1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    those that do thier own work

    For those that do thier own work on your bikes. I need to adjust my derailers but how do you get it off the ground so you can spin the back tire? Do you all have bike stands or what? If that's the case what's a good affordible one?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Most probably use a store bought stand or a makeshift one. If you are looking for a solid stand thats not very expensive Performance bike has a Spin Doctor collapsible stand for $89. I've been looking into picking one up myself and this is the best deal I've found on a new one. They do get pretty pricey. Anyways, either that or perhaps you could find a used one.

  3. #3
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    You don't have to have a stand to tune a derailleur. Just flip your bike over and rest it on the saddle and handle bars. If you need to elevate the bars to clear the shifters etc, just use a block of wood, brick, book, etc. I now have a stand , and it is easier but you do not have to have one.

  4. #4
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    if you have a basement with some exposed pipes running along the ceiling, try hooking your saddle over one of them.... provided they are secure/beefy enough.

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    I just put the bike upside down on the ground. You can hook the seat over any handy rail or suspend the bike on a rope, too.

  6. #6
    bi-winning
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    For years, i just adjusted, and test rode. You can even adjust cable tension at the shifter while riding to dial it in.

    For my birthday this year, i got a Park PCS-9, which is handy for larger repair jobs.

    I still find actually riding the bike to be very beneficial while tuning, as sometimes a bike that shifts fine on the stand, may seem just a little off while under some load.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  7. #7
    squish is good
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkj__
    For years, i just adjusted, and test rode. You can even adjust cable tension at the shifter while riding to dial it in.

    For my birthday this year, i got a Park PCS-9, which is handy for larger repair jobs.

    I still find actually riding the bike to be very beneficial while tuning, as sometimes a bike that shifts fine on the stand, may seem just a little off while under some load.
    X2 - I just flip it to get it in the ballpark and then ride it to dial it in.
    Bike good, work bad.

  8. #8
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    +1 bike stand. I have had the $80 Nashbar stand for a few years; a few parts recently broke and Nashbar is sending replacements for free.

    Anthony

  9. #9
    Hardbooter
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    If you're planning on flipping the bike, do so on grass or carpet or something nonabrasive. Your saddle and grips will thank you.

  10. #10
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    An easy and cheap solution: Place a short 2x4 (bat, rod, stick....) extended off a table top (workbench, washer, dryer...) with some weight on it. Throw a rag over it and stick the tt on it.

    I throw a short 2x4 under a heavy tool box that's sitting on a workbench, two pieces if I need both wheels off the ground. It only takes a couple secs to setup or dismantle my custom work stand.

    This is a pic jleecong posted in the huge forge thread (were I got the idea). Using a some weight, you don't have to attach the boards.

    Last edited by rlouder; 08-10-2008 at 07:33 AM.

  11. #11
    wyrd bi ful rd
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    dont need to spend too much on a stand but do get one as it really helps if you decide in future to build a bike up yourself ... helps with disc brakes adjustments too ...

  12. #12
    mighty sailin' man
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    I use my trunk mount bike rack as a work stand. Just need to be careful when spraying lubes not to get it on the car finish. Or use the wifes car...

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by HatesIT
    I use my trunk mount bike rack as a work stand. Just need to be careful when spraying lubes not to get it on the car finish. Or use the wifes car...

    +1

    I've been thinking about making my own work stand with a truing jig however.

  14. #14
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    I use a workstand. I bought it last year when I decided to begin doing my own work on my and my family's bikes. I had been "sort of" getting by without a stand, but the more work you do, the less fun it is without a good stand.

    I bought one of those "Ultimate" brand stands, because that's what my dealer happened to have in stock one day. I like the stand for portability. It's nice to have one to toss in the car when I go somewhere. However, the stand is a bit wobbly, and it will fall over (or blow over in the wind!) if you don't pay attention to how you have the bike oriented on the stand. I have it in mind someday to buy a Park stand, but that's probably a "next year" thing.

    One thing: if you do buy a stand, I highly recommend that you get one that is height-adjustable. I like being able to raise my bike so that whatever part I'm working on is easy to reach while I'm standing. The other week I had occasion to use a non-adjustable Park stand, and it sucked having to bend almost double just to crank the pedals to test the shifting.

    I'm afraid I've gotten to the point where I like to tinker almost as much as I like to ride. There are days -- when I'm swapping parts between bikes -- when two stands would be nice.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rlouder
    An easy and cheap solution: Place a short 2x4 (bat, rod, stick....) extended off a table top (workbench, washer, dryer...) with some weight on it. Throw a rag over it and stick the tt on it.

    I throw a short 2x4 under a heavy tool box that's sitting on a workbench, two pieces if I need both wheels off the ground. It only takes a couple secs to setup or dismantle my custom work stand.

    This is a pic jleecong posted in the huge forge thread (were I got the idea). Using a some weight, you don't have to attach the boards.

    Thats funny, I did the exact same thing, Id rather spend the money some where else. Cost me 2 dollars and work good for my needs.

  16. #16
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    I use my head.


    Put my head under the saddle and lift, then I can spin my pedals and adjust with my hands.

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