1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Thompson Elite or Carbon Steat Posts?


    Both are on sale and right now for the same price of $100.

    The Thompson Elite typically sells for $100
    The Easton Carbon EC90 typically sells for $200 but is on sale for $100 at this minute.

    The carbon is 100grams lighter, 190g vs 290g on the 31.6 models

    The Thompson definitely looks cooler and I hear it's adjust-ability is superb.
    However it's hard to turn down a light carbon post on sale.

    Anyone have experience with the Easton or Pros of Carbon in general?

    What do you all think?

  2. #2
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    Salsa Salsa Pro Moto 2 Seatpost 31.6 x 350 - Fitness & Sports - Bikes & Accessories - Replacement Parts

    Half the price, splitting hairs weight. Dual bolt is as adjustable as anything on the market, and just as reliable.

    If your current post works for you, you're just wasting money. Theres no gains from posts.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    If your current post works for you, you're just wasting money. There's no gains from posts.
    I was partly looking to save weight and also interested in the dampening features of the carbon seat-post.

    My current seat post works but is rather heavy, and I think I could use the dampening benefits;
    due to my history of multiple back surgeries and still have bulging disks in my neck even now.
    I take 600mg of ibuprofen before every ride.

  4. #4
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    I use a 27.2 ti post with 20mm setback for dampening. Moots(old clamp) or Eriksen have good clamps. The Moots old clamp works fine as long as you progressively tighten it.

  5. #5
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Salsa Salsa Pro Moto 2 Seatpost 31.6 x 350 - Fitness & Sports - Bikes & Accessories - Replacement Parts

    Half the price, splitting hairs weight. Dual bolt is as adjustable as anything on the market, and just as reliable.

    If your current post works for you, you're just wasting money. Theres no gains from posts.
    Wrong!! There is plenty to gain from a carbon post beyond the weight savings.... Especially if you're on hardtail or rigid bike. I put a Nashbar carbon post on my rigid mtb and it really smoothed out the ride... Of course it didn't hurt that I also have a carbon handlebar.
    Nashbar SS 29er
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  6. #6
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    I just put a carbon handle bar on with squishy grips to lessen the bite.

    I decided to order the Easton Carbon EC90 seat post 190g 31.6

    It should be here next week.
    Last edited by Trail_Blazer; 08-09-2012 at 05:56 AM.

  7. #7
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    I think you made the right choice.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by schristie11 View Post
    I just put a carbon handle bar on with squishy grips to lessen the bite.

    I decided to order the Easton Carbon EC90 seat post 190g 31.6

    It should be here next week.
    Yup. carbon post and carbon handlebars rule. You will notice a big difference.
    Nashbar SS 29er
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BIGABIGD View Post
    Yup. carbon post and carbon handlebars rule. You will notice a big difference.
    I've already noticed my handle bars flex a lot, it's strange at first but after I'm into a ride I forget. They don't "bend" just flex with the bumps.

  10. #10
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    What kind of carbon bar is it. I have a Nashbar bar that weighs 155gm and it doesn't flex at all.. And I weigh 255.
    Nashbar SS 29er
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by schristie11 View Post
    I've already noticed my handle bars flex a lot, it's strange at first but after I'm into a ride I forget. They don't "bend" just flex with the bumps.
    I have 2 Easton Heavens and Answer Protaper no flex at all.
    2014 S-Works Epic WC
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishpitbull View Post
    I have 2 Easton Heavens and Answer Protaper no flex at all.
    My Handle bar is a 2012 Easton Haven Carbon 711mm mounted to a SRAM AKA stem.

    The "flex" I am talking about is in reference to the dampening characteristics.
    I can not feel the bar move 5mm, but maybe 0.5mm under heavy load.
    It is a nice thing, but I have never felt it before so it is interesting.
    I hope my seat post is similar.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by schristie11 View Post
    My Handle bar is a 2012 Easton Haven Carbon 711mm mounted to a SRAM AKA stem.

