1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    178

    Time for me to get another bike?

    I was riding my local trail with my friends and I went off a jump that was only maybe 15" and I landed it fine, but my fork didn't absorb anything, and my brakes just completely screwed up and clamped my wheel and I feel over my handlebars and faceplanted the ground. I have a trek 3900 that I think is not an appropriate bike for my type of riding. I hate the way my bike has been performing because mainly the tires don't grip the ground at all, the fork does nothing (as good as a rigid) and the brakes do nothing if I get the rims a bit wet. Now I've been telling my parents that this bike just isn't performing well, except my parents keep telling me to wait until september. That means I'll have to spend the whole summer riding this piece of junk. My parents just don't understand...

    The reason I can't get my bike until September is because my dad really wants me to do piano, and he says if I pass my exam in August(I get the results in September) then I can get a new bike. I'm just afraid I'm going to hurt myself with this bike.

    Also, I rode my friends bikes (Specialized Hardrock and Norco 125 with Pikes) and I NEVER knew forks were supposed to feel that plush, and that disc brakes were so much more powerful than v-brakes.

    Any suggestions for all this?

    THanks

  2. #2
    MTB Newb
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    60
    I think a little work could do wonders for the way your bike rides. I am not sure what to do myself, but I am sure there is someone on these forums who can help you out.

  3. #3
    Going for a ride......
    Reputation: energetix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,146
    Yes it's hard not to loose appreciation of your current bike when you have a new one on the horizon!

    Obviously your parent's believe that your new bike should be a reward for you doing well on the piano. Be a real bugger if you don't pass the test though! Anyway, get an idea of how much they will let you spend on a new bike - and If you're sure that you will do really well then convince them to give you more money the better you do or something. Perhaps if you convince them to spend a bit more because of the wait, then it may be worth waiting. And plenty of time to do research and find the perfect bike!

    Other than that I really don't know what you can do, except try & enjoy the bike you currently have, remembering what riding is all about - and at least you're not on a Wallmart bike!

    I was supposed to wait untill December this year, then it turned into June (you can always use that - surely there will be big bike sales in your area around June?) And I just ordered my bike two days ago. In the end I just said got to buy a bike soon so I can stop thinking about it so much. But to us it didn't make that much difference as I wasn't going to save anymore cash if I purchased in a few months time.

    Good Luck anyway.
    energetix



  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by energetix
    Yes it's hard not to loose appreciation of your current bike when you have a new one on the horizon!

    Obviously your parent's believe that your new bike should be a reward for you doing well on the piano. Be a real bugger if you don't pass the test though! Anyway, get an idea of how much they will let you spend on a new bike - and If you're sure that you will do really well then convince them to give you more money the better you do or something. Perhaps if you convince them to spend a bit more because of the wait, then it may be worth waiting. And plenty of time to do research and find the perfect bike!

    Other than that I really don't know what you can do, except try & enjoy the bike you currently have, remembering what riding is all about - and at least you're not on a Wallmart bike!

    I was supposed to wait untill December this year, then it turned into June (you can always use that - surely there will be big bike sales in your area around June?) And I just ordered my bike two days ago. In the end I just said got to buy a bike soon so I can stop thinking about it so much. But to us it didn't make that much difference as I wasn't going to save anymore cash if I purchased in a few months time.

    Good Luck anyway.
    THanks for the helpful advice. Last night I rode my friends '05 Norco 125 and I loved it. I'm really thinking about this bike. Do you know anything about this bike?(would it be ok for trails) And I know this sounds childish/stupid but I really liked the orange colour on the '05, and I don't really like this year's white colour. By the time it's september/october I won't be able to do the local trail anymore because it will be too wet, so do u think I should just wait for the 2007 bikes? (Also, there is a big blowout sale in October, so I may be able to get a really good fork for cheap to get on my future bike. Good idea?

    And BTW, what bike are you getting?

  5. #5
    Going for a ride......
    Reputation: energetix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,146
    Before considering buying parts for your 'future bike' I'd do some research on which bike you want to buy fist. If you can get hold of a bicycle buyers guide (magazie) that would be a great start, or do research on the manufacturers websites and mtbr. Could be worth talking to your local bike shop too to get an idea.

