1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Suggest some budget multitool

    Looking forward to buy a multitool that is sturdy and long lasting. However, do not want to spend much on it as I will usually be needed only the allen keys and the flat headed and phillips screw drivers for basic fixes. Thanks.
    2013 Trek 4300

  2. #2
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    The topeak hexus 2 had been great for me. The chain break works really well. That's something you should definitely have with you even if you never need it.

    I got it for 15 on ebay

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    Last edited by ou2mame; 3 Weeks Ago at 11:52 AM.

  3. #3
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    When I replaced my chain about a month ago I thought I would have to get the LBS to do it for me. My uncle had a Crank Brothers multitool that had everything you really need for basic repairs, including a chain tool. This thing is sturdy, with a completely metal frame. If you want to spend ~8 more bucks, invest in one. I just got one Amazon for 23 and some change. Pretty much the same price on Amazon and PricePoint.

    Crank Brothers Multi-17 Tool | Crank Brothers | Brand | www.PricePoint.com

    Amazon.com : Crank Brothers Multi Bicycle Tool (19-Function, Silver) : Bike Multifunction Tools : Sports & Outdoors

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maroof View Post
    Looking forward to buy a multitool that is sturdy and long lasting. However, do not want to spend much on it as I will usually be needed only the allen keys and the flat headed and phillips screw drivers for basic fixes. Thanks.
    That's pretty much all a multi-tool is. Allen keys, and screw drivers. Some have a chain breaker, some don't. I personally don't like multi-tool chain breakers even though two out of the three tools I own have one. You could even just go over your bike and figure out the 2 or 3 sizes of allen keys you need to cover the majority of the bike, throw in a small screw driver and call it a day.

    Something like this works perfect for adjustments and trail side fixes...

    Suggest some budget multitool-040216344.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  6. #6
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    15mm combo wrench. As mentioned select few Allen wrenches. Small crescent wrench. A screwdriver with a few bits. Patches & a pump. Chainbreaker if you have one.
    I realize most multi tools have these on board. I would rather work with full sized tools rather than a multitool. Trail fixes are inherently not fun. You're mad because you just jammed a 2" mesquite thorn thru your brand new tire. Or you dumped your bike and need to realign your bars. Bent hangers, Stick in the front mech and so on. A few ounces of weight & the right tool just might get you back on track quicker with less frustration.
    I ride for my own pleasure & exercise so a few ounces won't break me.
    Nub, I just got one of those drivers yesterday in an allen set @ WW. Don't know if I trust the plastic handle....

  7. #7
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    I've had mine for several years and use it quite often for bike and non-bike related things. It's held up great. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it, especially for a bike kit that won't get used all that often. I might not use it in a shop setting or for heavy duty stuff, but for bikes and light household chores, it's great.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  8. #8
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    Buy Fix It Sticks bicycle multi tools

    Support made in the US of A small-guy innovation. Works perfect..durable..useable. Need to add a small chain tool...the Park mini-brute fits the bill.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  9. #9
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    Thanks Nub. I'll put it in my kit.
    If it fails you have a long way to drive to come rescue me .....

  10. #10
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    haha...no problem. I'm always up for a road trip...lol
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  11. #11
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    This thread got me thinking about whether to include my Leatherman multi-tool in my pack. It's got a knife and pliers, both I think could come in handy. Plus, I've already got a multi-tool with a chain breaker that I carry at the moment.

  12. #12
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    Set my bag up for a ride Friday. Stanley multi bit screwdriver, small crescent, tire gauge, standard cheap multi tool,valve stem tool, slime bandaids, 5&6 mm allen wrenches & chainbreaker. In my backpack, bottle of slime, new tube & spoke wrench.
    Frame mount pump. Pumps a tire up to 35 pounds in about two minutes.

  13. #13
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    There's a whole thread about this lol

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    There's a whole thread about this lol

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    More than one. It's one of the more common asked questions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC_Giant View Post
    This thread got me thinking about whether to include my Leatherman multi-tool in my pack. It's got a knife and pliers, both I think could come in handy. Plus, I've already got a multi-tool with a chain breaker that I carry at the moment.
    Little heavy but in a pack, not a terrible idea. A small knife tucked away somewhere is never a bad idea.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  16. #16
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    Tube (even if you ride tubeless), patch kit if you are not tubeless, a small chain tool (Park Mini Chain brute), a quick-link (partial to KMC Magic Links), tire lever (Pedros), CO2(s) + inflator (pump if you are tube guy), a zip tie, a tire boot (can just use a dollar bill), and some sort of basic multi-tool (no need for the kitchen sink here). I like: Buy Fix It Sticks bicycle multi tools

    And to carry it all...www.backcountryreserach.com if you are not using a hydration pack.

