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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    .I rode recently with a friend who is larger but much better fit than i am and we rode the same trails.. at the end of the ride both our computers said we rode 10.4KM however my total ride time was 1 hour 20 mins and his was 45 mins.. same computer. I know for a fact he was riding up what he suggested where simple climbs using his big gears.. while i did the same climbs in the granny gear and needing to stop and walk often

    Im very embarassed to have let myself get to where i am physically..
    Well I will say that embarassment can be a good motivation. I will let you decide if that works in your case.

    As for using granny gear.... No shame in using that. Alot of good riders use it and use it often. Smart riders know when using granny is the best. Also one thing to consider is that you have much bigger challenge than most of us here. What I mean is that for I would guess most us her putting on an addtional 100 to 200lbs on our bodies and then going for bike ride would kill most of us. Nothing to do with fitness level just the shear weight. Back years ago before I lost 50lbs I though I was in ok shape, but any physical activity was hard after 10 minutes. I started biking and lost 50lbs and obviously was more active. Then one day I did backpack trip with a 50lbs pack. Man they slowed me down big time compared to a light daypack. Then I realize that I had been carrying that pack around 24/7 for years. No wonder I had such a hard time and got tired so fast. Even being in better shape just carrying the weight is alot extra work.

    So don't get discouraged at all. Just keep at it. Every ride you can burn more calories and that does two things. 1) removes weight and 2) improves fitness. The more you ride the stronger you will get. It will take time and just stick with it.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", '06 Rocky Mtn Switch 26" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    Thanks guys, I guess often i just feel bad for the guys i do ride with.. I mean for them they just never know what they are going to get.. some days i can jump on and ride for 45 mins.. but then i have those days where 10 mins in im just totally spent and done..
    The guys you ride with do so because they like riding with you, so stop worrying about that. If they don't like riding with you, but still does, they are not too bright and deserves the pain..

    As for riding 45 minutes some days and 10 minutes on others, your strength and cardio doesn't really change like that. We all have bad days once in a while, but if you're training within your capabilities the good and bad days are mainly psychological not physical.

    I don't know your training schedule. Maybe you're one of those guys that ride 3 miles one day, 5 miles next time out, then 2 miles, then 11 miles, then 7 miles all depending on how much energy you have on a current day? I strongly encourage you to get into a steady rhythm, if you can ride 5 miles today, ride 5.2 miles next time, then 5.3 miles and so on, keeping your distances pretty steady while adding a little bit each ride. For the same reason it's good to have a favorite training track so you don't do 5 miles of easy, semi-flat terrain one day and 5.2 miles of stupidly hard climbing the next day. Try to get into a groove, sticking to terrain and distances you know you can handle, gradually adding extra distance or an extra climb from time to time.

    Once you have that rhythm, that groove, you KNOW you can do 7 miles and 60 minutes of riding pretty consistently. You'll still have off days once in a while, but your body doesn't just deteriorate from one day to the next, so the heavy legs are mostly mental. My usual trick on off days are postponing the decision to turn around and head back, "man, it's tough today, when I get to the foot of the next hill I decide whether to go on or turn back." then at the foot of the next hill I tell myself "This hill isn't too bad, I'll climb to the top and decide whether to turn back or not once I get there" and so on.. Sometimes I do that for the entire ride, constantly convincing myself to do another half mile before heading back.

    On other off days I just declare my ride for "sightseeing, not training". I make it a point to go slow and enjoy the scenery, skipping some of the harder climbs, taking detours and stuff like that, trying to ride my usual amount of time even if I don't ride my usual training route and at my usual intensity.

    The key to all this is slowly building up a distance you feel comfortable with, one that you KNOW you can do, and take it from there. Consistency, rhythm, day after day.

    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    My biggest problem is trying to eat right and portioned right.. I mean when the doctor tells me to eat veggies and chicken breast... i don't think he meant 3 chicken breasts and a whole head of broccoli for myself which is what it tends to take to fill me up
    You're not alone. I LOVE food and struggle to eat the right stuff and keep my portions reasonable. It helps me to think in training wasted, as in "If I eat that second portion I've effectively cancelled out the ride I did today", "If I eat that cake the ride I did today and the ride I did yesterday meant nothing". Not quite true because if I hadn't done the ride I would be up in calories, but it helps me to think that way, helps me stay off the cake as I hate having to pedal just to remain at status quo.

    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    Yea i wore it tonight, and went and did a couple of laps around the house.. we have a hydro field in the back yard with a paved path that goes up a decent hill.. i try and ride that every night at least once.. usually by the time i get to the top of the hill my heart rate monitor is going crazy saying its my rate is 180+ so i know I'm working it too hard. But as soon as i grab the bars and try to ride the jersey pulls right up on me and my lower rolls pop out.. lol
    If your pulse is too high you're going too fast. It's pure physics, the faster you move an object up a hill the more energy you spent, so if your pulse goes through the roof you're riding too fast. Try experimenting with how slow you need to go to make it up the hill without going over 160 in heart rate. Sounds silly to slow down and you might have to slow to almost a crawl, but once you master how to keep your heart rate below 160 you'll be able to ride for much longer time and much longer distance than if you let your heart rate skyrocket. Nothing wrong with "revving the engine" once in a while and go above 160 for short periods, but practice how to ride up hills while keeping your pulse below 160 in order to ride longer.

