Fluid 2 trainer, read some where that they have been tested to like 300 pounds.. So i think if i ride it with caution ( Sitting down ) then it should not be an issue.

    So questions.. And yes i have been told at the trail "Some people should just stay home and ride the couch" so if you feel that way by all means move along..

    1) Will i have issues with the trainer??

    2) Anyone care to share suggestions one what targets ( Heart rate? ) i should be aiming for to burn fat... while i have lost weight i have lost most of it on my legs, i have nice looking legs and calfs (So my wife says) but i have not lost in the upper body.

    3) Anyone know where i can find a 6 or a 7XL cycing shirt.. lol I found a 5XL at Love2Pedal which i wear 5XL T-Shirts and they are slightly baggy so i figured a 5XL cycling shirt would be snug but work out.. As wearing regular ****s they get heavy when wet, catch on trees easy and don't breath soo well.. however the 5XL cycling shirt was like trying to squeese into a 3XL tshirt for me

    Anyways, When i get my 10 post i will post up a video of my local ride.

  2. #2
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    Here is some video of my first real ride, Took a lot of bumps, fell a few times really winded most of the ride.. but was determined to complete the course.. they do wed night races and the average racer was doing the course in 12 minutes.. it took me almost 45 mins


    First real ride.

  3. #3
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    No advice on the trainer, but keep at it. Really any sort of exercise will help you tremendously. Just staying active, even just walking, will help. The weight will continue to shed off and your cardio will get way better.

    I used to be very heavy as a young teen and around the age of 14 I decided to do something about it. Rollerblading was my saving grace. Now I'm 5' 9" and 175lbs. Once you get there it's super easy to stay.

  4. #4
    Serenity now!
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    Great work on the massive weight loss! People who make comments like that to you at the trailhead ought to be sent to their rooms for a time-out. Shame on them.

    I find that cutting down on carbs like bread and soda has helped me lose weight around the middle. (I'm a work in progress, down 17# with 24 to go.). You might check out the Mark's Daily Apple website for more info.

    Check the Clydesdale forum here for clothing and trainer suggestions. Lots of cool, knowledgable big guys post there.

    Welcome, and keep up the good work. It just gets more and more fun to ride as you get better at it and gain more cardio. I am nowhere near where I want to be skill- or fitness-wise, but I have a blast every stinking time I get on my bike.

  5. #5
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    You know, Michael, that you are in rare territory with gadgets like trainers. It is good to read the specs, but you will just have to experiment a bit. I'm sure that is not new to you, though.

    The clothing is important. I don't own a bike jersey. I do buy polyester, dry-wicking t-shirts for all outdoor activities. Under Armor is good stuff. In the US, Sports Authority has a good selection, and the stores can probably order your size. In Canada, I don't know the stores. My wife sometimes finds sports tees for me from Wally World with dry-wicking tags.

    The bike jerseys are mostly made in Europe for skinny people. Their XL is barely a L in North American sizes.

  6. #6
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    Keep at it, man! Screw those guys who made those comments at the trail- they obviously weren't hugged enough by their moms.

    I know nothing about trainers but just wanted to stress it's as important on what you put into your body as it is the activity you do. I'm sure you already know that with the success you've already have getting in better shape.

    I second the Clydesdale forum- great group of guys who can encourage and educate quite well. Please keep us updated.
    ez
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  7. #7
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    Thanks guys,

    Over the years i have grown a thick skin and learned to tollerate most.. so i tend to just ignore the negitives and try and focus on the positives..

    I have found a great shop here in town who is doing alot ot help me, working with my diet as that has always been one hard thing eating to lose weight but also trying to eat enough to get in a ride is not always easy.. atleast for me. but working on it..

    This is the other set of trails by our home..
    KingCity Trails - YouTube

    Two weeks after i got the bike I was riding on the road, usually later in the evenings due to work so 8-9pm before it got dark but had a really good light, rear flasher and reflective shirt for riding yet i still got clipped by a car throwing me of my bike and the guy told the cops " I could not safely pass him with out taging him as he was such a wide object and with oncoming cars i accidently hit him".. and then was pissed he got a ticket and demerit points for wreckless driving causing harm.

