1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Is there any point in getting my new bike checked by the LBS?

    I recently purchased a new bike from the LBS and I wasn't too pleased on their assembly of the bike. The front brakes were already touching the rotors while disengaged and the gears were setup very poorly. It was really obvious that the front derailleur was crooked and the H and L screws were all off (the very FIRST gear change on the bike caused the chain to fall off the cranks ). However, I do get a year of service from them and was recommended to take the bike in after about a month of use.

    My question is, is it worth doing this? And what exactly is 'standard' procedure when they check the bike?

  2. #2
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    you should be able to fix your brake and shifting problems yourself. check out parktool.com, they have a repair section that covers most common repairs/adjustments.

  3. #3
    dh1
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    Well,

    If it was set up this poorly, you shouldn't have accepted delivery....but that cat is already out of the bag.

    It would be worth taking back in, but give them a list of complaints about the bike and talk with the manager in a calm and personable manner. If they get the impression that you are a reasonable guy, they will strive to make you happy. If they get the impression you are difficult to please, often they won't even try.

    Don't just drop the bike off and expect them to fix all of your squawks without your guidance. That would assume a level of attention to detail that they didn't convey during the purchase.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, that's the site I've been using as a reference to fix up the brakes and the gears for a while now. Is there any checks/repairs that would require the LBS? I'm quite comfortable taking apart the entire bike except the cassette because I do not have the tool.

  5. #5
    dh1
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktse
    Yeah, that's the site I've been using as a reference to fix up the brakes and the gears for a while now. Is there any checks/repairs that would require the LBS? I'm quite comfortable taking apart the entire bike except the cassette because I do not have the tool.

    Removal of the cassette is a piece of cake. The tool to remove shimano/Sram lockrings only cost me about 8 bucks at the LBS. I don't use a chainwhip either...I hold an old chain around the cassette with a pair of vice grips and it has never not worked for me.

    If you have the aptitude and knowledge to setup and calibrate your own shifters and brakes, I wouldn't bother going in for the free tune up...unless something needed warranty attention. I can adjust my brakes and derailleurs faster than it would take me to load the bike onto my rack and drive to the LBS.

    The only other reason to go in for tune ups- wheel truing....unless you can do that too.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by dh1
    Well,

    If it was set up this poorly, you shouldn't have accepted delivery....but that cat is already out of the bag.

    It would be worth taking back in, but give them a list of complaints about the bike and talk with the manager in a calm and personable manner. If they get the impression that you are a reasonable guy, they will strive to make you happy. If they get the impression you are difficult to please, often they won't even try.

    Don't just drop the bike off and expect them to fix all of your squawks without your guidance. That would assume a level of attention to detail that they didn't convey during the purchase.
    I fully agree with you... but I do have an excuse. I had already paid for the bike when I got there I was simply handed the receipt and the bike. I was so caught up in the moment that I took the bike under the assumption it was correctly assembled. Well now I know.

    Let it be known I'm not angry, just rather disappointed for the mistakes. I've certainly seen far worse assembled bikes at the local sports shop (Rotors shouldn't be bending 1 cm when engaged right )

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dh1
    ... The only other reason to go in for tune ups- wheel truing....unless you can do that too.
    Truing would be a problem... it's one of those things on my to do list, but I'm pretty sure I don't ride aggressively enough to bend a rim.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktse
    I recently purchased a new bike from the LBS and I wasn't too pleased on their assembly of the bike. The front brakes were already touching the rotors while disengaged and the gears were setup very poorly. It was really obvious that the front derailleur was crooked and the H and L screws were all off (the very FIRST gear change on the bike caused the chain to fall off the cranks ). However, I do get a year of service from them and was recommended to take the bike in after about a month of use.

    My question is, is it worth doing this? And what exactly is 'standard' procedure when they check the bike?
    I think you owe it to them and yourself to bring it back. There is no excuse for the bike not running like a top out of the shop. I say "owe it to them" because if I were the manager I would want to do some extra training with the dolt you set yours up.

    Yes, you should learn to do your own maintenance, and eventually invest in some tools, but that will come in time. May as well let them do it at first. If you were going to do all your own wrenching, including the initial set up, why bother buying from an LBS? Save some $ and buy it online.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ktse
    ... (Rotors shouldn't be bending 1 cm when engaged right )
    Some (all?) mechanical discs will bend the rotor slightly to stop. If you look at the brake pads, one remains stationary while the other will engage and bend the rotor towards the stationary pad.

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