  3. #103
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    ... and if we just ...

    ^^ Good advice. You have to push yourself a little every day to gain stamina and strength. At the same time you also need to rest well and try to get 8 hours of Zzz time at night. This also helps your metabolism. Eating right may mean eating 4-6 times a day and eating smaller portions. Divide what you allow yourself to eat during the day and divide it in 4-6 portions. This allows your body to digest the food better and keep those hunger pangs away. Just look at bodybuilders who spread out their meals as well.
    YMMV
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  4. #104
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    Do you like spicy food? If so, eat a lot if it. The capsaicin helps to boost your metabolism. I'm not sure how much but every little bit counts, right?

    Edit: here is a link to some medical research regarding the subject.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  5. #105
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    Hey Michael,

    I've been a long time reader of this forum and I just read this whole thread and decided to finally post.
    First off, I want to congratualte you on your accomplishments so far. You've done very well and I hope you continue to work hard.
    Someone said earlier in the tread "just have fun", I agree with that. Everything else will come in time, just make sure you're having fun while youre doing it.

    Secondly, I am very impressed with the support on this forum. There are some awesome people here. Way to go guys and gals.

    PS. If you ever find your self in the Durham Forest area, don't hesitate to drop me a PM.

    Cheers.

  6. #106
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    Great job Michael , and ballsy to put it out there like you did! Don't get discouraged if you don't get huge results right away, but you're on the right path! I'm sorry your having trouble finding comfortable clothes to bike in, but at the rate you going, you'll be buying smaller clothes frequently. I did notice you said " 4 chicken breasts and a whole head of broccoli" maybe one chicken breast but fill up on broccoli, or whatever vegetable you like. If you like to feel full, you can still eat plenty of veggies, they are low calorie obviously healthy. Just avoid the ones with cheese, butter, etc. Once you get used to a healthy diet, the greasy stuff will seem gross to you. MTB is a great way to burn calories, its fun and distracting.
    2008 GT Force
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  7. #107
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    michael congrats on your progress man. Keep at it and you'll be shredding the trails in no time!

    As for your being winded, I used to smoke so my lungs are shot and I feel it early on during every single ride. I never really fully recover till the end of the ride. I've gotten a road bike now also to help with my cardio. Maybe you could go that route eventually? Not as much fun as mountain biking to be sure, but from what I've heard it does wonders for your riding. I can see now how that's the case. Beyond cardio they will help your leg muscles develop. Of course the big chainring on a road bike is huge! Even when it's spun up you still feel every pedal stroke. At least I do. Anyway, they are also good if your pressed for time. I can take a quick 30 minute spin and still get several miles in. It will have a nice home on my trainer come winter time.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  8. #108
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    thanks guys,

    Diet is another big issue, not sure if i disclosed it or not but i am a type 1.5 diabetic.. started as a type two for years and after years of ignoring it ect.. my pancreas finally started to just shut down So i have been insulin dependent now for the last 2 years and anyone who knows about insulin knows that all it does is quickly converts the glucose from my food into stored fats so its hard to eat for fuel for riding with out totally messing up my sugar levels.

    then i suffer from high uric acids ( Gout ) so i eat or drink something wrong and have a acute attack i can't walk for days! So what sucks is the Foods good for gout low in purines which cause the uric acids are BAD for diabetes.. and the stuff good for diabetes ( Greens ) are BAD for gout...

    4 years ago after having our daughter, my life got way out of control.. suffered some tried some dumb things and thankfully i failed! And i still get dealt some really crappy hands but i refuse to give up ..

  9. #109
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    Living is the hardest thing you will ever do. Taking any step, no matter how small towards improving your overall well-being is a massive achievement in itself.

    Anyone can throw in the towel and call it quits, but it takes sheer determination to push through all the BS and work hard towards what you want to achieve.

    Starting anything new is hard, especially if it is exercise related. You mind will try and fight you, but your body will thank you in the long run. Stick with it.

    Sit down and try and hash out a good balanced diet that works for your diabetes and gout. Diabetes first, gout second. I am sure there is plenty of information online about how to deal with these whilst also trying to keep fit. If you cant find what you are looking for, then maybe go and see a GP? I am sure they could help point you in the right direction so you dont end up doing more harm than good.

    In the meantime drink plenty of H20. Grab a bottle with a measurement on the side, and fight yourself to drink it.

    For example: Drink down to the second line before putting the bottle down. Drink down to the 4th before you do something else, and then so on and so forth.

    I never really used to like drinking water, because it didnt really taste nice at the time. Now I am drinking HEAPS because how it makes me feel refreshed. Something that softdrink/coffee/tea could never do, I just thought that it did.

    The first thing you should grab from the fridge in the morning is your water bottle. Drink the entire thing before you even consider drinking anything else. Take it everywhere with you, it will be your new best friend.