    So after that i have moved to the trails... I do get lots of bumps, scraps and cuts from falling but so far safer than taking on real cars. lol

  8. #8
    No Stranger to danger....
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    All im gonna say is well done brother, keep it up mate, cheers
    Dont ever let the truth get in the way of a funny story....

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    Two weeks after i got the bike I was riding on the road, usually later in the evenings due to work so 8-9pm before it got dark but had a really good light, rear flasher and reflective shirt for riding yet i still got clipped by a car throwing me of my bike and the guy told the cops " I could not safely pass him with out taging him as he was such a wide object and with oncoming cars i accidently hit him".. and then was pissed he got a ticket and demerit points for wreckless driving causing harm.
    Wait, he saw you, knew he had to pass safely, and still hit you?

    And he's made he's getting a ticket? WTF is wrong with people today?
    Bikes, lots'o bikes

  10. #10
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    And yes i have been told at the trail "Some people should just stay home and ride the couch" so if you feel that way by all means move along..
    The answer to that is "Sure, I might be big but every time I ride I lose a bit of weight and will eventually end up slim. How many rides do you have to do before you stop being an arrogant prick?"

    Nice work on your current results, keep it up. I'm down from 300 to 250 at the moment, aiming for around 200 lbs.

    When it comes to heart rate zones I don't care much for all those theoretical rules of thumb. For me the important number is when I switch to running oxygen starved.

    Find a long, not too steep hill, pick a decent gear and start spinning at a cadence you feel comfortable with while keeping an eye on the heart rate. Your heart rate should be steadily increasing and at some point you will feel your legs start burning, that's a sign that your system can no longer pump enough oxygen to keep up with the energy spent. For me that happens around 160 beats per minute, but it's highly individual. Do a couple of climbs and you'll eventually get a feel for what your number is.

    The crazy thing is, when it comes to burning fat the intensity of your workout has very little to say. Tests on road bikes show that riding 15 mph or 20 mph gives almost exactly the same amount of calories spend per mile, in short it's must better to ride 20 miles at 15 mph than 15 miles at 20 mph, from a pure energy burning perspective.

    With that in mind your first aim should be to build up ride distance. I started out with a couple of miles, then added 100-150 yards every time out, eventually ending up with my current 15 mile training distance.

    In order to ride further and further I kept an eye on my heart rate and tried to keep below those 160 bpm I found out to be my threshold. If my heart rate started to reach 160 I would slow down and pick an easier gear. If you can't keep your heart rate in control you're going too fast. I kid you not, at one point I was outrun by a butterfly, it flew in front of me while I was slowly crawling up a hill in "granny gear", stayed with me for a while, then got bored and flew ahead. I made a real effort not to exceed those 160 on the climbs, going slow as hell when that was what it took.

    Once I reached my goal of a 15 mile loop I started ignoring my heart rate on some of the climbs, letting it go higher than 160. Generally I started pushing for speed, going faster on the last mile, going faster on the last 1.5 mile, going faster on the last 2 miles and so on, gradually shaving time of my personal record at the end of the ride where I knew I could always limp home if I pushed too hard.

    First time I managed to do my 15 mile loop it took almost 2 hours. These days I do it in 1 hour 15 minutes. I slowly build up the distance in small steps until I reached 15 miles, then slowly build up the speed on those 15 miles each time out.

    To recap, practice going slow enough to keep your heart rate below the threshold. If it gets too high, you're going too fast. It's okay to do short sprints up small hills from time to time, but keep your focus on building distance for starters. Once you have an acceptable distance, start adding speed, training your muscles to work oxygen starved from time to time.

  11. #11
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    If burning legs is a sign your heart can't keep up I should be dead. I'm really bad about grinding it out while my chest and legs are on fire. Lol.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    2) Anyone care to share suggestions one what targets ( Heart rate? ) i should be aiming for to burn fat... while i have lost weight i have lost most of it on my legs, i have nice looking legs and calfs (So my wife says) but i have not lost in the upper body.
    The higher the heart rate, the more the body burns carbs instead of fat.
    I would suggest longer, slower rides for fat burning, and an occasional sprint for strength and fitness.

