1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Suspension

  1. #1
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    Suspension

    I have a 26" Genesis V2100 full-suspension mtb, which I just do some general train riding with. I really want to get into some endure/downhill racing and was wondering what type of suspension setup I would need. Would a 150mm fork be too big? A 100mm too small? And should I go with air or coil/spring? Any other help on my bike setup for this would be great, thanks

    I also saw that Curtis Keene runs 150mm and he does some of the stuff I want to get into.

  2. #2
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    That bike is not capable of safely being set up as a dh racing rig.

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    What about enduro? What's the highest fork I can run?

  4. #4
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    its probably not going to work with enduro either. With a stock travel of 80mm, I wouldn't suggest anything over 100mm for that frame. Most enduro rigs run 140-160mm of travel up front.

  5. #5
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    In the early 80's I rolled a Sears road bike (definition stretched) into a bike shop and asked what I could do to upgrade it to a better performing bike. I was told what I think everyone else will tell you... nothing.

    That bike you have will take you along paved and hard packed paths but unfortunately there is nothing you can do beyond that. Enjoy it for what it is and when you are able/willing to buy a real mountain bike move on.

    John
    1995 Trek 970 - 80mm Atom Race
    1992 Serotta T-Max - 70mm Z3 Light
    1993 GT All Terra - 46mm Mag 21

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    You should find a local race and show up just to watch ,you will learn a lot.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
    In the early 80's I rolled a Sears road bike (definition stretched) into a bike shop and asked what I could do to upgrade it to a better performing bike. I was told what I think everyone else will tell you... nothing.

    That bike you have will take you along paved and hard packed paths but unfortunately there is nothing you can do beyond that. Enjoy it for what it is and when you are able/willing to buy a real mountain bike move on.

    John
    Eh..I had a reply, but John here has summed things up nicely. Tbh, I'm not even sure you could upgrade your bike to an enduro level if you wanted.

    Understand, the geometry of bikes is specific...that means you can't throw a 160 travel fork on a bike that was engineered for 80. You will suffer a catastrophic failure of the frame...while riding...down fast stuff. That's bad.

    Additionally, your bike is not capable (I think) of running disc brakes. When your going fast, you need that stopping power. Technically you may be able to fit the bike with disc...but at an expense that is much more than what you paid for the bike.

    My advice....hang around here..read..watch the videos...learn. Ride the piss out of what you have while saving $$$ for the rig you want.

  8. #8
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    When I first got back into riding I bought one of those. I replaced forks and rear shock. 100mm works for forks and 6.5-7" on the rear shock. Can't go any larger.

    And u can ride basic single track trails, no jumps etc. Nothing about that frame will hold up to that kind of abuse for more than a couple rides.

    What your wanting to do that bike will only get u killed. Its not a bad bike but never intended to do anything like your wanting and won't survive it.

    As everyone else has said, save your money for something better. WalMart is not the place to try and buy a bike to do what you see the pros ride.
    Trek Marlin 29er

    Like It, Love It, Want Some More Of It!

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