    For longer rides with a higher penalty for walk-outs, a spare derailleur hanger (remember...you can always just convert to a single speed trailside), possibly an extra cleat bolt. Really...the key is to maintain your bike and keep it up, you will notice issues before they strand you (and your riding group) on the side of the trail. I see folks often carrying WAY too much stuff. I have fixed a lot of bikes trailside and find that what I have listed will fix most of anything beyond the really bad ones that you will likely walk regardless.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    That's pretty much all a multi-tool is. Allen keys, and screw drivers. Some have a chain breaker, some don't. I personally don't like multi-tool chain breakers even though two out of the three tools I own have one. You could even just go over your bike and figure out the 2 or 3 sizes of allen keys you need to cover the majority of the bike, throw in a small screw driver and call it a day.

    Something like this works perfect for adjustments and trail side fixes...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The Fix-it-Sticks are basically the same thing except you pick the individual keys and they are bonded in and you can use them in a "T" configuration.

    Buy Fix It Sticks bicycle multi tools
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  18. #18
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    I carry a Crankbros but I pulled the chain breaker and replaced it with a home made tire lever. I use the small park chain tool and that seems to work easier for me. I carry a good spoke wrench as well. I don't use the spoke tool often, but I don't like fumbling with it when I do and the CB tool (on the chain breaker) wasn't great. On a budget you could buy some short allens and one of those "Z" bend screwdrivers (and a rubber band) I did that for years. I like the Fix it Stick/Stanley idea and they do make allens compatible with that hex shaft size.
    The most expensive bike in the world is still cheaper than the cheapest open heart surgery.

  19. #19
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    Crank Brothers 19 function tool seems to be good for me. Thanks everyone!
    2013 Trek 4300

  20. #20
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    Well, honestly, my pack already sits on the heavy side, but it's hydro pack. It's got a 70oz res and I keep a specialized thorn resistant tube, specialized mini mtb pump and a Park tool aws11 hex set in it. Adding the Leatherman won't bother me much more.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by NC_Giant View Post
    This thread got me thinking about whether to include my Leatherman multi-tool in my pack. It's got a knife and pliers, both I think could come in handy. Plus, I've already got a multi-tool with a chain breaker that I carry at the moment.
    Well, a full-size Leatherman like the Wave is overkill for sure, large and heavy and the majority of the tools on it don't even fit anything on a bike. But, I keep a Leatherman Freestyle in my Camelbak. It's pretty minimalist, only 3 tools: a knife, and needle-nose pliers with a wire cutter. (BTW, they claim 5 tools, but they count some things twice.) Only like 3 1/2" long folded up, and all things handy to have that bike multitools don't normally have. A good compliment to a multitool.

    FWIW, I like the Topeak Mini-20 multitool. Very compact and nothing extra you don't need. I've even used the chainbreaker once to fix someone else's bike on the trail.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  22. #22
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    Stupid question, but what is a chain-breaker for? Y'all mean carry one *and* spare links, in case the chain breaks?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    The Fix-it-Sticks are basically the same thing except you pick the individual keys and they are bonded in and you can use them in a "T" configuration.

    Buy Fix It Sticks bicycle multi tools
    The Stanley tool only works with the bits included with it which are just a Phillips and straight screw driver on each end. The bits are smaller in diameter so a standard bit that you would use in a driver handle or drill won't fit. Kinda sucks because it would make for a really cheap multi-tool option that would work well. Those Fix It Sticks look awesome and they have one that you can switch out the bits, but they are pricey. If I didn't already have three multi-tools I'd probably consider one but there's nothing wrong with the ones I already have.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by boo radley View Post
    Stupid question, but what is a chain-breaker for? Y'all mean carry one *and* spare links, in case the chain breaks?
    It's a tool that pushes the pin out of a link so that the chain can be separated or "broken". Some chains don't have a quick link from the factory so they have to be broken to be removed from the bike or if you break a chain on the trail, you can remove the busted link(s) and use a quick link and/or spare links to repair the chain.

    Suggest some budget multitool-park_mini_chain_tool_600.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  25. #25
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    Same tool I use...one thing on chain tools..some of the multi tools have nearly worthless chain tools.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

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