1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Specs?

  1. #1
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    Specs?

    Ive had my Mongoose STAT 29er for a few months now and I would like to upgrade some stuff. Problem is I cant seem to find specs on the components on the bike, that way I know what to look for. Right now I would like a new cassette with lower and higher gears than my current one. Also I would like to change my front sprockets to a single sprocket since I never use the two larger ones. I have found some on ebay but I was unsure if they would fit or not. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the site.
    -To remove the cassette you're better off using and might have to use a removal tool. Got one? Maybe head down to lbs to have them remove it and see what they have to replace it. They may have a take off cheap.
    -The chainrings on the crankset have allen bolts that hold them on. Some cheaper cranksets do not have removable rings. Again you will need a crankset puller, got one? Guess you could remove the chainrings with the crankset still on the bb but? To find your bcd (bolt circle diameter) is pretty easy. Just measure from one allen bolt center to the next on the chainrings.
    -You might wanna check out Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information for a world of free info.
    I know it may seem like you're saving money by upgrading that bike but in the long run you're definitely not. IMO ride that thing to the ground and don't spend a dime on it, while you look for a much better used bike.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  3. #3
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    This is a walgoose so it has the cheaper components on it lol. The front sprockets are riveted together, I only use the smallest one (24 tooth) I would like to go with a single somewhere around 28 tooth maybe. For the rear I currently have 14x28, I found a 11x32 on ebay Im just not sure if it fits or not. No I don't have any removal tools, its something I need to invest in though since the closest bikeshop is an hour away so Ill be doing the work myself. Thanks for the input.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by p00ch View Post
    This is a walgoose so it has the cheaper components on it lol. The front sprockets are riveted together, I only use the smallest one (24 tooth) I would like to go with a single somewhere around 28 tooth maybe. For the rear I currently have 14x28, I found a 11x32 on ebay Im just not sure if it fits or not. No I don't have any removal tools, its something I need to invest in though since the closest bikeshop is an hour away so Ill be doing the work myself. Thanks for the input.
    Unless you never get above 7mph you are likely cross chaining like made with only using the granny ring. Why Avoid Cross Chaining Gears On Your Bike. I would start to us the resources you already have before buying any upgrades.

  5. #5
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    Good point Face, I'm on my middle ring 95% of the time. With the cassette it's more than I need. Don't get why more mtbs don't come with single ring cranksets, especially now with 10 gears out back.
    "Tortured by mental illness" ~monogod

  6. #6
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    I would just leave the front rings alone. If you never use the middle ring, then that means you are probably cross-chaining in the small ring, and should be using the middle ring.

    I think you will most likely need a new crank. The last time I tried to change the rings on a crank with the rings all riveted together, there was no single ring option to use.

    If you go with a single ring, you will need to use some method of chain retention to keep the chain from dropping off in the rough. The cheapest option (BBG bash guard + Ngear Jumpstop) will run about $35 with shipping. Also, if you do luck out and have a crank that can take a single chainring, you might have a hard time finding a cheap (or any) bash guard for the bolt pattern you have.

    I would think long and hard before putting any money into this bike. By the time you upgrade 2 or 3 things you could have had a better bike.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  7. #7
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    If you like this bike, I say just enjoy what you have and leave it alone.

    Looking at the specs for that bike, it says it's 21 speeds. So that means it's a 3x7, correct? 7 cogs in the back means it's probably* a freewheel hub and not a cassette, which means you can't just slap on some cassette you picked up elsewhere. At a minumum you'll need a new hub to lace up into the wheel. The cassette you're looking at is a 9 or 10 speed, which uses a narrower chain than the one you have now, which also means new chainrings, but since they're riveted that also means new cranks and (maybe) bottom bracket. The shifter and rear derailleur would also have to be upgraded to match the number of cogs. At this point, you're looking at spending more than what you paid for the bike, maybe as much as 2 or 3 times more. At that budget, you could buy a bike that's much better to begin with, either on the used market or one of the budget options from the LBS or bikesdirect.

    So, if you keep this bike, use it to learn how to better utilize your available gear ratios. As others have said, you should be on the middle ring the vast majority of the time. The small ring (often called the "granny gear") is normally only used as a bailout gear with the 2 or 3 largest rear cogs. It will help you get up, say, a steep incline. As you become stronger, you'll find you use this gear less and less. The big ring is normally only used with the smallest rear cogs, and is used on downhills or pavement where you would be spinning out in the middle ring.

    It does not make sense financially to upgrade this bike. Maybe fix things that break, but even then the bike should be considered disposable because you will quickly reach a point where the repairs will cost more than you paid for the bike.

    *7-speed cassettes do exist, but dept. store bikes normally come with a freewheel.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the input everyone, it's been helpful. I'll probably leave it alone then.

  9. #9
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    Well, now that I think about it, you may be able to find something with a little more range if you search for 7-speed freewheels. They run something like $20-30, and you probably won't have to change anything else. You'll also need a tool to get the old freewheel off, which kind of looks like a socket with splines on the outside, and would be under $10, or you could just bring the wheel to a bike shop and have them spin it off for you.

    Now it's not going to be a dramatic difference in gearing range, unless you get something like the Shimano Mega Range, which gives you one super low gear and six more conventionally-spaced ratios (thinking about getting one of these for my daughter's bike, FWIW). Try riding around using the tips in this thread about using all three chainrings and see how you do first.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

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