    The "flex" I am talking about is in reference to the dampening characteristics.
    I can not feel the bar move 5mm, but maybe 0.5mm under heavy load.
    It is a nice thing, but I have never felt it before so it is interesting.
    I hope my seat post is similar.
    How much do you weigh? I'm 175 and they are stiff.
    2014 S-Works Epic WC
    2014 Yeti ARC
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishpitbull View Post
    How much do you weigh? I'm 175 and they are stiff.
    I am 160lb 5'9".
    They are very stiff they do not bend, but they have a slight rebound or bounce flex that soaks up the bumps.
    That's a feature I wanted and so I'm glad it does it.
    I'm an ultra sensitive person with minor ocd, so I notice everything that no one else does, esp if it's a 1/2mm super tiny thing, to me it is amplified. lol

  15. #15
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    Interesting....

    Quote Originally Posted by BIGABIGD View Post
    Wrong!! There is plenty to gain from a carbon post beyond the weight savings.... Especially if you're on hardtail or rigid bike. I put a Nashbar carbon post on my rigid mtb and it really smoothed out the ride... Of course it didn't hurt that I also have a carbon handlebar.
    How long have you been riding your CF seatpost? The reason I ask:

    Several years ago, I tried riding with several different CF seatposts. And initially, they were fine. But after a couple months of riding, the epoxy and mechanical interlock between the metal head and the post would start to work loose. Paying $100+ for a part that lasted less than a couple months seemed foolish. So I chose to go with a Thomson and have been riding them ever since, without incident.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    How long have you been riding your CF seatpost? The reason I ask:

    Several years ago, I tried riding with several different CF seatposts. And initially, they were fine. But after a couple months of riding, the epoxy and mechanical interlock between the metal head and the post would start to work loose. Paying $100+ for a part that lasted less than a couple months seemed foolish. So I chose to go with a Thomson and have been riding them ever since, without incident.
    Did you use carbon paste?
    I notice that on my carbon bars the clamps do slip if I am not using the paste because they are so slippery.
    I've seen parts loosen over time on my bikes because they were gingerly tightened and not over-tight.
    I also seen some stems advertize the shape of their clamp was made with carbon in mind where some alum/steal stems my not be.

  17. #17
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    Apples and Oranges

    Quote Originally Posted by schristie11 View Post
    Did you use carbon paste?
    I notice that on my carbon bars the clamps do slip if I am not using the paste because they are so slippery.
    I've seen parts loosen over time on my bikes because they were gingerly tightened and not over-tight.
    I also seen some stems advertize the shape of their clamp was made with carbon in mind where some alum/steal stems my not be.
    The seatpost wasn't slipping in the seat tube. The epoxy broke loose at the head (metal unit that clamps on to the seat rails), causing my saddle to move side to side and back and forth while pedaling.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by BIGABIGD View Post
    Wrong!! There is plenty to gain from a carbon post beyond the weight savings.... Especially if you're on hardtail or rigid bike. I put a Nashbar carbon post on my rigid mtb and it really smoothed out the ride... Of course it didn't hurt that I also have a carbon handlebar.

    Carbon bar I can understand but that's also personal preference, not everyone like the additional flex on their bar. I have both alloy(s) and carbon, they just different flavor to me.

    Carbon seatpost for mountain biking however is difference. The benefit beyond weight saving is so little because it means the riders have to sit on the saddle while riding over bumps, who does that

    The biggest gain you can get from the seatpost is from adjustable post.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Carbon seatpost for mountain biking however is difference. The benefit beyond weight saving is so little because it means the riders have to sit on the saddle while riding over bumps , who does that
    Maybe you were being sarcastic?
    I have to sit while riding over bumps because many of the trails I ride have nothing but constant sharp rocky bumps, and never ever sitting down is not really an option.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by schristie11 View Post
    Maybe you were being sarcastic?
    I have to sit while riding over bumps because many of the trails I ride have nothing but constant sharp rocky bumps, and never ever sitting down is not really an option.
    No I was serious.

