1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Strange build looking for a ride

    Hey there everyone, My name is Aaron. I'm new here and new to moutain biking...kinda. I used to ride BMX (20") for years. Mostly street, and dirt jumping. I have been out of the sport for about 6 or 7 years. I would like to get back on a bike but the old 20" bmx is too small for me and I cant eat pavement like I used to. So that being said, I am 24 y/o about 6'3" tall usually around 160-170 pounds, less know cuz I have really bad pneumonia..first time I ever had it and man does it blow. I am looking for something like an all mountain ride that can still handle some air now and then. I would like to stay under $750 and dont have a problem buying used. Probably a hardtail since that is what I am used to. I am open to full suspension though.

    So now that I have exhausted all my MB knowledge, I am asking for reccomendations on a good bike to buy. Any help would be great!

  2. #2
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    this is just my two cents- but I am riding a HardRock Pro Disc by specialized and loving it. It is a burly bike.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by D4ng3r
    this is just my two cents- but I am riding a HardRock Pro Disc by specialized and loving it. It is a burly bike.
    If you dont mind me asking, what are your specs?

  4. #4
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    +1 on the hard rock but I'd opt for one of their "P" bikes for that usage!
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say. Joshua Stinebrink

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ae111black
    +1 on the hard rock but I'd opt for one of their "P" bikes for that usage!
    I just looked at this http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...sid=10P.AllMTN I like the bike, I cant find any weight specs on it though.

  6. #6
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    It really depends on what type of trails and who your ride with. Ask around locally to see what bikes are appropriate and popular.

    With your bmx background, I'm sure you'll adapt to any bike and do a good job.

    Something with a short chain stay and reasonable bb height for quick handling. A good fork will go a long way in steering accuracy and bump compliance.

    For $750, you might consider a used bike. Maybe look at a Cannondale F3 or F4.
    Just get out and ride!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002
    It really depends on what type of trails and who your ride with. Ask around locally to see what bikes are appropriate and popular.

    With your bmx background, I'm sure you'll adapt to any bike and do a good job.

    Something with a short chain stay and reasonable bb height for quick handling. A good fork will go a long way in steering accuracy and bump compliance.

    For $750, you might consider a used bike. Maybe look at a Cannondale F3 or F4.
    Honestly there are not many MTBers here in my area. I would be doing trails and whatever else catches my eye. Like I said before, I am out west alot too. I would love to ride with my dad, he is 60 y/o and doesnt do crazy steep stuff but he likes some technical stuff. I am not opposed to buying used at all. I used to race ATVs and ran Fox shocks on my Raptor and loved them. Does Fox hold the same reputation in the MTB world?

  8. #8
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    Do you have local shops? Look around and see if you can find any 2009 or earlier bikes (including demo bikes) on closeout. That's the best kind of starter bike IMO. You'll have a warranty, and a shop willing to help you out with maintenance and broken parts while you learn all the details on how to do stuff yourself. (Of course, its best to buy from a good shop that you find easy to deal with). Used bikes are also good. Just find someone you trust who knows a lot about bikes to help you so you don't buy junk.

    I think the ideal starter bike is a hardtail with solid frame, 100-140mm fork, and basic (but still good quality) components. A bike like that doesn't cost too much, and can easily be upgraded to fit a variety of roles down the line..

    Fox, Rockshox, Magura, and Marzocchi all make some suspension products that are great and others that aren't so good. It really depends on the year, model, and specific damper system. I think you'll find that most bikes with Fox forks are out of your price range though. Rockshox is by far the best for budget forks with their Tora 318 and Recon models.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by miniwisejosh
    Do you have local shops? Look around and see if you can find any 2009 or earlier bikes (including demo bikes) on closeout. That's the best kind of starter bike IMO. You'll have a warranty, and a shop willing to help you out with maintenance and broken parts while you learn all the details on how to do stuff yourself. (Of course, its best to buy from a good shop that you find easy to deal with). Used bikes are also good. Just find someone you trust who knows a lot about bikes to help you so you don't buy junk.

    I think the ideal starter bike is a hardtail with solid frame, 100-140mm fork, and basic (but still good quality) components. A bike like that doesn't cost too much, and can easily be upgraded to fit a variety of roles down the line..

    Fox, Rockshox, Magura, and Marzocchi all make some suspension products that are great and others that aren't so good. It really depends on the year, model, and specific damper system. I think you'll find that most bikes with Fox forks are out of your price range though. Rockshox is by far the best for budget forks with their Tora 318 and Recon models.
    I wish I had a local shop. The closest shop is 30 miles away. Thats why I figured I would ask here. I dont want to get burned. The shop I was planning to purchase from has a great reputation for customer service and "going the extra mile" from what people tell me. I am leaning towards the Specialized P.1 All Mountain Disc in the 21 inch size. Seems to be a good starting point. I can get one from that shop for 589 plus tax. I like the design and the parts it comes with seem to have decent reviews. All the bike shops near me are all stocking 2010 models now. My reason for leaning more towarsd new is the exact reason you stated...warranty and shop help/advice. Would I be making a bad choice?
    Last edited by 1bad99rt; 04-16-2010 at 09:41 PM.

  10. #10
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    That's a decent bike for the price, but I'd recommend getting something nicer if you can afford it. You'd be better off with a nice used bike in good condition. The fork on any bike with a new MSRP much under a grand will likely be inadequate for serious off road use. Anything made by RST, Suntour, or Spinner is not good. The Rockshox Dart isn't all that great either. The fork and overall geometry matter more than anything else in a hardtail IMO.

    Speaking of geometry, Are you sure you want XL? With your BMX background, you might find that a L frame works better for you. Try to get in some test rides on demo bikes to actually experience both sizes.

  11. #11
    bigger is better ...
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    At your height, get a 29er .....
    2010 XTC 29-1

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