    Back when I was losing weight, it seemed that diet made the biggest difference, and exercise not so much.

  13. #13
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    My rides are not crazy, I tend to do 5-6km and am pretty dead.... Its the cardio that i have the issues with, I climb some of the smaller technical hills faster and some hills that guys i ride with who ride 30-40km rides can't.. i do have big strong legs and thats great, but when i get to the top of the smaller hill im dead and totally winded!.. So the cardio is something i am working on. One of the main reasons for looking to grab a trainer so i can plop down infront of a movie watch my watch and maintain a nice steady easy heart rate..

    The first time i rode a real trail that first video there i actually had to turn my heart rate monitor off as it was going nuts hitting 220 and the computer did not like that.

    As for the car hitting me yes, He seen me... lots of traffic coming from the other direction and got tired of waiting behind me... and I was on a uphill so did not want to stop as it would that much harder to get going again.. He tried to squeeze by but what got me was i was tight on the curb already which had a guard rail.. and he hit me with his mirror in my lower back and actually pushed me a few feet before my front handle bar spun on me and i went over.. and the guy behind him said that he had plenty of space he could have moved over 3-4 feet to go around me and still have lots of room with on coming traffic..

  14. #14
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    Dude honestly, I'm 24 and just want to give you mad props on getting motivated and doing something about the weight.

    If I saw you on the trails I would give you a big high 5 for ripping.

    I suggest that you get a heart rate monitor, that will let you see what HR zone your heart is in, and you want to be in zone 3 upper - 4lower for most efficient fat burning which surprisingly isn't full out heart racing riding, its steady brisk riding where you can still talk sentence at a time.

    Not sure if you meant Ontario Canada, but if it is I would see if you live near any rail trails like the Caledon Trailway etc - where you can ride a flatter gravel trail for longer distances and keep your HR in a set zone easier.

  15. #15
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    yes its ontario canada... I am not far from Caledon.. I actually live just south of Barrie Ontario.. We do have plenty of easier surfaces to ride on even the local trails like coulsons hill i have riden the top part not going down into the ravine area and i can ride 3-4km of trail that is pretty much all flat with little elevations..

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    My rides are not crazy, I tend to do 5-6km and am pretty dead.... Its the cardio that i have the issues with, I climb some of the smaller technical hills faster and some hills that guys i ride with who ride 30-40km rides can't.. i do have big strong legs and thats great, but when i get to the top of the smaller hill im dead and totally winded!.. So the cardio is something i am working on. One of the main reasons for looking to grab a trainer so i can plop down infront of a movie watch my watch and maintain a nice steady easy heart rate..

    The first time i rode a real trail that first video there i actually had to turn my heart rate monitor off as it was going nuts hitting 220 and the computer did not like that.

    As for the car hitting me yes, He seen me... lots of traffic coming from the other direction and got tired of waiting behind me... and I was on a uphill so did not want to stop as it would that much harder to get going again.. He tried to squeeze by but what got me was i was tight on the curb already which had a guard rail.. and he hit me with his mirror in my lower back and actually pushed me a few feet before my front handle bar spun on me and i went over.. and the guy behind him said that he had plenty of space he could have moved over 3-4 feet to go around me and still have lots of room with on coming traffic..
    There are times when it is necessary to confront bullies. This is one of them. Let this man know that you know where he lives, and that he put your life and health at risk.

  17. #17
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    The good thing is the bike is holding up.. When i bought it the bike shop did show concerns with my weight and the rims.. Seems in MTB its not uncommon to fold a rim and when your 3 times the avereage weight trying to do stuff that the avereage do the folding of rims would happen more often..

    I gotta say, i have never damaged a rim.. I have fallen off the bridges a couple of times and bent the derailer a few times.