    First you've got to know your budget - what's your price range? And start from there.
    Next question to ask yourself is What type of riding do you plan on doing? To determine wether you are looking for a dirt jump bike, an xc bike, all mountain, full suspension or ridgid etc.
    Then research: get a list of all the suitable bikes that are withing your price range. If you can use a computer then create a spreadsheet even with all the specs for each bike side by side. From this you can narrow down your list to 2 or 3 that you are most interested in (be it looks, value for money etc). After that start asking peoples opinions of the bikes and see if you can get test rides on them.

    There is nothing wrong with buyng last years bike because you like the colour better - and you should be able to get it for less $$ than this years anyway. And it's usally well worth waiting for the sales.

    Me - I just ride out on whatever local trails I can get to, mostly xc style of riding - but I like a challenging up hill and then sketchy terrain back down. It's not beyond the limitations of the Specialized Hardrok I had but I was starting to notice that my riding style or ability had improved beyond the bike (well particularly the fork). For me it was more cost effective to buy a whole new bike than to upgrade the hardtail. So I'm getting a Ginat Trance 3. I could have waited 2 more monts untill the new models came in, but I really wanted this years - locally I wasn't likely to get it on sale (bike shop didn't have any on the floor and wasn't getting any more in unless someone wanted to buy) because I'm in a smaller town. And besides that I wanted the current model due to the frame style (changing for next year to what the curren US model looks like). So yeah that's me.

    Sorry I don't know much about the Norco 125 (not my style of riding). But I can give you a few brands that I would consider looking at:

    Giant (usually really good value for money)
    Specialized
    Norco
    Avanti
    Kona

    the above are my preferred ones, there are loads more, some more budget brands and some more boutique than the above.

    Just try not to spend too much time thinking about it like I have - and these forums too!
    energetix



  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kanaka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    23

    Stick with the Piano lessons

    Stick with the piano lessons. My mom let me quit piano when I was about 14. A couple of my siblings stuck with it and today I envy them.

    Enough about that. I'm assuming you want a hardtail, since that's what your friends' bikes are that you mentioned. The Norco 125 is a super beefy bike, and not cheap. It's probably overkill unless you intend to do huge jumps and drops. If you like your friend's Hardrock, why not get one of those?
    I would recommend at least the hardrock Comp Disk for those big 15" jumps
    - MSRP $600
    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...keTab=techspec
    Here are the features on this bike that I like
    ---Marzocchi fork. The cheaper Hardrocks have an RST fork, which is junk in my opinion. The only forks that will hold up to much abuse will come from Rock Shox, Marzocchi, and Manitou, etc.
    ---Hayes mechanical brakes. You won't get much better brakes at this price range
    ---SRAM drivetrain. The cheaper components are not going to last (Shimano "Altus", "Alivio", and such) The Shimano "Deore" line is the minimum necessary for serious riders in my opinion.

    I've always liked Kona - the Cinder Cone is in the same price range
    http://konaworld.com/shopping_cart/F...3&parentid=253

    If you want good value for money, check out Iron Horse - their Maverick Team is $379 at performancebike.com
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/....cfm?SKU=22317
    The Iron Horse Warrior Comp is a little nicer - $530 at Amazon.com
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ance&n=3375251

    I'm not suggesting you buy online. I'm just giving you an idea of what these bikes are worth. I personally would never buy a bike I hadn't ridden thoroughly. I also would suggest buying from your Local Bike Shop (LBS) so you can get support and get to know the owner or managers. If they see you are loyal, they may start giving you discounts on stuff - the owner of my LBS did anyway. If their List Price is way above the online merchants, print it out and bring it in to the store and see if you can bargain with them. Bike prices are sometimes quite flexible it seems.
    Last edited by kanaka; 04-29-2006 at 09:30 PM.

  7. #7
    Going for a ride......
    Reputation: energetix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,146
    I would agree Frame, Fork and Wheels are probably the most improtant components (and the most expensive poriton on the bike).

    Giant STP would be along the same line of the Norco One25 - and I know STP's seem to be pretty popular here in Australia from what I've heard simply because they are good .

