1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Tire suggestions

    Hello everyone, I recently acquired a Trek remedy 5 bike but I'm finding the tires that came with it are slow on pavement. Right now I am doing a mixture of pavement and trails (more pavement then trails though) the bike came with botrager acx tires 26 x 2.20. Any suggestions on a different tire, and also would they have to be the same width as the old ones? Here's a picture of the bike. Thanks!

    Tire suggestions-imag0024.jpg

  2. #2
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    New tires do not have to be the same width as what you have now. If you are doing allot of pavement riding, you may want to look at something like a Kenda Slant 6 or a Geax AKA. The other thing to ask is whether or not you want to go tubeless?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dharel1705 View Post
    New tires do not have to be the same width as what you have now. If you are doing allot of pavement riding, you may want to look at something like a Kenda Slant 6 or a Geax AKA. The other thing to ask is whether or not you want to go tubeless?
    I'm not sure what the difference is between tubeless or not, although it seems to be the preference among the riders here. I was looking at these tires.

    Kenda Kozmik Lite II Mountain Bike Tire, L3R Pro, Folding, 26x2.0: Amazon.ca: Sports & Outdoors

  4. #4
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    If you're going to be riding mostly on the street and light trails, then there isn't a need to go tubeless which gives you the ability to run your tire at a lower air pressure. For some riders, its just a hassle to deal with all the sealant and other issues that comes along with it. Also, not all wheels are tubeless compatible. Even though they make conversion kits, its still doesn't guarantee that a specific wheel will hold air, especially through a ride. I, myself, still prefer a tube.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shakester View Post
    If you're going to be riding mostly on the street and light trails, then there isn't a need to go tubeless which gives you the ability to run your tire at a lower air pressure. For some riders, its just a hassle to deal with all the sealant and other issues that comes along with it. Also, not all wheels are tubeless compatible. Even though they make conversion kits, its still doesn't guarantee that a specific wheel will hold air, especially through a ride. I, myself, still prefer a tube.
    Hmm I don't think I need to go tubeless right now after reading this, I probably won't be hitting anything too heavy for a while, thanks.

  6. #6
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    For the application you describe, tubeless is not worth the hassle.

    By trails do you mean gravel paths/fire roads or more serious singletrack riding?

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4 Beta

  7. #7
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    And also, the geax aka's recommended above are a great tire, but they wear out VERY fast on pavement

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4 Beta

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8iking VIIking View Post
    For the application you describe, tubeless is not worth the hassle.

    By trails do you mean gravel paths/fire roads or more serious singletrack riding?

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4 Beta

    It would be just light trails right now, nothing crazy.

  9. #9
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    I would try some specialized renegades or kenda small block 8's. I can't speak on how fast they wear but it looks like they would be choice for what you describe

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 4 Beta

  10. #10
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    You can always get 2 sets of tires and switch them before each type of ride for the maximum performance or live with the compromise with tires like other suggested SmallBlock 8, but even that it would still feel slow(ish)

  11. #11
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    Schwalbe Smart Sam - doesn't consume fast on pavement and good traction in terrain

  12. #12
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    Spec' Hardrock'r rear works very well on pavement and on trails. Use a Spec' Fast Trak for front tire. I have used this combo for many miles. I recently put some street tires on that bike but I hate them so I think i'm going to put the original combo back on.

    The Hardrock'r is great for the rear because it rolls well, takes a long time to wear, still works great as it wears down.

    I have a set of Racekings on my 29er front and back for trail and pavement use and that combo works really well too. The bike originally had Rocket Rons but the one in the rear was wearing fast...they were heavy wire bead versions anyways.

  13. #13
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    WTB Nano gets my vote. Just get the wire beat type as the race material will wear faster. It's super fast on pavement and very off road capable.

  14. #14
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    continental race kings 2.2 should do the trick. fast but ride trails well with good grip.

  15. #15
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    the maxxis larsen tt for the front is great and last seriusly a long time
    for the rear if you can get a maxxis ranchero would be great or a maxxis crossmark

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