1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #26
    CSC
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    Quote Originally Posted by 410sprint View Post
    Here is a tip from the world of dirt track racing.. before hitting a muddy trail, spray a light coat of baby oil on the areas of your frame and forks that will get clogged up with mud. For the most part the mud will fall right off and not build up on the bike.


    Disclaimer: Don’t put baby oil on your brakes, seat or grips… Mmkay
    Does this would on matte frames too? (painted, no smooth clear-coat)

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    Does this would on matte frames too? (painted, no smooth clear-coat)
    Yes

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    Does this would on matte frames too? (painted, no smooth clear-coat)
    At the expense of beating a dead horse, if you have to spray Pam on your frame to keep mud from packing up, it's too muddy to ride and you're tearing up the trails. The volunteers who maintain them (many of them are mountain bikers) would appreciate that you stay off them until the trails are ready to ride.

    Most local trail volunteer groups have a trails update system. My local group has a website, a forum and twitter to provide trail status updates. Most trails have something similar.




    Sent from my rotary phone and compiled with a telegraph machine.
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  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    Does this would on matte frames too? (painted, no smooth clear-coat)
    A good coat of automotive wax also helps ease cleaning and prevents build-up of mud...

    There are lots of trails out there that are fun o ride in the mud.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    At the expense of beating a dead horse, if you have to spray Pam on your frame to keep mud from packing up, it's too muddy to ride and you're tearing up the trailsSorrythis is a generalization that is not true. The volunteers who maintain them (many of them are mountain bikers) would appreciate that you stay off them until the trails are ready to ride.

    Most local trail volunteer groups have a trails update system. My local group has a website, a forum and twitter to provide trail status updates. Most trails have something similar.




    Sent from my rotary phone and compiled with a telegraph machine.
    While some trails are maintained by volunteers, their are lots that are not....

    Secondly there are lots of trails that stand up to use just fine in muddy condtions...

    Thirdly there are trails that are always muddy and never dry out...and are ridable

    Fourthly there are trails that are exposed to cattle, and horses all spring and summer long etc and a bike will not cause any additional damage.

    Sounds like your group as a nice set-up but don't generalize about not riding in muddy condtions....

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    While some trails are maintained by volunteers, their are lots that are not....

    Secondly there are lots of trails that stand up to use just fine in muddy condtions...

    Thirdly there are trails that are always muddy and never dry out...and are ridable

    Fourthly there are trails that are exposed to cattle, and horses all spring and summer long etc and a bike will not cause any additional damage.

    Sounds like your group as a nice set-up but don't generalize about not riding in muddy condtions....
    you're the one jumping to conclusions. I don't care who you think you are, if your bike is packing up with mud like in the pics earlier in this thread, you should not be on the trail and you are an a$$ if you continue to ride it because you think it's fun.

    how a trail handles moisture depends enormously on the soil conditions. If the trail is on deep clay or silt, you're screwed. go somewhere else. sandy or rocky trails can handle much more moisture before it's best to keep off.

    Freeze/thaw clay mud is the worst. No spray is going to stop the wheels from packing up like in the pics.

    Now everybody no matter how sensitive they are to moisture on the trails, is going to wind up with some kind of mud on their bike, and yeah, a nonstick spray can make it easier to wipe that stuff off.

    and really, it doesn't matter who maintains the trails or not, or who else uses them and what they do. it's irresponsible to trash them.

  7. #32
    CSC
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Now everybody no matter how sensitive they are to moisture on the trails, is going to wind up with some kind of mud on their bike, and yeah, a nonstick spray can make it easier to wipe that stuff off.
    and really, it doesn't matter who maintains the trails or not, or who else uses them and what they do. it's irresponsible to trash them.
    I'm in the category of wanting to make cleaning up easier. Matte finishes on frames allows any sort of mud to adhere to the frame much more than on a clear-coated frame.

    I'm thinking spring riding, when 90% of trails or dry, but with mucky patches...you know, a puddle here and there, but mostly dry and set-up.
    As one who dealt with the Ice Muck from Hell, trust me...you don't want to deal with it.
    One does not simply "wipe off" Ice Muck from Hell.
    But having a non-stick coating would really help with general fall/spring riding, when it's dry, but you still deal with some splatter.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott View Post
    While some trails are maintained by volunteers, their are lots that are not....

    Secondly there are lots of trails that stand up to use just fine in muddy condtions...

    Thirdly there are trails that are always muddy and never dry out...and are ridable

    Fourthly there are trails that are exposed to cattle, and horses all spring and summer long etc and a bike will not cause any additional damage.

    Sounds like your group as a nice set-up but don't generalize about not riding in muddy condtions....
    I'm not generalizing. If your bike is packing mud between the tire and the stays (like the pictures in this post) and you have to stop and clean the mud off every couple hundred feet in order to keep tires spinning, then you shouldn't be riding on the trail. You are tearing it up.

    Since you seemed to have missed this, I'll spell it out clearly: I'm not saying you shouldn't ride wet trails or trails that stand up to abuse based on geography. That is specifically not my point.


    Sent from my rotary phone and compiled with a telegraph machine.
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  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSC View Post
    I'm in the category of wanting to make cleaning up easier. Matte finishes on frames allows any sort of mud to adhere to the frame much more than on a clear-coated frame.

    I'm thinking spring riding, when 90% of trails or dry, but with mucky patches...you know, a puddle here and there, but mostly dry and set-up.
    As one who dealt with the Ice Muck from Hell, trust me...you don't want to deal with it.
    One does not simply "wipe off" Ice Muck from Hell.
    But having a non-stick coating would really help with general fall/spring riding, when it's dry, but you still deal with some splatter.
    I wish the midwest was like that in the spring. In the midwest, late winter to early spring is generally the best time to take up road riding or some other activity. For one, the ice mud is really common until the worms come out.

    Then, moisture sticks around a long time in some soil types after that until the trees begin leafing out and drawing that moisture up through their roots. The sandy MI soils tend to dry up quicker than a lot of the other soil types unless there's a fair amount of rock in the soil to hold up to traffic, which can be uncommon.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    ..as I'm moving north in about a month, I'm going to have to familiarize myself with a new pattern of daily temp swings and soil conditions....
    Do I remember correctly that you're headed to IN? If so, On a clear day after nights in the mid twenties, the southern slopes are greasy by 11am. Get your rides in early or go late with lights.

    Sounds like you already know the routine.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr View Post
    Do I remember correctly that you're headed to IN? If so, On a clear day after nights in the mid twenties, the southern slopes are greasy by 11am. Get your rides in early or go late with lights.

    Sounds like you already know the routine.
    Yup. I started riding in Ohio at the same latitude more or less to where I'm headed. I am familiar with how the basics go but will need to refamiliarize muself with the details

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