  10. #110
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    +1 on the good job here Michael

    There are tons of riders that have never suffered the same issues so they cannot really know where you're coming from. I too am overweight, have lost 40 pounds (40 more to go) thanks to my trek hybrid, 50 miles a week, and a diet that would make a vegetarian give up his veggies. It's not exercise alone dude, so don't lose focus of cutting out the crappy food.

    On the trainer, I would just keep on the bike. Someone once told me "when exercise becomes convenient, we tend to not do it." Examples would be all those home gyms and bowflexes that are collecting dust in the garage, or sadly those bikes that hang from the rafters all year long.

    Cheers and keep on riding. The more you think about riding, the more you will want to ride and will find time to do it.

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    thanks guys,

    Diet is another big issue, not sure if i disclosed it or not but i am a type 1.5 diabetic.. started as a type two for years and after years of ignoring it ect.. my pancreas finally started to just shut down So i have been insulin dependent now for the last 2 years and anyone who knows about insulin knows that all it does is quickly converts the glucose from my food into stored fats so its hard to eat for fuel for riding with out totally messing up my sugar levels.

    then i suffer from high uric acids ( Gout ) so i eat or drink something wrong and have a acute attack i can't walk for days! So what sucks is the Foods good for gout low in purines which cause the uric acids are BAD for diabetes.. and the stuff good for diabetes ( Greens ) are BAD for gout...

    4 years ago after having our daughter, my life got way out of control.. suffered some tried some dumb things and thankfully i failed! And i still get dealt some really crappy hands but i refuse to give up ..

    Michael,
    That really stinks. It horrbile how one thing makes it works for another. I am going to give one piece of advice. You can choose to follow it or not as fully understand that just because you see something on the internet that some guy posts it does not mean it is true. Anyway here it goes.

    Juice. - Vegtable juice you make in jucier machine. I drink one every morning instead of coffee. It is mix of Kale, Spinach, Brocolli, Cucumber, carrots and an apple.

    A little background on me. I am 38 years old and 5'7" 155lbs. My wife is 36 years old and was diagnose with Breast Cancer 2 years ago. She is cancer free now, but does not want it to comeback. So last year she started looking into way so reduc cancer risk. One thing she came up with was Juicing.

    Now I have NEVER been much of veggy guy. I used to compain if I did not get some slab of meat with dinner. Greens... Yuck. However she started talking about it and at the time I needed to lose 15-20lbs as I had gained weight during my wifes treatments. ( I get stressed and I eat). Anway I did two things.

    1) I watched Docmentary Movie. "Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead" (It is on netflix streaming) It was about a guy named Joe Cross from Austraila. He had gotten fat and was on a host of medications for some wierd immune disease. Anway he decied to eat nothing, but juice for 30 days. Sounds radical and it was. However the results were interesting to watch as well as what happend to truck driver (est 400lbs and suffering medical aliments) he met in the USA. Lets just say life changing for both these men. Now I don't do juice fast and I am not saying it right for eveyone, but I did decide to add more vegtables to my diet and reduce my meat and processed food intake.
    2) I started drinking juice everyday and found myself with more energy for my rides. I believe the nutirents I am getting through the veggies are making my body stronger and heathier. I lost the 20lbs I needed to lose and got in the best shape of my life. I still eat meat, but also take care consume more fruits and veggies as well as the juice every morning.

    So in your case... Well I don't know what will happen, but it probalby can help as most Americans at least don't enough veggies in their diets and can be low in the nutrients they provide.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", '06 Rocky Mtn Switch 26" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by thetazzbot View Post
    On the trainer, I would just keep on the bike. Someone once told me "when exercise becomes convenient, we tend to not do it."
    I disagree. For me exercise needs to be convient and ROUTINE. Have a bike trainer, but I found that when using my old MTB on it I cycle out the top gear and can't get enough resistance to give me any work out at all. I think it is due to shorter gears on the mtb vs a road bike.

    However I still need to convient way to exercise or I won't do it. So everyday afterwork and before I get home I try to hit the gym and do 45 min on the stationary bikes there. 45 minutues at near maximum output. For me that us 92-98 RPM cadence, 160-175 bpm heartrate and depending which bike I am on, (each one is a little different) 200-250 watts and 15.5 to 17 miles. Then after this I head home. I simply cannot walk in the door at home and then leave again on the bike. My 6 year old would have a fit. Plus in Arizona at 4pm it is 100 to 115 from May through September and too hot to ride. My actual trail riding occurs early 5am to 8:30am on the weekends. Point is everyone is different on how they need to get their exercise done and you will need to find a way during your winter months.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", '06 Rocky Mtn Switch 26" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I disagree. For me exercise needs to be convient and ROUTINE. Have a bike trainer, but I found that when using my old MTB on it I cycle out the top gear and can't get enough resistance to give me any work out at all. I think it is due to shorter gears on the mtb vs a road bike.

    However I still need to convient way to exercise or I won't do it. So everyday afterwork and before I get home I try to hit the gym and do 45 min on the stationary bikes there. 45 minutues at near maximum output. For me that us 92-98 RPM cadence, 160-175 bpm heartrate and depending which bike I am on, (each one is a little different) 200-250 watts and 15.5 to 17 miles. Then after this I head home. I simply cannot walk in the door at home and then leave again on the bike. My 6 year old would have a fit. Plus in Arizona at 4pm it is 100 to 115 from May through September and too hot to ride. My actual trail riding occurs early 5am to 8:30am on the weekends. Point is everyone is different on how they need to get their exercise done and you will need to find a way during your winter months.