    The only thing i have damaged and damaged a couple of times is since getting the bike i have had to replaced the Seat three times.. My weight with the bouncing motion over the roots and rocks the seat rails take a beating and end up bend in a way that the seat is no longer comfortable.. but i really don't mind spending $20-30 every couple of months on a new seat.. and call it a simple investment

  18. #18
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    I must say, you my friend should be the poster child for cycling for health. I can't say enough how awesome and inspiring it is to see stories of people getting up and doing something to shed that kind of weight. I'm 6'2 at ~230 myself and can't keep to a better diet to save my life, so yeah.

    Anyway, I must second the idea of rail to trail riding. If you have a bike rack and are willing to travel I don't think you'll much better trails as far as near steady grades are concerned. Plus the scenery is usually just as good as riding single track. Keep at it and g'luck bro

  19. #19
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    Michael,

    I'm just echoing many here, but I salute you. If I lived near you, I'd ride with you. You are an inspiration. Keep it up and never give up! God bless you, man.

  20. #20
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    I thank you guys for the positive comments.

    I do feel bad when i do ride with the guys i do, these would be guys i guess like many here who race weekly, and tend to 25-30K rides as a leasurly workout. Yet they jump on there bikes with me.. Do my 5Km in 45 mins some times i seems like they are riding backwards while Im going full out.. lol

    But i guess they don't mind they keep coming out with me, and hopefully one day i can return the favor and haul around the track with them!

  21. #21
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    You sir, are a true inspiration. Keep up the great work and keep us posted. Positive attitude and hard work will help you reach your goals.

  22. #22
    gran jefe
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    Go easy on the trainer and it ought to be okay. don't lean back and forth too much, don't stand up, be careful getting on and off, etc.

    I am impressed and I wish you all the best.

  23. #23
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    Throw a little bit of weight training in on the days you don't ride. Low weight high reps for some muscle tone. Focuse on slow movement and weight control. Muscle burns fat! Like Beanbag said diet plays a huge role. I lost 15 lbs inless than a month just by changing the way I eat. Lots of fruits and veggies but don't forget protiens. A personal trainer told me once that if your not eating right or doing weight training with your cardio you will actually burn muscle instead of fat. Anywho, keep up the good work. Get the family involved too. It will make for great bonding time with your kids!

  24. #24
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sickmak90 View Post
    If burning legs is a sign your heart can't keep up I should be dead. I'm really bad about grinding it out while my chest and legs are on fire. Lol.
    Hehe, I know that feeling.

    Thing is, running oxygen starved really cuts down on how far you're able to ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    My rides are not crazy, I tend to do 5-6km and am pretty dead.... Its the cardio that i have the issues with, I climb some of the smaller technical hills faster and some hills that guys i ride with who ride 30-40km rides can't.. i do have big strong legs and thats great, but when i get to the top of the smaller hill im dead and totally winded!..
    Try going slower up those hills. Pick a nice, low gear and just spin up at a comfortable pace. Going slow and "easy" allows you to expand on those 5-6km and that's where your aim should be at the moment. Your cardio will improve as you add distance, so add a tiny bit of extra distance each time out and in a couple of months your cardio will allow you to ride three times the distance.

    Focus solely on building up distance for the time being, even if that means climbing hills at a snails pace. Small increments in distance each time out. If you ride too fast you'll bonk out and not be able to increase the distance.

    I just took a look at my ride log. When I started riding last summer I hadn't done any kind of exercising in 20 years, I was so out of shape it was hard to believe. On July 10th 2011 I was completely spent doing a 5.6km ride. By the end of August 2011, 30 rides later, I was doing 22 km rides without too much trouble. I was slow as hell, but my cardio had gone up from allowing me 5 km and 30 minutes to allowing me to do 22 km and close to two hours in the saddle. All from just going slow enough and adding a bit of distance each time out.

    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    So the cardio is something i am working on. One of the main reasons for looking to grab a trainer so i can plop down infront of a movie watch my watch and maintain a nice steady easy heart rate..
    Good idea.

  25. #25
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    Keep up the good work Michael! Loosing weight is defintely not an easy thing, I also know from experience. I was 305 lbs two years ago at the age of 20. Got made fun of my whole like through school, bunch of pricks! Decided it was time to do something too, I lost a 110 lbs in one year with dieting and running 3 miles a day. I just had surgery 3 weeks ago and rewarded myself with a tummy tuck to get rid of all the excess skin and fat. Also another thing that might help you that helped me was jump rope, running/walking, motocross, and biking. Hang in there man, your doing great, alot of people complain about losing 10 lbs, your defintely on your way and losing it the right way!

