1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Stupid Move

  1. #1
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    Stupid Move

    Well, it was just a matter of time. Hit the trails Friday. Was like 96 and humid here in Ocala. Bout 1 P.M. Being new I dont tackle the "expert" trails, yet. I did go to Vortex at Santos to see what the better riders were up to.

    Entry is via an elevated wooden walkway. Starts ground level, peaks at about three feet and than back down to ground level. The planks are about 18-20 inches wide.

    So if these planks were flat on the ground I imagine just about anybody could ride the length without going off onto the grass. funny but elevate a couple of feet and the mind does strange things.

    So I approach at slow speed low gear as it is at a slight grade and get to the top ride down the back side. No problem.

    Now time to go the other way. Again low gear slow speed to the top as I begin to go down the backside I make mistake #1 i look down not ahead. I actually see the front tire veering left and have a brain fart. I don't react. So front tire goes off, bike drops and i go down over bars. Very much like this video: Big dude gets owned Mtb crash - YouTube

    End result: Grade 3 AC separation, 3 fractured ribs, torn rhomboid muscles and nice bruises.

    So regarding the injury: I will heal without surgery. Actually i am currently using the affected arm (left) i work in neurology and consulted ortho. I will be fine.

    Couple of things: first I think I was going too slow. If more speed I believe i could have maneuvered better. I know advanced riders can almost stand still but Im no there yet.

    I also think with more speed I could have "possibly" pulled up on the bars and gotten front wheel higher than back and maybe have landed on rear wheel instead of doing an endo!

    Im 57 and weigh about 255 so it was a nice impact!!

    Any thoughts on where I messed up? Very odd, no tricks or rocks just a simple bridge and i blew it.

    Any thoughts are appreciated.

    Jay

  2. #2
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    Wow. hope you recover soon. They do call those qualifiers for a reason.

  3. #3
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    sorry to hear about your crash. hope your recovery is quick and painless.

    i think your assessment is correct. you were probably going too slow and focused on where you didn't want to go.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by stump humper View Post
    sorry to hear about your crash. hope your recovery is quick and painless.

    i think your assessment is correct. you were probably going too slow and focused on where you didn't want to go.
    Yup. But why the anxiety (fear) of going over a rather simple bridge? In my mind Im 20 something but for some reason my mind told me "this may not be a good idea" but I went for it.

    Maybe I really am 57??

  5. #5
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    Depending on the gear, a quick back pedal to get into a power position and then hard on that pedal while pulling up. This might have saved you from the endo.

    I suggest beginners practice this off a curb. Approach it slow, and just as your front is about to go off, pull the front up as you pedal hard to bring the rear under you.

    It's a skill you end up needing eventually if you start doing some technical riding.
    13 Lenz Lunchbox punkass

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by drjay9051 View Post
    Yup. But why the anxiety (fear) of going over a rather simple bridge? In my mind Im 20 something but for some reason my mind told me "this may not be a good idea" but I went for it.

    Maybe I really am 57??
    self preservation. no one wants to fall, even off a simple bridge. don't think about it too much next time. just find your line, stick to it, and look ahead.


    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    Depending on the gear, a quick back pedal to get into a power position and then hard on that pedal while pulling up. This might have saved you from the endo.

    I suggest beginners practice this off a curb. Approach it slow, and just as your front is about to go off, pull the front up as you pedal hard to bring the rear under you.

    It's a skill you end up needing eventually if you start doing some technical riding.
    agreed. this is an essential skill to master

  7. #7
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    I will add try to focus on the peak. A few quick pedals and you should be over the top and coasting down the other side.

  8. #8
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    Ouch, sorry to hear about it.

  9. #9
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    So you got the 'bump' on your shoulder right? I had a type III AC separation snowboarding a couple years ago. Sucks. Took me a good 12 weeks to get 'close' to normal. I'm pretty much fully functional now, but I really hate the deformity (guess I'm more vain than I thought I was). I can't throw a football like I used to ie, can't throw the ball as far, and can't throw for as long as I used to... about 20-25 minutes is all I can go, and my should will be 'talking' to me later.

    Getting old sucks. (I'm 48 now)

    Good luck to you.

    -Eric

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colo Springs E View Post
    So you got the 'bump' on your shoulder right? I had a type III AC separation snowboarding a couple years ago. Sucks. Took me a good 12 weeks to get 'close' to normal. I'm pretty much fully functional now, but I really hate the deformity (guess I'm more vain than I thought I was). I can't throw a football like I used to ie, can't throw the ball as far, and can't throw for as long as I used to... about 20-25 minutes is all I can go, and my should will be 'talking' to me later.