    +1 exercise needs t be fun and convenient. If it is not, at least I find hard to find the energy to exercise.

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I disagree. For me exercise needs to be convient and ROUTINE. Have a bike trainer, but I found that when using my old MTB on it I cycle out the top gear and can't get enough resistance to give me any work out at all. I think it is due to shorter gears on the mtb vs a road bike.

    However I still need to convient way to exercise or I won't do it. So everyday afterwork and before I get home I try to hit the gym and do 45 min on the stationary bikes there. 45 minutues at near maximum output. For me that us 92-98 RPM cadence, 160-175 bpm heartrate and depending which bike I am on, (each one is a little different) 200-250 watts and 15.5 to 17 miles. Then after this I head home. I simply cannot walk in the door at home and then leave again on the bike. My 6 year old would have a fit. Plus in Arizona at 4pm it is 100 to 115 from May through September and too hot to ride. My actual trail riding occurs early 5am to 8:30am on the weekends. Point is everyone is different on how they need to get their exercise done and you will need to find a way during your winter months.
    for me it was a matter of finding something i really really like to do (biking) vs something I really really don't like to do: "exercise"

    but i can see the benefit of a trainer especially on bad weather days.

  15. #115
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Quote Originally Posted by thetazzbot View Post
    for me it was a matter of finding something i really really like to do (biking) vs something I really really don't like to do: "exercise"
    Same here, I started out with a decent in-door rowing machine and rowed it for a year, boring stuff but had to be done. Then last year I bought a mtb with the idea that I could pick that over the rower on sunny days, still just "has to do it!"-exercise.. To my pleasant surprise I totally fell in love with mtb'ing, no way in hell I was going back to the boring rower when I could have so much fun on a bike. Exercising is just a million times easier when you have fun doing it.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by thetazzbot View Post
    for me it was a matter of finding something i really really like to do (biking) vs something I really really don't like to do: "exercise"

    but i can see the benefit of a trainer especially on bad weather days.
    Winter too for some of us. I tried riding in the snow a few times last winter. Didn't care for it. The speed I was used to and the reason I love mtb so much, just wasn't there. This is where the trainer came in! Boring as hell so I didn't use it last winter. I learned my lesson this past spring. Starting from scratch really sucks. So this year I plan to use the trainer at least every other day. So when spring hits I can have fun from the beginning instead of dying for the first few rides.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by thetazzbot View Post
    for me it was a matter of finding something i really really like to do (biking) vs something I really really don't like to do: "exercise"

    but i can see the benefit of a trainer especially on bad weather days.
    Yes I had that same issue, but I consider my gym training as preparation for hitting the trails on weekends. So the more time and effort I put in at gym during the week the better I will ride on weekends when it really counts. Also that is why I ride only 45 min at the gym. I can't take much more or I will get really really bored. My weekend trail rides are at minimum 90 minutes and most turn into 2 to 3 hour rides. My last ride was 15.2 miles and 2 hours with maybe 2-3 minutes of "rest" time. I wanted to ride more, but I had things to do that day and so really needed to stop. Heck I would be happy to ride 4-5 hours if I could but riding in the desert summer means I have to start at 5 or 6 and finish before it gets too hot. That leaves me with only about a 3 to 3.5 hr window to ride. This fall when it cools down I will by trying some longer rides.
    Joe
    '12 Santa Cruz Highball 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", '06 Rocky Mtn Switch 26" XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  18. #118
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    Yup living up here when we are dealing with -20 degree weather, poorly plowed roads at best and a thin layer of slush and ice on everything much of the time.. my bike would never get used.. with out a trainer.

  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Z View Post
    Keep at it, man! Screw those guys who made those comments at the trail- they obviously weren't hugged enough by their moms.

    I know nothing about trainers but just wanted to stress it's as important on what you put into your body as it is the activity you do. I'm sure you already know that with the success you've already have getting in better shape.

    I second the Clydesdale forum- great group of guys who can encourage and educate quite well. Please keep us updated.
    ez
    Yes, wtf is wrong with some people....you are trying and succeeding in losing weight and getting back in shape...good for you! And as others have stated it's also very important what, when, and how much food you put in your stomach. The whole fitness and weight loss regimen takes time and if you say that you can't...then you won't. Just do and talk/ride with those who are positive inluences on your life.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Bib shorts stay in place much better.

    If you don't need the pockets in a cycling jersey, you can substitute running tops, general workout tops, etc.

    And, don't worry about holding up your friends. If they don't want to ride with you, they just won't tell you. Seriously, it drives me nuts when I ask one of my friends to go riding with me and he or she freaks out about holding me up, not being able to handle the trails, whatever. I want to (and sometimes do) say that when I want to set a PR or do a high-effort workout, I just don't tell anyone else I'm going.
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    IMO, road shorts are better liners than the liners that MTB shorts come with.