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by progfan1 View Post
    Michael,

    I'm just echoing many here, but I salute you. If I lived near you, I'd ride with you. You are an inspiration. Keep it up and never give up! God bless you, man.
    +1! And props to your LBS for getting out on the trail with you to get you started. Keep it up. Your ability, skills, and endurance will only continue to improve. Time for me to get out from in front of tis computer and get active!

  27. #27
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    Congratulations and I encourage you to stay with it. You'll drop the weight and also work up endurance over time as you get into shape.
    I don't use Strava. Don't need an application to tell me I am slow because I already know.

  28. #28
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    You should ride carbohydrate starved so that you have to use fats to produce energy. Avoid eating starchy foods the night before you ride. Reduce some of the glycogen stored in your muscles and liver. Consume some simple carbs right before the ride to get a small blood sugar spike to provide some energy, then as that depletes, fat metabolism will kick in.

  29. #29
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    Mr Lambert, You are an inspiration.
    Whomever it was that said that you belonged on a couch obviously didn't put too much thought into what they were saying. Congratulations for taking on something that most people just complain about.
    Your local bike shop sounds awesome, I can't imagine some kid at Walmart offering to take you on the local rides.
    Adam

  30. #30
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    Nice job!

    Lots of good advice. I'll second the weight/resistance training recommendation. Start with one set--to exhaustion--of various exercises, i.e. push ups, curls, squats, dead lifts. Even if you only do a 15-minute workout, it always gets easier if you stick with it.

    As for the trainer/heart rate monitor workout, I do that during the cold Chicago winters. It's super convenient and great for monitoring progress, calories burned, etc. I use the system employed by Mark Allen, 5-time Ironman World Champion, to build endurance: Target BPM = 180 - age
    HRM Training Article

    Training at 146 bpm (based on your age) is doable for extended periods and prevents you from overtraining. And at the right bpm, you'll be surprised at how quickly your endurance improves. Whether on the trainer or on a ride, you'll find yourself going faster/harder just to get your rate up to the target level.

    It's a little tricky to get a trainer to replicate hill climbing, though. You can shift to the big ring and do intervals of intense spinning but it's just not the same (maybe others have had more success). That's where squats and lunges come in--with good form.

    Keep at it! Getting started was the hard part. As your cardio and strength improve, you'll eventually be able to push harder and longer. It takes time but your patience and commitment will be rewarded.
    Joe
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  31. #31
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    Congratulations on the progress you've made so far.

    I wouldn't worry so much about heart rate zones. Whether you're at a very slow pace or at redline, you're still burning calories. There's some argument for high-intensity intervals for weight loss because your heart is going to take some time to slow down again, after clearing your muscles. The big reason for long, steady distance (not long, slow distance) as a base training method is that it lets you get more volume than if you hit redline a lot and can't do as long a ride, or have to take more days off. So don't ignore heart rate zones either if you find them a useful way to pace yourself. Just don't worry too much if now and then you end up in a higher zone climbing a hill or something. For heart rate zones, while there are certainly formulas around that you can use to guesstimate it, if you're going to use them, you're probably better off finding out what yours actually are. A lot of cycle training books have test protocols in them. Or you can go to a training center and have someone take you through a test protocol. TBH, I haven't bothered. I don't use a HRM.

    A trainer's a good idea. Cycle Ops is well-regarded and fluid trainers are about the best type going, especially when they're from a solid brand. They're built quite heavily. If anything, I'd be worried about the quick release skewer on the bike - that's how this type of trainer grasps the bike. It's about a $15 part if you bend one. So at worst, you'll find you just can't use the trainer yet. Get a fan! A big one.

