1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Specialized saddle angle adjust?

    Hello every1 I'm new to biking, bought my 1st real bike this summer. Specialized 2013 Camber 29, I love it! Only one problem, I cant use the specialized saddle. I'm 5'4" w/ a 29in inseam. As of now I've been using a Schwinn Pillow Top cruiser saddle. I would use the Specialized saddle, but it is too long. Schwinn saddle is 8.5in long and the specialized is 11in. So if I fall forward I rack myself up. I think I found the angle adjust, but it only goes down about 5 degrees or so, not allowing me to really dip the nose. So my question is, does a cruiser saddle on a trail bike hinder my technique?

  2. #2
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    It's personal preference, but I'm inclined to believe that lowering the front too much hurts technique.

  3. #3
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    Re: Specialized saddle angle adjust?

    The problem, IMHO, with the cruiser saddle is it doesn't allow you to scoot forward and back (especially back) as well as a "real" MTB saddle. You need to be able to shift your weight back for descents, and forward for climbs - the steeper and more technical, the more you move. That is why the original saddle had a much longer nose and likely was narrower at its widest point.
    Why exactly can't you use the stock saddle? If padding is an issue, are you using padded cycling shorts? (If not, start there).

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk 2

  4. #4
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    I'm using basketball shorts and such. And I can shift back and forth for descents. Climbs I'm having difficulty with, mainly gearing and because I'm a smoker. I don't like the stock saddle because it is longer. If I slip forward on it I hit my ***** on the nose of the saddle. As u can see from the pic I'm using flatbed pedals, so sometimes my feet slip and I fall forward

  5. #5
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    Specialized saddle angle adjust?

    the "recreational" saddle that you put on the bike will enable you to ride the bike without padded cycling shorts, but, you will not be able to maneuver the bike to get the best handling out of it. It will be too wide and limit how much you can move the bike

    put the original saddle back on, wear padded cycling shorts, buy a good pair of mountain bike shoes that are made for flat pedals (fiveten freeriders)

    I am assuming that you want to ride trails. if you just want to sit back and coast along a paved bike path, keep the recreational saddle on.

  6. #6
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    Ok I'll check out some padded shorts. And I am doing trails. I live in NY and I've been doing Rochester and Buffalo trails this summer. I wear Pumas for shoes

  7. #7
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    Specialized saddle angle adjust?

    I was amazed at the difference between regular "running" shoes and mountain bike specific "flat" shoes (one example, FiveTen FreeRiders, IMO the best). WAY, WAY more grip and I have never had or felt like I have been close to slipping off of the pedals.

  8. #8
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    I ended up finding this tonight. The Nishiki Adult Sport Bike Seat
    http://dsp.imageg.net/graphics/produ...9662460reg.jpg

    Same length/width of the specialized, but w/ a bit more padding. Went on the road a bit and it felt pretty good. I will give a full report after I hit the trails

  9. #9
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    Some shops have a saddle fit pad. You sit on it ,you leave a impression ,they take a measurement ,tell you what saddle would work for you. They might also have a demo program to try out different saddles. You don't want the saddle tilted too far foward ,you wiil be slipping off and useing your arms too much to hold yourself back.

  10. #10
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    This thread is making my head hurt a little bit. A while ago, a Systems engineer described his job to me as trying to figure out, based on the solution a client was describing, what it was that the client was actually trying to do.

    OP, what are you trying to do? It sounds like the real problem here is that you've been sliding off your pedals and whacking yourself on the saddle.

    My phone doesn't feel like downloading pics right now... what kind of pedals are you using? What kind of shoes? Someone else has already alluded to that. But I think before you throw money at yet another saddle or some different shorts or something, you should get your shoes and pedals sorted out.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
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    Specialized stock pedals, Puma shoes. My original question was, would a cruiser saddle hurt technique at all.

  12. #12
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    I understand that that was your original question. In answer to that, I think, yes. Part of MTB technique is getting behind the saddle. Any wider than necessary is counterproductive.

    Is Specialized putting an alloy pedal with little nubs on new bikes lately, or is it some plastic things?

    Your shoes probably aren't helping. Flat pedal fans seem to like either skate shoes or 5.10 MTB shoes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
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    Alloys w/ the nubs, not adjustable ones though. I have a pair of skate shoes, I guess I'll try those on my next ride Unless it starts snowing in NY lol.

    Why I didn't like the specialized saddle was, it just didn't feel right. It put too much pressure on the sensitive areas. I had to drop it a lot in order for it to be comfortable. At that point I was using my knees to pedal, which was bad as well.

  14. #14
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    The shop where you bought the bike might do a trade if the saddle doesn't look worn.

  15. #15
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    Setting up a saddle well is counterintuitive and surprisingly tricky. I meant to post this link this morning.
    http://sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Get other pedals and most of your troubles will be over, the OEM pedals suck. Get ones with pins and some skate shoes until you can get the 5.10's.

  17. #17
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    The stock pedals that come on camber are actually not that bad at all for stock pedels, until the aluminum pins wear down. I was at the LBS looking for flats to replace the stock plastic pedals that came on my Rockhopper, they took the aluminum pedels off a camber and sold them to me for $20. They are kinda big though

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