    If you don't want to show off your butt, put some shell shorts on over the bib shorts. Actually a good way to get double-duty out of the shells for MTB shorts you already have. It's not so gross to re-wear the shell if you're not re-wearing the liner.
    Exactly what I ahve found! My roadie buddie turned me on to bibs and that is all I buy now...even bought road bike for winter night riding.
    Last edited by Natedogz; 09-06-2012 at 04:34 PM.
    Get off the couch and ride!

  20. #120
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    When I was a teenager and pissed off as a general state of being, I found it pretty easy to go to the gym.

    When I was in college and had something I was training seriously for, I found it pretty easy to go to the gym.

    Now I'm not such an angry person and mountain biking and bike racing are things I do because I enjoy them - I have no desire or expectation for a paying career. It's become a lot harder for me to be regular about going to the gym.

    I need workouts to be a lot more closely aligned with something I do for fun in order to stay motivated and consistent. Although I can be pretty good about spin classes in the winter when I'm doing them with my teammates.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #121
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    Last year I weighed 414 and I am 6'2". I lost a little here and there, but decided to get serious this summer. I started an eating plan (Medifast to answer future questions, but any plan you stick to will work). I weigh every Wednesday, and this week I weighed 323. About to by a bike and add some additional activity to my weight loss.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by casey97 View Post
    Last year I weighed 414 and I am 6'2". I lost a little here and there, but decided to get serious this summer. I started an eating plan (Medifast to answer future questions, but any plan you stick to will work). I weigh every Wednesday, and this week I weighed 323. About to by a bike and add some additional activity to my weight loss.
    Nicely done, that's quite a loss.

    I'm not sure I could do a diet like that. The trouble with radically changing eating habits is that it's tough to maintain in the long run. I haven't really changed my diet except cutting down on portion size and cutting out some of the unhealthy stuff. Something heavily based on salads and veggies will probably help me lose weight faster, but I know I'll go out of my mind with boredom if I do that and I won't be able to commit to it in the long run. I like steaks, pasta and icecream, I just eat less of it and ride more. Riding a mtb is fun and I don't mind keep doing that for the rest of my life. Letting go of the steaks and switching to veggies will bore me to death and I know I can't stick with it long term.

  23. #123
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by casey97 View Post
    Last year I weighed 414 and I am 6'2". I lost a little here and there, but decided to get serious this summer. I started an eating plan (Medifast to answer future questions, but any plan you stick to will work). I weigh every Wednesday, and this week I weighed 323. About to by a bike and add some additional activity to my weight loss.
    Awesome weight-loss!! I am sure you knew it was life or death at some point.
    I have a family friend who refuses to do anything and I see him being carted out of his house with a forklift one of these days. He has pretty much given up and so has his wife, His food addiction is killing him.
    Keep up the good work!!
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

  24. #124
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    I'm a vegetarian, 5'8 150. I've been eating this way for about 5 years. It's just as easy to be overweight as a vegetarian ( carbs, carbs and more carbs) but if you go to a lean diet, cut out the processed foods in every way for a while, detox, you will see the weight disappear, fast. It's really that simple. I know that it's hard to get away from the comfort foods, but once you eat properly the bad stuff will seem gross to you. I spend as much time in the gym as I can, but it has morphed from working out for muscle to working out for MTB efficiency. I realized in my late 30s that I was gaining weight as my metabolic rate had somehow changed, and decided I was going to kick 40 a new one. I'm 42, in the best shape of my life. Michael, you're headed in the right direction IMO!! Mountain biking is the best exercise out there, I get really bored in the gym. Every weekend I ride my bike until I give out physically. I don't realize that until I'm totally gassed, because it's so much f*^%$^g fun. Rooting for you man.....
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  25. #125
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    Good luck, dudes. I took up this sport as a means to get fit while I lose weight, too. Current weight is 223 lbs. (highest weight was 260), and I have about 50 lbs. to go.

  26. #126
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    Very cool read mike.

    I have a buddy similar to yours. I also race mx one of my close buddies is knocking on 350 maybe more. He races to and is fast! People will make remarks about him on the starting gate before he starts. I just sit back and watch. Usually he kicks ass and has great style in the air. People just can't believe it.

    The way he unloads his bike is also crazy. The guy will literally pick the whole thing up and lift it over the side of his bed. It's a 450f so its around 220 wet.

    You keep it up! Great story! Just because your big doesn't mean you can't ride and ride well.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  27. #127
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    excellent advice....

    keep the heart rate low so that you feel like you can ride at least 2-3 hours at that pace, but sweating...

    also, i would say - 75% at least - is your diet.... 25% is exercise...

    watch what you eat, and in general - eat less. lots of info on the internet. drink more liquids (no alcohol).

    and most importantly - keep at it. only perseverance will yield results...


    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    The higher the heart rate, the more the body burns carbs instead of fat.
    I would suggest longer, slower rides for fat burning, and an occasional sprint for strength and fitness.

    Back when I was losing weight, it seemed that diet made the biggest difference, and exercise not so much.

  28. #128
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    Yea my biggest problem living around here is everything is hills.. lol And even the simplist hills are hard..