    I don't know how long your 3 km take you. I do most of my training with time. I'd start with working up to rides of over half an hour before worrying about intensity. You might already be there, especially with hilly singletrack. Base training is generally seen as the type of training for weight loss - another name for long, slow distance - and this is all about working up in volume. Although if you're making progress, you might be fine to stick with your current volume. It's really all about how much time you want to spend on your bike every week.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  32. #32
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    I have to say man I'm proud of you! Losing weight is never easy! Ignore all the idiots who put you down. We all weren't born with a super fast metabolism! The main thing is eat a diet with about 50% protein and %50 carbs and fats. Get a calorie tracking app (my fitness pal for iPhone is awesome). You can place your goal weight in and current weight and it will tell you the amount of calories to eat. As others have said weight training on off days is a great way to build muscle burn fat and increase your metabolism. Do you have an indoor pool available to you? Swimming is a great total body workout to help you shed total body fat and boost your cardio abilities.

    The main thing is don't get discouraged. The weight will come off. I just started 2 months ago with limiting caloric intake to 1700 and doing light weight training and trail biking. I'm down from 325 to 286 so far.
    It's easy to make a buck, it's much harder to make a difference."

  33. #33
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    Great job! Let me give you a preview of the future. I'm 36, 5'10" and a little over year ago I weighed 394 pounds. I lost some weight and bought the same bike you have when I hit 310 pounds. (I recently had to throw out the stock KHS seat because I bent the rails at 270 pounds.) I'm down to 256 today, and still losing, and spent 4 hours on singletrack this weekend. When I bought the bike I hadn't ridden one in 15 years. Keep pedaling, and you'll be using that suspension fork soon, and clearing plenty of the stuff that you're walking now.

    Good work. It gets easier.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeinchi View Post
    Nice job!

    Lots of good advice. I'll second the weight/resistance training recommendation. Start with one set--to exhaustion--of various exercises, i.e. push ups, curls, squats, dead lifts. Even if you only do a 15-minute workout, it always gets easier if you stick with it.

    As for the trainer/heart rate monitor workout, I do that during the cold Chicago winters. It's super convenient and great for monitoring progress, calories burned, etc. I use the system employed by Mark Allen, 5-time Ironman World Champion, to build endurance: Target BPM = 180 - age
    HRM Training Article

    Training at 146 bpm (based on your age) is doable for extended periods and prevents you from overtraining. And at the right bpm, you'll be surprised at how quickly your endurance improves. Whether on the trainer or on a ride, you'll find yourself going faster/harder just to get your rate up to the target level.

    It's a little tricky to get a trainer to replicate hill climbing, though. You can shift to the big ring and do intervals of intense spinning but it's just not the same (maybe others have had more success). That's where squats and lunges come in--with good form.

    Keep at it! Getting started was the hard part. As your cardio and strength improve, you'll eventually be able to push harder and longer. It takes time but your patience and commitment will be rewarded.
    Joe any exercises you could recommend for someone who doesn't have gym or trainer access?

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    Quote Originally Posted by scribble79 View Post
    Joe any exercises you could recommend for someone who doesn't have gym or trainer access?
    Sure. A set of dumbbells (maybe the adjustable weight type) would be a worthwhile investment. They allow you to do a variety of "push and pull" exercises for the same muscle group which prevents muscular imbalance, e.g. huge biceps, small triceps But here's an idea of what a full-body workut might look like:

    - Pushups
    - Barbell Rows (either bending over 90 degrees at the waist with a dumbbell in each hand or with one side elevated on a bench--knee and hand--working one side at a time)

    - Bicep Curls
    - Tricep Extensions (lying on the floor, hold dumbbells straight up from should and then bend arms 90 degrees back towards the sides of your head and then back up)

    - Squat Jumps (keep your weight on your heels, push your butt back until quads are parallel to the floor, back straight with hands clasped behind your head and shoot up and get some air. 10 is hard)
    - Dumbbell Squats (same as above without the jump)
    - Lunges With Barbells (again, keep the weight on your heels, don't let your knees hover past your toes, step forward, bend until your thigh is parallel to the floor and then step back)

    - Deadlift (be careful that you don't try to do too much weight use proper form)

