1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Tire Suggestions

    I am new to this. I actually just got my mtb the other day, but now I need help finding the right tires. Currently the tires are mounted with Vulpine semi-slicks. I would like to know what is a good tire for trail riding and climbing. Rockish type riding I guess.

    Are these tires sufficient? What is a better option that won't break the bank?

    If you guys are from NJ... tires for the trail Lewis Morris or Patriots Trail.

    Really Clueless here.

  2. #2
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    Sorry you might need more info. I am riding a Specialized 29er Comp 2009

  3. #3
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    I bought a set of WTB Exiwolf tires to replace my Kenda Small Block Eights and though I've only ridden on them once, they fair rather well on dirt pack and downhill singletrack (lots of rocks). Haven't tried them in mud or rain, but so far I am pleased with the results.

    And they're dirt cheap right here:

    WTB Exiwolf Tubeless Tire - 26in | Hucknroll.com

  4. #4
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    hmm.. thanks for the reply 2 slow... but I don't think these will fit on my 29er :-/

  5. #5
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    oops didn't see your second post, or I posted before you did.

    FWIW, there is a tire and wheel section here on the forums where plenty of pertinent information is going around.

    Also, at the top of the homepage, there is a review section for tires which is actually quite comprehensive.

  6. #6
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    yea i saw the tire and wheel section... I'll keep going over it, but Im really lost cause I see people picking different front and back tires ..... thanks though

  7. #7
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    Go to your LBS and ask the folks what most people are using on the trails near you. Tread selection is very dependent on the type of trails local to you. What works on rocky terrain with loamy mud won't work on rocky trails with sand.

  8. #8
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    I am riding Allamuchy North/Deer Park, haven't been to Lewis Morris yet, although co-workers ride there so maybe Ill get out there.

    I replaced my 29ers Small Block eights for Continental Trail King 2.2 Up front, and a Maxxis Ignitor 2.1 in the rear. I couldn't fit the 2nd Trail King in the rear, not enough clearance with the FD. Both tires have been great so far and I have no complaints.

  9. #9
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    Tioga psycho genius 29er. As grippy if not gripper than the rampage but faster rolling tires. High volume and easy to convert to tubeless. A few of my friends got them after they tried mine, they love the tires.


    Sent from my iPhone 4s using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    Are the trails loose dirt wet or muddy or sandy ever?
    You said rocks, how large are they 100 lb watermelon sized rocks or 5lb cantaloup sized rocks

    I really like the Specialized Ground Control for their trail performance but if you ride a lot of pavement then they can drag a little bit, like any big knobby tire will.

    The Velociraptor seems to strike a balance between trail and pavement riding but I have no idea if you need more or less big knobs on your trails.

    I have not seen an advantage to having different vs matched front and rear tires.
    I eventually decided to keep the same tire on front and rear.

    Going tubeless is a huge plus and will make any tires you choose so much better to ride!

  11. #11
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    Slow down, Byako! What's the rush?

    You just got the bike, you're not sure if the tires are good but haven't tried them? Do you even know where you'll be spending most of your time on the bike? Just trails or maybe around town or commuting or ... Will you ride in muddy, wet conditons? Do you want lightweight rubber? Do you have tubelss ready wheels?

    If you're working on a limited budget then don't buy a thing until you can answer all those questions. You might be a newbie but anyone is capable of determining whether the tires work for their puposes. Take it on the trail and see how it goes.

    Maybe those WTB Vulpines (which are not bad tires) are all you need.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  12. #12
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    Wear out your current tires..who knows, you may like them. In general, the heavier the tire the more durable . most of the tire manufacturers have helpful online guides to help with tire selection.I suggest Geax tires,well built and can be found on sale.

  13. #13
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    Gotta say go for the right tires right now. You ride on tires with poor traction and the limits get imprinted and take awhile to erase when you ride the same lines with good stuff. Tires are 35 ea so why wear out junk. Schwalbe Rocket Ron 2.1 or RaRa 2.25 rear 25lbs. Nobby Nic 2.25 front 23-25lb -- Performance grade should work and last.

    At 600g ea they will also drop weight and speed up your steering and climbing. Weight off the rolling components and at the rim area is THE best.
    Last edited by eb1888; 08-08-2012 at 02:41 PM.

  14. #14
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    One othe thing. I think the semi-slick description of the WTB Vulpines may be a bit miseleading. Typically, the semi-slick label is used to describe dual-purpose tires found on hybrid bikes which spend most of their time on roads with occasional path rides. They're usually no more than 1-1/2" wide and look like road bike tires with grooves or tiny knobs.

    The Vulpines are actually an off-road tire with a low-profile center tread designed for speed and low rolling resistance. They also have knobby shoulders, unlike a typical semi-slick. Such a design is common amongst cross country (XC) race tires. And, at 650g, they're by no means a heavy tire.
    Joe
    Chicago, IL

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Byako View Post
    yea i saw the tire and wheel section... I'll keep going over it, but Im really lost cause I see people picking different front and back tires ..... thanks though
    Its pretty common to run a different tire front and rear. They are doing much different jobs and have different clearance concerns depending on your fork and frame. For the rear you typically want a tire that is faster rolling and has a better center tread for keeping traction while hammering up steep ascents. Many people prefer a smaller tire in the rear as well due to clearance and the argument (which I am not trying to rekindle) that it will have less rolling resistance. I also give more concern to how the center knobs are going to handle braking. In the front you typically give up a little rolling resistance to gain some traction because your front tire washing out is much more devastating than your rear washing out. I give more concern to the side knobs and how they will grip on wet roots/rocks. I like as large a tire as I can run in the front (limited by rim width and fork clearance) as I feel it gives a better ride and is more compliant to the terrain.

    I am assuming your bike is a Hardrock or Rokhopper which have rims with a 17mm internal width. You can run up to a 2.3" wide tire though Most 2.3" tires will get squirmy in corners and some can come off the rim with enough lateral force. The rims I ride have a 17mm internal width as well and I was recommended Rampage 2.3 tires as a good loose, wet terrain tire that is larger volume and wouldn't have an issue with the 17mm rims.

    I have a buddy with Vulpines that he uses for commuting and I wouldn't recommend them at all for trail use. XC maybe for an experienced rider but not a beginner. You want a tire that is going to be more forgiving to beginner mistakes.

    If you got the Specialized tires that came on the bike (Fast Track LKs?) they would be a better tire to start with if its dry. I haven't had too much issue with them unless its wet.

    +1 for asking at your LBS or going to the trailhead and seeing what people are actually riding.

    Have fun riding!

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