  29. #129
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    **** Health Update****

    so had my 3 month followup, I see my Doctor monthly for little followups, support and suggestions.. however every 3 months we do a blood work up and physical ( Great thing of great health care in Ontario Canada).

    However he had some grave concerns with my workup.. I am showing serious signs of "adiposis cardiaca" ( Fatty Heart ) so when he got those results he sent me for a ECG and we are showing "Pericardial effusion" ( Water around the heart). He did say that while it is serious its nothing to panic about yet but i am showing issues developing.. So i am on a new diuretic has told me i have to really put my head into a diet he wants me to drop red meats and shellfish and eat only lean meat ( Chicken breast, White fish.. ect ) and cut out white carbs, and going for another ECG and blood work in 30 days.

    He did show concerns wtih the fact that i do MTB... not so much that i MTB.. but that i tend to push harder than i should.. Not uncommon for my heart rate to exceed 220 on a tougher climb...

    He basicly said i can ride at a rate that does not cause a sweat... lol I told him i sweat just looking at my bike.. So not sure what i will do now, as i have being use MTB as my way of dealing with weight and stress over the last several months.

  30. #130
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    hey, where did you find serious hills in

    Ontario , Canada.... I've been looking for them for the last 15 years...

    kidding aside - do what your doc says... i don't think you need a better incentive to drop weight now...

    discipline and determination - that will take you a long way....

    discipline.... and... determination....


    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    **** Health Update****

    so had my 3 month followup, I see my Doctor monthly for little followups, support and suggestions.. however every 3 months we do a blood work up and physical ( Great thing of great health care in Ontario Canada).

    However he had some grave concerns with my workup.. I am showing serious signs of "adiposis cardiaca" ( Fatty Heart ) so when he got those results he sent me for a ECG and we are showing "Pericardial effusion" ( Water around the heart). He did say that while it is serious its nothing to panic about yet but i am showing issues developing.. So i am on a new diuretic has told me i have to really put my head into a diet he wants me to drop red meats and shellfish and eat only lean meat ( Chicken breast, White fish.. ect ) and cut out white carbs, and going for another ECG and blood work in 30 days.

    He did show concerns wtih the fact that i do MTB... not so much that i MTB.. but that i tend to push harder than i should.. Not uncommon for my heart rate to exceed 220 on a tougher climb...

    He basicly said i can ride at a rate that does not cause a sweat... lol I told him i sweat just looking at my bike.. So not sure what i will do now, as i have being use MTB as my way of dealing with weight and stress over the last several months.

  31. #131
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    At the risk of getting flamed by a bunch of ****-wads, have you considered a vegan/vegetarian diet? With an emphasis on organic plants and whole grains? Don't worry if you don't like tofu/tempeh, I think that **** sucks a bag o' ***** too. Too processed and too much soy. My goal in food purchasing is the least amount of ingredients, the better. Bonus if it's organic; at least, that's how I do when I have funds to do it. Dry goods at Whole Foods are stupid cheap. Quinoa is awesome. If you check out the Nutrition/Hydration forum there's a Vegan/Vegetarian Passion thread with lots of good info and a bunch of unnecessary flaming from ******-nozzles. But a lot of good recourses none the less.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  32. #132
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    Get a heart rate monitor and keep a close eye on it. Even if you are doing small rides with a stop to drop the HR, it is still exercise. You just need to learn to not rush into it, and instead ease your body into it. On the plus side, it means you will do exercise for longer due to the small stops every now and then.

    The HR monitor only has to be a cheap one that is easy to read. No need to over complicate it for what you need it for.

  33. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    At the risk of getting flamed by a bunch of ****-wads, have you considered a vegan/vegetarian diet? With an emphasis on organic plants and whole grains? Don't worry if you don't like tofu/tempeh, I think that **** sucks a bag o' ***** too. Too processed and too much soy. My goal in food purchasing is the least amount of ingredients, the better. Bonus if it's organic; at least, that's how I do when I have funds to do it. Dry goods at Whole Foods are stupid cheap. Quinoa is awesome. If you check out the Nutrition/Hydration forum there's a Vegan/Vegetarian Passion thread with lots of good info and a bunch of unnecessary flaming from ******-nozzles. But a lot of good recourses none the less.
    I have considered it, or atleast a variation of it.. I would like to keep grain fed chicken and white fish in my diet.. But i am planning on cutting simple carbs from the my diet completely.. And looking to stick with a veggie/ bean diet to the best i can.

    One issue i have is the Gout, and alot of what would be in a vegetarian diet would irritate it

  34. #134
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    don't know about organic

    Little evidence of health benefits from organic foods, Stanford study finds - Office of Communications & Public Affairs - Stanford University School of Medicine

    but veggies, dropping red meat, bread, eliminating sweet tooth etc - are all good practices... diet is more than 75% of success in dropping and/or maintaining a healthy body weight...

    i don't know if becoming a vegetarian or even a vegan is the answer... i believe, based on my personal experience as well, is that moderation is the key to living healthy...

    stay away from genetically altered food at any cost as well...