    - V Ups (on your back, both legs in the air as close to vertical as possible, shoulders on the floor and then reach up to touch your toes. 20 is hard)
    - Oblique Cruch (knees up and bent 90 degrees, ankles overlapping, hands behind your head--now try to touch your elbows to the opposite knee diagonally)
    - Leg Downs (like a leg lift but the emphasis is to bring your legs down forcefully and then prevent them from touching the floor. Hands with palms down under your lower back/hips for support)

    I would certainly recommend you check out YouTube or other training videos to ensure you're using good form. Also search "body weight training" if you don't have much room or equipment. There are lots of ways to work out at home without much equipment but make sure you always use good form to prevent injury and maximize results.

    Also, mtb'ing can be a pretty rigorous sport, so the extra upper body and core strength definitely helps to limit fatigue and injury.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

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    Can't give you any real help with your questions but just wanted to add my support! That's a lot of hard work and determination. People can be rude so I admire you for your ability to shrug it off and keep at it. You, your wife and your kids will all benefit from your decision to make the change.

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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead!

    Heads up. All CycleOps trainers will be on sale at REI starting this Friday, 8/24. If you're not familiar, their fluid trainers are considered among the best (along with Kurt Kinetic products). Of course, like all quality products, it commands a premium price and is rarely offered on sale.

    REI's everyday price for the CycleOps Fluid2 is $329.00 but will drop to $246.75 starting Friday ... roughly an $80 savings. Sale runs through Labor Day, 9/3.

    CycleOps Fluid 2 Bike Trainer at REI.com
    Last edited by joeinchi; 08-20-2012 at 08:17 PM.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

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    fasting has been practiced for centuries. juice fasting is fast, safe, and EASY when performed correctly. once you make it past day 3 you just coast, losing about 1 lb per day. your entire system clears out and it feels amazing.

    i did a 22 day juice fast a couple summers ago and lost 20 lbs. I would've gone longer but I never really needed to lose weight in the first place, i just wanted to detox. after the fast I felt rejuvenated inside and out, and my sense of smell increased tenfold.

    just something to look into.
    "Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads." -Back to the Future

  39. #39
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    Good job!

    Kudos to you Michael for doing the right thing for you and your family and don't let those naysayers get you down. F' them.
    Plenty of good advice here already, all you need to do is stick with what works for you. Good luck!!
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

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    THanks guys,

    Someone asked about how long my 3Km takes me.. depends on what trail.. locally on our trail coulsons hill we have lots of climbs and the 3-4KM ride will take me about 30 mins, on our other trail king trils they have a 1km pretty flat loop.. and i can now do 6-8km in about 45 mins

    not looking to go crazy, but trying to get on the right path.. i do have a number of issues that have also pushed me into this direction, I am a Insulin type2 diabetic, Suffer from Gout, hypertension and Isthmic spondylolisthesis which is why i picked up biking i can do it pretty low impact but really feel the rougher trails. lol but its fun.. just dealing with the numbness that happens some times is hard..

    As for the walmart comment, its funny my wife and i went to walmart first.. They had a nice looking full suspension bike selling for $699.. so the guy pulled it down and i told him i was worried about the build.. he said jumped on it.. so i got on it and hopped twice on the pedals and snapped the crack case splitted the bike in half... i was shocked and he claimed it was a manufacture defect.. so i laughed and said okay pull down the other one nad i will check.. lol needless to say he would not..

    So i found the "Real" Bike shop in town and again did not want to break the bank and the bike he recommended was the one i bought and kind of felt cheated being i paid $950 for it and it seemed to have no of the cool stuff like the walmart bike did.. lol but he assured me i was buying quality components which now i can see.. so my concer was the build so he took on that was in stock but too small for me and i got on it and jumped like crazy twisted and everything no give at all.. aside from the fact i knew i would have to lock out the front fork for now.

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    Hey mike it's me Holly!
    You are awesome!
    Keep on inspiring yourself to keep on going!

    I still want to seek out and destroy that couch riding jerk. Totally if someone had said that to me when I was new I would have maybe given up. You are strong!

    And p.s the King main trail (I think it's around 5k) used to take me over an hour for one loop.

