1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Reputation: bnosam's Avatar
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    Talking the LBS down

    Any tips on getting the bike shop to bring their price down?
    "My fake plants died because I did not pretend to water them" - Mitch Hedburg

  2. #2
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    Sort of like buying a car...many have some wiggle room built into their price but do not expect too much

  3. #3
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    If you are a first time customer, I would expect even less wiggle room.

  4. #4
    I am a pathetic rider...
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    also depends on the price of the bike. I think haggling on a $400 beginner hardtail is pretty much futile, unless it is used or last years model, then you might have something; however bartering for a $6000 full XTR titanium framed MTB might actually get you somewhere.
    Save the Earth, Ride a Cyclist

  5. #5
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    cash.

  6. #6
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    Last time i was at the bike shop, i bought a crank and got into a very in depth conversation about mountain biking with the man. He told me where he rides, what bike he has, blah blah. He then marked my crank down 10 dollars and offered me a job.

  7. #7
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    If you are a frequent visitor at your LBS, then you've completed the first step. The owner probably knows your face, and knows that you like doing business with him.

    If it were me, I'd go to the LBS for something other than buying a bike at first. Then express an interest in the bike you want. Then leave. Rinse, repeat. If he has more than one model of that same bike, then you can afford to take your time.

    Some owners or workers will bring the price down (usually the bike is marked up anyway). If they don't, ask if they can offer a special deal if paid in CASH, or even check. Owners have their reasons to prefer these payments, and it can benefit the both of you.

  8. #8
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    I was shopping for a commuter/road hybrid recently and set my budget at $450. Anything higher, and I would be better off just tuning up my spare mtb and adding some slicks.

    Went to an LBS and talked to the manager about what would be best for me. I let him know my budget, but I was a real customer and not a tire-kicker. We then came across a Raleigh Cadent, which fit me like a glove, for $500.

    I was totally honest and said, "I know it's not much, but even at $450 I'm stretching it. I couldn't stretch any more to $500." So he checked his books and said he could do $450, and I was sold.

    I'm sure you could also work in discounts on accessories and stuff to sweeten your deal, but it was my first time at the shop and the guy didn't know me from Adam. After shopping around and getting to know what these bikes go for around here, I was happy to get $450.

  9. #9
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    I have been going in and looking at a cannonade F3 from last year for a few weeks. They have 2 F3s, one for 1100 and one for 1200. They switch the sign regularly between the 2
    Anyway..I am hoping to get them down on price over time. or I wont buy the bike.

    Jonathan
    Replacing the cables and housing on your brakes/shifters feels like getting a new bike for $40.

  10. #10
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    As in anything else, shop around. I just bought and I couldn't get one shop to go below MSRP on a $850 bike and another took $160 off a $690 bike.

    Be polite. Look at accessories. Ask for military/student/whatever discount. Often all it takes is asking.

  11. #11
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    In our shop, we're not allowed to bargain at all. The best we can do is price match; however, there's another Trek dealer not too far that is pretty lenient and all you have to do is bring us one of their cards with the model and their price on the back and we'll do it. And for nice people/repeat customers/big spenders, we can be pretty nice- a guy came in and bought a bike twice his original budget, as well as tons of accessories, signed up for the Trek CC so the shop saved 3%, and we knocked a couple hundred off his price.

  12. #12
    Lionel Hutz, Esq.
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    Probably not going to get the bike discounted. The mark-ups aren't that high on the expensive stuff. However, you can probably get some accessories tossed in or discounted at the time of sale.

    Best advice, don't give them any reason to think you're just another guy looking at the shop so you can buy online. In fact, I wouldn't even mention the word "internet." Be a good customer first, the deals will come later. I always try to help out customers I know will come back and do business.
    2007 Trek Fuel EX 8
    1999 Trek 7000 --- Dragonfly Green = Sexy
    2002 Trek 2100
    2008 Felt New Belgium Cruiser

  13. #13
    Hike n' Bike
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    Just to give you an idea, some bikes have lots of mark up in them Specelized is one of them. I bought a Demo 7 1 in 07. Retail on it was 3199.99, I believe the A teir dealer cost on the bike was 1930ish, I paid 2500 and I was ok with that. Another example the 08 Diamondback Mission 3 retailed at 1599.99 my co worker took it home for 1200 even, no tax due to out of state sale.

    There is mark up in bikes, both of these sales are rather unique the Dback was from my LBS that ive delt with for years who I treat very well and he treats me well. The Demo was a little tougher for me to get but I did

  14. #14
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    As said, try to pay cash. Try to work in a bundle deal with accessories.

  15. #15
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    Something not mentioned yet here is flat rate discounts for bike club members. I've bought several things from different LBS and gotten 10-15% discount based on being a member of the local club. Something to look into anyways.

  16. #16
    Bearded highlighter
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    get to know the owners really well, i get a 10% discount on everything i buy at my LBS because i go to hang out and talk shop with most of the workers. It took about 2 months of weekly visits to get the discount though

  17. #17
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    I saw a great example of CASH the other day, me and a buddy went into the LBS, and he wanted a Fisher Marlin, the price tag said $620 +tax (~$660). He told the guy he had $600 in cash, and they let him have it for $600 out the door.
    Adam Ann Arbor, MI

  18. #18
    Aquaman
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    IMHO 10%-20% in not uncommon for a bike. You should get a discount on the accessories you buy also. That is usually 20%...more if you are spending big bucks. No $1000 is not big bucks. Do not let anyone tell you that the mark up on bikes is not that much, they are lying. Accessories mark up is almost always 100%. There are a few good suggestions on here like being a member at certain organizations or clubs. My favorite is also to pay cash; CC companies usually charge a retailer 1%-3% for a purchase. Now for the guys who say "be a good customer"..."come in and talk shop"..."get to know the owner"... It is the LBS job to get to know the customer...talk shop to him and make the customer a loyal consumer. With the Internet and the economy dropping faster than a hookers dress in a motel 6 marginal bikes shops will not survive.

  19. #19
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    20% for accessories, no tax on anything, and $45 of each bike. Wife and I each bought one at the same time. Saved us some SERIOUS cash. And we got a great trade-in on bikes we hated. Coolness.
    1x9 Hardtail, yummy.....

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