    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    At the risk of getting flamed by a bunch of ****-wads, have you considered a vegan/vegetarian diet? With an emphasis on organic plants and whole grains? Don't worry if you don't like tofu/tempeh, I think that **** sucks a bag o' ***** too. Too processed and too much soy. My goal in food purchasing is the least amount of ingredients, the better. Bonus if it's organic; at least, that's how I do when I have funds to do it. Dry goods at Whole Foods are stupid cheap. Quinoa is awesome. If you check out the Nutrition/Hydration forum there's a Vegan/Vegetarian Passion thread with lots of good info and a bunch of unnecessary flaming from ******-nozzles. But a lot of good recourses none the less.

  35. #135
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    I agree moderation, and correct foods are my issue.. and ofcourse finding something that will give me that FULL feeling..

    For example tonight, i made steamed cabbage with carrots and watercrest with chicken breast, and did potatoes for the kids and wife..

    However i could not leave the table feeling full with out eating almost 1/2 a head of cabbage and two chicken breasts.. which would have been two portions..

    My other major issue is seasoning.. I know i use too much salt and sodium high spices and really need to learn to back off that too.

  36. #136
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    I'm not advocating organic as healthier. The nutrient content doesn't suddenly increase because there's no toxins on the food, I'm not an idiot and understand this; it's just a better way to produce your produce. Less impactful and better for the water you drink, the animals and plants in your area and your ecosystem as a whole. Sheesh.

    Ah, I forgot about the gout. Find what works best for you and do it to the fullest. I'm pulling for ya and you definitely inspire me to ride more. Thanks for the stoke.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  37. #137
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    no need to be defensive..

    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    I'm not advocating organic as healthier. The nutrient content doesn't suddenly increase because there's no toxins on the food, I'm not an idiot and understand this; it's just a better way to produce your produce. Less impactful and better for the water you drink, the animals and plants in your area and your ecosystem as a whole. Sheesh.
    .
    my wife spends ton of money buying organic foods.

    but i am a technical person and just can't go for the hype... right now, most of the organic foods are pure marketing hype... but i like the idea. when it is properly regulated - it may work...

    let's not derail the thread... it is about OP and his problem, not about the organic foods....

    i am sorry if i said something that upset you - it was not my intention...

  38. #138
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    I agree moderation, and correct foods are my issue.. and ofcourse finding something that will give me that FULL feeling..

    For example tonight, i made steamed cabbage with carrots and watercrest with chicken breast, and did potatoes for the kids and wife..

    However i could not leave the table feeling full with out eating almost 1/2 a head of cabbage and two chicken breasts.. which would have been two portions..

    My other major issue is seasoning.. I know i use too much salt and sodium high spices and really need to learn to back off that too.
    A couple things you can do here.

    First, try eating more slowly. There's a bit of a delay between food getting to your stomach and when you feel full.

    Second, pre-plan your portion sizes, and don't cook more than that. You don't necessarily need to go straight to your planned dieting portion size. Actually, it's probably a bad idea. Figure out how many calories you consume in a day, and then reduce that number by just a little bit. Like 100 calories. If you don't start losing weight in a week or so, knock off another 100 calories. If you are losing weight, be happy, and don't monkey with your portions until you plateau. If counting calories as such is too anal for you, there are alternatives. A friend of mine does Weight Watchers and finds their points system easier, for example.

    I realize you're cooking for more than one person, which could make the portioning a bit harder. Supposedly, serving in the kitchen, so the food's not sitting in front of you on the table, is helpful. Since I almost always only cook for me, it's not something I've had to deal with, although it's probably a little easier for me to stop when I'm at a buffet than when I'm at a restaurant that serves family style and there's still food on the table.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  39. #139
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    Drink LOTS of water whilst you are eating your meals, and I mean LOTS. Also try eating slowly, and take in the taste of the food. Smelling food also helps you feel 'fuller' - I know, it sounds crazy.

    Given the outcome from your doctor, I really think you are getting close to the point of no return in regards to what your body can handle vs your medical conditions. It is a very tough pill to swallow.

    Without being too harsh about it, lets simplify everything down to the very basics.

    Being hungry sucks. It sucks a lot. BUT what is worse though, is not being there for your kids.

    I am not saying go and starve yourself, but I think you need to start putting the foot down somewhere.
    2 chicken breasts are nice, but 1 is just as nice as 2 when it comes to taste. Go for 1 bit of chicken, cut it up small, and only take nibbles of it after eating a portion of vegies and water. Enjoy the chicken when you get a bit, but then put the foot down, and move on back to the vegies.

    It will suck. You are going to feel hungry, but eventually you wont. Your mind is a powerful thing, and it will chuck a massive tanty when it doesnt get what it wants, but just like with kids, sometimes you just need to say NO and stick to your guns.

    All the best with your diet and exercise, and I really do hope that this is a battle you win for the sake of yourself, your kids, and your family.

  40. #140
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    Like everyone else is saying....eat slower. I found I can eat less and be satisfied even if I stop eating before I feel "full" It will catch up to you in a matter of minutes.
    '12 Trek Marlin Signature Green
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  41. #141
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    I'm 42 and I let my wife talk me into eating better. No, its not a diet I just watch how much I eat in one sitting and cut back to zero fat milk (yes, I LOVE a glass of milk in the morning) even though it is almost like drinking water. And I drink water almost exclusively...well except for 1 Dr Pepper in the morning. I have found myself constantly drinking water all the time and ice water at meals. I have also found that I seem to be hungry a lot more now that I am riding but I just drink more water and ignore my hunger.