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    Good job mate! I have been losing weight myself. I went from 265 to 230 in about 3 months. My favorite thing isn't dropping pants sizes or looking thinner but the increase in energy. It is crazy how much more stamina I have. Still have a ways to go before I hit my goal but so far the progress has been great
    My diet has been the biggest factor in my weight lose. I've actually been pretty bad with physical exercise lately but that should change soon once I get my new bike.

  43. #43
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    Congratulation on getting on track to a healthier life. You're lucky you found an exercise that you enjoy - I believe this is truly key to regular exercise.

    Also, good on the weight loss. Your local trails look great for someone in your situation - not too tough, but not too easy. Keep on the trails as much as you can.

    I'm not too fond of riding in traffic, so I try to keep on dirt or rail trails. Riding around town does happen occasionally, but I keep to the suburban residentail roads, not any main roads.

    As for group rides... I've been riding for over 5 years, but deal with a respiratory issue that will always be a problem. So I'm slow. Instead of riding alone all the time, I started posting up "Slow Guys" rides on the local mtb forum. There are lots of riders out there who can't keep up with the fast riders - no reason they should have to ride solo all the time. We've had some pretty nice rides, and I've met some good people.

    Keep up the good work.

    Steve Z
    Pedaling when it's dry
    And paddling when it's wet

    My insignificant blog:
    http://swampboy62.blogspot.com/

  44. #44
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    i dont know anything about the trainers, your original question. but keep up the good work, keep at it ! in time you will cut down that upper body fat. keep riding watch what you eat, and count your calories. get a plan started and shoot for the moon, dont get discouraged it takes time and motivation ! once a week i watch this video, it keeps me going !

    i weighed in at 320 pounds last yr, this yr this morning im at 269. but i ride, i work out 5-6 days aweek and when i ride i push 10 miles road and or trail. keep at great job !

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    Just wanted to say: Keep up the great work on it Michael, and don't let none of the asinine people out there get you down, including the idiots driving.

  46. #46
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    first keep up the good work. As for the trainers, if you are worried about the max weight try putting some 2x4s under the bottom bracket to help the trainer support the bike.

    If you want some nice trails to try come west to Burlington or Hamilton. There are several trails to try as well.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    THanks guys,

    Someone asked about how long my 3Km takes me.. depends on what trail.. locally on our trail coulsons hill we have lots of climbs and the 3-4KM ride will take me about 30 mins, on our other trail king trils they have a 1km pretty flat loop.. and i can now do 6-8km in about 45 mins
    For me, it's hard to do a good speed workout in less than an hour. It takes some time to warm up, and I often do them at least a few minutes' ride away from where I live.

    When you get to rides of an hour, start mixing up your workouts some more. Emphasize intensity in one or two of them. Keep pushing the volume on one or two of them. Variety is good.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    I'm glad you lost that much weight on in the first 5 months! I need to lose some myself!

  49. #49
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    Strong work sir! I work in healthcare and have seen so many that could have done what you are doing but never did and the outcomes were never pleasant. Keep up the good work and keep the rubber-side down.

  50. #50
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    Michael, great job on both trying to improve your health as well as starting to ride! Mountain biking is an amazing niche sport and it will enrich your life for years. I myself am an overweight rider. I weigh about 270 and really wish I could get down to 200. Three problem is I love my food, LOL. I've been riding for about 12 years now, and I still love the look on skinny riders when I pass them on the uphills and downhills...

    If i could offer you some advice, though, it would be this: my wife recently dropped about 120 lbs eating the paleo diet. Its a diet that advocates healthy unprocessed foods and heavily restricts carbs, you can google it and find out all about it. Basically, from what I understand, your body is made up of 80% nutrition and 20% exercise. Changing your nutrition has much more of an impact than the exercise you do, so a more casual approach to exercise might be easier as long as you can change your eating habits. I just recommend to enjoy your rides and try to find riding buddies to make it more fun. You'll naturally want to exercise when you have fun at it...

    Good luck to you! If you're ever in Socal and you need a riding buddy msg me, no problem.
    The fittest fat guy you'll meet...

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