    Getting old sucks. (I'm 48 now)

    Good luck to you.

    -Eric
    Yes! I got the bump. Good thing it was my non dominant (left) shoulder.

    If it was my right things I take for granted like personal hygiene issues would be a real pain in the ass if you know what I mean.

  11. #11
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    A little more speed and don't over-think it! Hit it and forget it That's quite the list of injuries, heal up!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by drjay9051 View Post
    Yes! I got the bump. Good thing it was my non dominant (left) shoulder.

    If it was my right things I take for granted like personal hygiene issues would be a real pain in the ass if you know what I mean.
    LOL yes unfortunately I know all too well! Quite challenging to say the least

  13. #13
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    That injury sucks. I just had a fall about 4 months ago with the grade 3 AC seperation and 5 fractured ribs. Almost totally healed now

  14. #14
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    Ouch man, get well soon.

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    stick to the bunny slopes next time

  16. #16
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    Ouch! Mental note: eyes up, a little more speed and a tug upward on the bars....

  17. #17
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    That's crazy sorry to hear hope you heel up soon

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpAgetttt View Post
    stick to the bunny slopes next time
    Thanks. I appreciate your advice on how to handle obstacle.

    Not really sure of point of your post. Sarcasm ? Boredom ? Inborn animosity toward fellow bikers? Inability to help others.

    Anyway, happy biking. No I don't wish an injury upon you. Not my nature.

    J

  19. #19
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    Ouch and some thoughts...

    Sorry to hear about your crash. I hope you heal quickly. Take your time getting back in the saddle and do your rehab. (Sounding like my dad here) You may be able to handle cutting corners when you're young but you'll pay for it 20 years later when you're popping Advil like breath mints. I didn't listen to him when I was young but I sure wish I had.

    I agree with your assessment that you were going too low and in the wrong gear. Something that most new riders don't think about is that you have two gyroscopes in your wheels. The slower they're spinning, the less stable they are. The faster they're going, the more they fight to stay upright.

    A quick science experiment (if you're interested): Pull your front wheel off and hold the ends of the skewer. Spin the wheel slowly and tilt the wheel side to side. Then spin the wheel quickly and do the same thing. It will demonstrate that you're much more stable if your wheels are spinning faster vs. slower.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  20. #20
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    Don't mind SpAgetttt. He's getting off to a bad start here.

    Sorry to hear about your injury. A friend had a similar injury but had to have the hook put in to pull the shoulder back up until the ligament healed. Just had another friend break her collar bone last Thursday in a road bike accident. Common injury.

    Practice on low to the ground obstacles until you get your confidence and consistency up. I do this with jumps. I can hit and land a small jump perfectly 9 of 10 times but I'm not going for a larger one until I'm hitting it 10 of 10.

    Glad to hear you are still going at it in your 50's. Mountainbiking is a great sport for every age. I'm 46 and I feel like I'm still in my 20's most of the time too ;-)

  21. #21
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    Elevated structures are almost nonexistent where I live, except for some short bridges and low wooden walkways through wetland areas.

    If I were to ride any high structures, I'd definitely want to practice bailing out: jumping away from the bike and the structure to a safer landing.

    For other kinds of crashes, learning to tuck and roll, and some other ways to break (or not break) your fall without breaking your wrist or arm, is highly recommended.

    "how come my bike is up there and I am down here..."


    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  22. #22
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    Ouch. Sounds painful. Hope you heal up soon.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Elevated structures are almost nonexistent where I live, except for some short bridges and low wooden walkways through wetland areas.

    If I were to ride any high structures, I'd definitely want to practice bailing out: jumping away from the bike and the structure to a safer landing.

    For other kinds of crashes, learning to tuck and roll, and some other ways to break (or not break) your fall without breaking your wrist or arm, is highly recommended.

    "how come my bike is up there and I am down here..."

    Yes bailout would have been good idea. Thing is it happened so fast I just did not react.

    Tough thing now is getting back on the horse. i have no problem riding again: trails,rock gardens roots, climbs. My issue (purely psychological) will be this short bridge, As has been pointed out more speed, look ahead, be confident. I cannot and will not let the bridge win!!

    On the other hand, imagine another fall, same bridge, same spot, different shoulder!! No not going to happen. FOCUS! FOCUS! FOCUS!!!

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