    As for shirts I like under armor too but I REALLY like a Nike Dri-Fit Running shirt my wife got me. It says running inside the collar. I was able to get the mud stains out of the white shirt after a few washes too! I try not to wear it when its muddy now.

  42. #142
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    Michael- You are an inspiration! Big PROPS to you for getting out and taking charge. Just getting back into biking myself I understand frustration you feel when your friends are faster than you. Trust in yourself and know your doing this for YOU not them.

    You are doing great man, I wish I was near you; I would definitely ride with you, as slow as needed for us to enjoy the ride.

    Keep it up!

  43. #143
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    nice thoughts...



    Quote Originally Posted by B1llBatt View Post
    Michael- You are an inspiration! Big PROPS to you for getting out and taking charge. Just getting back into biking myself I understand frustration you feel when your friends are faster than you. Trust in yourself and know your doing this for YOU not them.

    You are doing great man, I wish I was near you; I would definitely ride with you, as slow as needed for us to enjoy the ride.

    Keep it up!

  44. #144
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    Here is my number 1 reason to keep from being 6 feet under.. Today was her her First day of Junior Kindergarten and she was deep in thought.


  45. #145
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    ... and if we just ...

    ^^^ Great reason indeed!!
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

  46. #146
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    Can't blame you for that reason! Keep up the work.

  47. #147
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    He did show concerns wtih the fact that i do MTB... not so much that i MTB.. but that i tend to push harder than i should.. Not uncommon for my heart rate to exceed 220 on a tougher climb...
    If your heart rate goes through the roof you're riding too fast. Seriously, practice climbing up a hill at stupidly low speed while trying to keep your heart rate below a predetermined number. Make a "game" where the objective of your trip is to never exceed for instance a heart rate of 170, if you get close, slow down even further, no matter how slow it gets. If it turns out impossible to get up a hill without breaking 170 then get off and walk. If walking has your heart rate climbing past 170, then walk slower. You will eventually learn how to keep your heart rate from exploding. It doesn't mean you have to ride like that every time out, but it's a really helpful tool to have in the bag once you've learned how.

    As your fitness improves it gets easier. Your resting heart rate will eventually become lower and your heart rate will drop faster when you ease off the pedaling.

    When I started riding last year I inputted my age and weight into my bike computer and based on rule of thumb it decided that my "zone" stretches from 116 to 152. Rule of thumb numbers like that are a bit arbitrary but I thought what the hell and just went with them. After each ride I could see how many minutes I had been in the zone, how many minutes below the zone and how many above. I would usually have like 30 seconds of "below" which amounted to me getting on the bike and strapping on my helmet. As soon as I started pedaling even slightly I would instantly go above 116.
    A year later I get quite a bit of "below" time simply because coasting down a hill will drop my pulse rapidly and sometimes into double digits. The upside is that I can start my climbs from a lower heart rate simply by relaxing/coasting a bit before I hit the climb and then I can push harder up the hill before reaching my max. heart rate.

    On a side note. The 7 year old daughter of my friend once asked about my bike computer and pulse belt. I told her it was a speedometer for my heart. She asked if she could try it and I shortened the pulse belt with a safety pin and strapped it around her chest. She had my bike computer in her hand and I told her if she walked a bit the heart rate would rise and if she sat down and relaxed it would fall. We tried asking how low she could go if she stayed completely still on the couch, but that soon got boring so she did jumping jacks instead to "go for the record". Her heart is built like a race engine, she would blow my numbers completely out of the water and half a minute after stopping the jumping jacks she was back close to her resting pulse. I guess there is something to be said about being a bit of a tomcat, climbing trees and running with her friends all day long..

    Quote Originally Posted by michael lambert View Post
    He basicly said i can ride at a rate that does not cause a sweat... lol I told him i sweat just looking at my bike.. So not sure what i will do now, as i have being use MTB as my way of dealing with weight and stress over the last several months.
    Hehe, same here, I sweat real easy, just getting down on all four to pick up a coin under the couch will have me perspiring. I don't pant and gasp no more after getting in much better shape on my bike, but for some reason even the smallest bit of effort still has me sweating. I can stand in line at the grocery shop with a basket of goods and built up a sweat.

    Ask your doctor for clarification based on heart rates rather then sweating/non-sweating. I can sweat at completely undramatic heart rates, which would essentially cut me off from any kind of exercising including standing in line at the grocery shop, which just can't be right.

  48. #148
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    well i did get the 6XL jersey it does fit better so i have something to wear now and something when i lose more weight

    the 5xl and a couple of weeks ago



    and the 6XL



    cant weight till i can get into cloths off the rack!!!

  49. #149
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    ... and if we just ...

    Just keep at it and it will happen!
    Current ride(s) 2011 Santa Cruz Blur LT

  50. #150
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    way to go, congrats on ur progress and motivation to improve ur health.

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