    Sitting while pedaling uphill is much different than siting while riding downhill. You are not taking as much punishment and a subtle lift off when clearing rocks and roots is plenty to prevent you from bruising your butt

    I have a few carbon posts that I've tried side-by-side and blind test before I could not tell the difference. I would agree about more comfort of carbon post on a road bike as it can absorb more road vibration not soaking up bumps.


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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    No I was serious.

    Sitting while pedaling uphill is much different than siting while riding downhill. You are not taking as much punishment and a subtle lift off when clearing rocks and roots is plenty to prevent you from bruising your butt
    So what about me who sometimes rides on flat trails (not up or down) of nothing but rock flats with loose rocks on top, no dirt.
    My new squishy tubeless large volume tires soak up a lot at 28psi, compared to tubes on factory tires that need 35psi (switched two weeks ago).

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by schristie11 View Post
    So what about me who sometimes rides on flat trails (not up or down) of nothing but rock flats with loose rocks on top, no dirt.
    My new squishy tubeless large volume tires soak up a lot at 28psi, compared to tubes on factory tires that need 35psi (switched two weeks ago).
    It's a good buy because it's on sale and light weight you can't go really go wrong with that especially if you are ultra sensitive and particular about your set up.

    I did many things to desensitized my personal preference especially seatpost height. For some the seat height has to be in the exact place everytime for me I use adj post I practice riding a few cm too low or too high so it wouldn't bother me as much. Unless I just add a new bike I'd try to ride different bikes on every ride so I would not be bothered on different riding positions.

    Let us know how you like the post.

  23. #23
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    I have been thinking about the same 2 seat posts. Though my bike is only about a wk old i'm already having the upgrade bug. Just trying to make it lighter and more to my liking. How's the seat post working out for you so far? (i know it's still a short time)
    2 wheels > 4

  24. #24
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    I LOVE the seat post.
    It looks cool (people notice it) and it feels good.
    I think itís better looking in person then online photos, but I wish it were a high gloss finish like the 3T carbon and the alum Thompson.

    So, I was very motivated to try a carbon seat post because I have neck pain by bulging disks from whiplash years ago and also two major low-back surgeries from disks.

    It does lessen the vibrations of small loose rocks and gravel.
    Prevents sharp bumps from transferring up my spine causing neck and head aches.
    The carbon seat post definitely lessened pain on a rocky ride.

    Install Notes:
    The clamp bolts are pretty close to the center
    Be sure to use a long extension and or tiny ratchet to tighten them.
    Be careful when tightening them, do not let the tool touch the carbon bar, or it will badly show the rub marks and scratches.
    Lube the post heavily with carbon grease before inserting it!!
    I use a quick release (no bolt to torque) so I cautiously clamped it.


    I thought I wanted a dropper post, but I hated the price and weight.
    Recently I got a saddle that was a little smaller and now I can lean way back without needing to drop the post.

    No regrets!!

    It's 1LB lighter than my factory alum post.

    FYI:
    I added carbon handle bars with cushy grips which greatly \ lessened joint and in my fingers and shoulders.
    I can actually stay holding onto the bars on a hard landing (jump) because the bars do not transfer the full shock.
    The seat post does the same and prevents being bucked off.
    Last edited by Trail_Blazer; 08-13-2012 at 08:40 PM.

  25. #25
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    thanks.
    Well I thinking of doing all 3 at once (seat post, stem and bars). Just have to figure out which brand and type to go with.
    Maybe i'll keep it all Giant since its a Giant bike or go with Easton on the components. still reading around before i make any decision.

    I'm a noob to mtb. So i'm getting in as much info. as i can before taking the plunge. Already took a 1k plunge on the bike lol.
    2 wheels > 4

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