    I think in regards to Shimano, I would aim for Alivio at the lowest - maybe a deore rear derailleur but Alivio shifters have done me well. It depends how much you are looking to spend really, best to stay in your means. From what I know Sram X7 is the equivalent to Deore LX, not sure how the lower range of Sram is though.

    http://www.giantbicycle.net
    energetix



  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by kanaka
    Stick with the piano lessons. My mom let me quit piano when I was about 14. A couple of my siblings stuck with it and today I envy them.

    Enough about that. I'm assuming you want a hardtail, since that's what your friends' bikes are that you mentioned. The Norco 125 is a super beefy bike, and not cheap. It's probably overkill unless you intend to do huge jumps and drops. If you like your friend's Hardrock, why not get one of those?
    I would recommend at least the hardrock Comp Disk for those big 15" jumps
    - MSRP $600
    http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkM...keTab=techspec
    Here are the features on this bike that I like
    ---Marzocchi fork. The cheaper Hardrocks have an RST fork, which is junk in my opinion. The only forks that will hold up to much abuse will come from Rock Shox, Marzocchi, and Manitou, etc.
    ---Hayes mechanical brakes. You won't get much better brakes at this price range
    ---SRAM drivetrain. The cheaper components are not going to last (Shimano "Altus", "Alivio", and such) The Shimano "Deore" line is the minimum necessary for serious riders in my opinion.

    I've always liked Kona - the Cinder Cone is in the same price range
    http://konaworld.com/shopping_cart/F...3&parentid=253

    If you want good value for money, check out Iron Horse - their Maverick Team is $379 at performancebike.com
    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/....cfm?SKU=22317
    The Iron Horse Warrior Comp is a little nicer - $530 at Amazon.com
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...ance&n=3375251

    I'm not suggesting you buy online. I'm just giving you an idea of what these bikes are worth. I personally would never buy a bike I hadn't ridden thoroughly. I also would suggest buying from your Local Bike Shop (LBS) so you can get support and get to know the owner or managers. If they see you are loyal, they may start giving you discounts on stuff - the owner of my LBS did anyway. If their List Price is way above the online merchants, print it out and bring it in to the store and see if you can bargain with them. Bike prices are sometimes quite flexible it seems.
    Thanks for the advice, I'm coming up to 14 in september, and I guess I still have lots of time to think about which bike to choose.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    61

    All the responses so far have been great

    I don't have much to add to the get the new bike part of the thread.

    In the meantime there are some things to do to make your bike more rideable through the summer.

    1. download the service manual for your fork and see if you can get it working again. Forks at that level are really pretty simple on the inside, you can usually take them apart, service them (replace oil, lube what have you) and see an improvment. Just be patient when working on them and remember that most of the parts are alloy and relatively fragile.

    2. replace your brake pads with a quaility pad like Kool Stop or Aztec. A lot of stock V-brake pads are pretty hard really and don't stop well, especially if they are old.

    3. learn to do all your own work, and maintain your bike well. I taught my self how to work on my own stuff out of a BIke Mechanics book when I was your age and it has always served me well (too many more years later than I care to mention).

    Maybe if your folks see how much effort you are putting into keeping your old bike up to speed they will know how seriously you need a new one. If you get home from a ride and just complain about how much better your friends bikes are they may think you _want_ a new bike rather than _need_ a new bike.

    I went through a patch when I was 16 where I broke the rear axle twice and replaced all the drive side rear wheel spokes in 2 months. Came home one day and my Mom had bought me a nice new hand built rear wheel (the guys at the local shop knew me by name and she actually got a good one). I did not realize it then but money was pretty tight for us and it was a pretty big deal.

    Hope this helps

    FT

    BTW - the 'new bike lust' never goes away, no matter how many nice bikes you have already.

  10. #10
    Going for a ride......
    Reputation: energetix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,146
    If you decide to service the fork - make sure you use the correct size spanner to get it undone! After servicing mine about 3 times with a shifter it got almost rounded (why do they make it out of plastic!).. If your fork is like a Judy TT - just elastomer / spring with no damping oile or anything it's pretty simple to service like Fat Trackie said (check out your fork manual or download one). Just greasing up inside (with synthetic grease) will improve performance if only for a little while. Also you have heard of putting a few drops of lube on the stanchions where they meet the lowers?

    I never did get adventourous enough to completely dismantle mine though (o rings seals etc) for fear of ruining it due to not having the proper tools.
    energetix



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •