1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Going for a ride......
    Reputation: energetix's Avatar
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    Steep Hills - Going Up

    Going down is one thing, and getting back up is another.

    On todays ride I decided to tackle some steep hills on the bike (both up and down) anyway the terrain is pretty rocky & loose at most and generally frequented by trail riders (motorbikes). Going up this one I lost momentum, didn't quite clip out in time so fell over. Then I fell over about two more times trying to get the bike going and get up the hill.

    For me and generally the newbies out there - is there a trick to getting back on the bike and getting going again on those steep uphills? Or is it generally better to walk it untill (or if) you get to a flatter section to get back on the bike?

    How steep is too steep ? Anyone of pics of you riding up some killer technical climbs?
    energetix



  2. #2
    Living to ride
    Reputation: Wherebob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by energetix
    Going down is one thing, and getting back up is another.


    How steep is too steep ?
    Depends on the rider. I have done some hills that if you not hanging over the front end your front wheel lifts off. If I'm on a steep one and go down I walk it to a flat section to get back on.
    Bob

    - '06 Cannondale F400
    - '89 Cannondale SM1000
    - '90 Diamond Back Ascent

  3. #3
    pronounced may-duh
    Reputation: Maida7's Avatar
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    depends on how steep. But the trick to getting back on and getting started is to keep all your weight over the front wheel but your body low to the bike.

    Climbing in general is a balancing act. To far back and you will lift the front wheel. Too far forward and you will spin the back wheel. I just inch forward a bit, arms bent, face over the handle bars, but don't stand all the way up. The use the strength in your upper body and arms to help anchor you body while you drive with your legs. When I was learning, I found it good to imagine that I was carrying something like a book tucked in my armpit and pined against my sides with my arms.

  4. #4
    Collector of Scars
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    I always find it helps to get as much momentum as possible before hitting the hill. Shift to a lower gear before you start to incline and if you have to, "zig-zag" from side to side on the trail on your way up. It's tough to do, no doubt, but it helps lessen the incline a few degrees. At least, that's what I've found. Someone else might have more helpful advice, so just keep at it. If you biff, walk that bad actor up and get back on.

    Ross
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    It definitely takes a little luck and a lot of power to get started again on a hill. Especially with clipless pedals. I would try to start by having my weak leg on the high pedal. Also, I would try shifting to a slightly higher gear. This way you have a little less torque on the back tire. Step up onto the pedal and push down. You have to get your foot on the other pedal quickly and hope you can either keep the momentum or get clipped in. Push hard. Hopefully you'll be able to clip in and then you can shift to a lower gear and keep going up the hill.

    Otherwise, you're going to have to walk to the top of the hill, or a flat part so you can start again. Starting going uphill is the worst.

    As to climbing, in general, I've found that bar ends help a lot. I know they're not very popular these days, but I like them. They get my weight a little more stretched out over the front of the bike while letting me keep my butt on the saddle. I will sometimes inch forward on the saddle on really tough climbs to maximize my pushing power. Also, I found that my stem was tilted a few degrees up. I flipped it over (well, a friend did) and found climbing was easier because the front wheel didn't lift as much. Keep your pedaling smooth and even, if you can, to keep from spinning the back wheel.

  6. #6
    Domestic Fowl
    Reputation: FreeRangeChicken's Avatar
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    Tips for getting re-started on an incline:

    1) Often it helps if you don't try to clip in immediatly... or at least don't worry about it if you don't clip in immediately. Just get your foot on the pedal and get a few revolutions in to get your balance and momentum going. Once you've gotten going and feel balanced you can take quick moment to get clipped in, or if it's working ride it out until you have a more opportune moment to work on clipping in.

    2) If the trail is wide enough you can try starting cross-slope(or slightly so) rather than directly up-slope.

    3) Start with your pedal foot just forward of the top of the pedal stroke. Push off with the with your grounded foot while pushing down on the pedal foot. As someone else said here, be mindful of your gearing. If you're in too low of a gear you'll spin out, too high and you won't have enough strength.


    Some techy climb pics:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by FreeRangeChicken; 05-18-2006 at 12:28 PM.

  7. #7
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    Shuttle up, it's all about decending.

  8. #8
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    Negative! It's all about the flow baby!

    Spin to the top, then breeze on down! Ohhhhhh yeaaahhhhh!

    Ross
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

  9. #9
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    This is what i use!!
    Attached Images Attached Images

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