1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Which SPD pedals?

    Hi guys, I just placed an order for my new 29er and I want a new set of pedals to go with it! I've been using SPD and I'm quite happy with that style. The pedals I've been using will no longer work because they are simply clips and no flats for use with normal shoes. My wife and I have been Geocaching when not riding seriously and I need to wear regular shoes for it. I need a SPD style pedal that is two sided and also has a flats platform for use with either SPD shoes or regular shoes. I'd like to stay somewhat light, but not spend hundreds of dollars. Any recommendations?
    -Chris

  2. #2
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    spend as much as you feel comfortable with for shimano pedals. cant go wrong that way.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    x2 to what Joe_bloe says. I just got a set of M-324s from REI as my first set of clipless, and while I almost never use the platform side, it's been nice to have a couple times when I just want a quick hop on & hop off trip or find myself starting out in the middle of a nasty hill & unable to get the 2nd foot clipped because I'm such a noob.

  5. #5
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    Those are actually the exact pedals I have except they have the flats added. I stay clipped in 95% of the time and like the idea of having a double sided clip. Has anyone used:

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ss+Pedals.aspx ?

    By looking at them it appears the flat portion may be too far below the clip to actually press against my foot.
    -Chris

  6. #6
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    From what I can tell, those don't work too well as flats. You could get by in a pinch, but it wouldn't be too comfortable, and your foot might slip off if you have to really mash.

  7. #7
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    What about something like this, where the SPD pedals have a clip-in platform on one side:

    http://compare.ebay.com/like/2707549...=sbar&_lwgsi=y

  8. #8
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    If it were me...

    Given the circumstances, I'd change my shoes vs. changing the pedals. Get a pair of SPD compatible shoes that have a soft sole for hiking, etc.

    You can keep your existing pedals and shoes for mountain biking and use the soft soled shoes for geocaching.

    My experience with one-sided SPD's is that they're a pain in the arse when you're riding clipped in. the clip side of the pedal is heavier and rotates so it's facing the ground. Every single time you unclip and clip back in, you'll have to rotate the pedal with your foot to attach to the pedal.

    That may not seem like a big deal but I found it to be really annoying, especially if you're anywhere other than flat, level ground.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  9. #9
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    ^ agree. One sided gets really annoying.

    I have a pair of DX pedals which work great when clipped in.

    Shimano DX M647

    Of course, it doesn't work as great as regular platforms when not clipped in but works fine for a ride around the neighborhood or to the shops.

  10. #10
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    I have a pair of the Shimano PD-M324's in my Amazon cart . . . thought I'd finally decided until I read Ken's post. I was thinking, aside from being able to easily jump on the bike for neighborhood ride, the double sided would be better for technical bits where I don't want to be clipped in, but from what most of you are saying, you don't clip out often enough to make it worth it?

  11. #11
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    Something like this is more of a matter of what options are available to you, I think.

    For most who's been riding for more than a couple of years realize that it makes more sense to have 2+ different bikes for different purposes rather that trying to fit multi-purpose parts on a single bike.

    BUT, for some of us who doesn't have the luxury of owning multiple bikes...we just have to go against the recommendations and purchase parts that fits our purposes.

    I highly recommend against the M324 because of the annoyances mentioned by Ken, but there isn't really any other pedal out there that can provide you with better options.

  12. #12
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    Another option (and the one that I prefer) is to own two sets of pedals: one nice pair of SPD pedals, and a pair flat pedals. Swapping between the two takes takes less than 5 minutes, and one wrench or allen key (depending on the pedal).

    I much prefer SPDs for general riding (including rides where I'll be hiking some). But for riding around town where I'll be going in and out of stores, flat pedals work better for me. I often ride my SPDs with "regular" shoes and they work fine, but if it's an extended trip I'll thrown on a set of flat pedals that I keep as spares.
    Each bicycle owned exponentially increases the probability that none is working correctly.

  13. #13
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    I've been road riding for years, and have Speedplay Zeroes on my road bike. I have another road bike kicking around, a Cannondale that I've had for 20+ years that I can't bear to part with, that I've used as my kick around bike, but now that I'm entering the MTB world and am getting a 3rd!, I was hoping to thin the stable and put away the Cannondale (yup, put away, not get rid of), if dual sided pedals were worth it, but it's sounding like I won't be happy with them. I guess I just need to add on to the garage.

  14. #14
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    ^ yeah. Don't put that bike away. It's always better to have several bikes, each dedicated to specific purposes rather than to have one bike to (unsuccessfully) do all .

  15. #15
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    <<<<<< Too lazy to be switching pedals.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by laffeaux View Post
    Another option (and the one that I prefer) is to own two sets of pedals: one nice pair of SPD pedals, and a pair flat pedals. Swapping between the two takes takes less than 5 minutes, and one wrench or allen key (depending on the pedal).

    I much prefer SPDs for general riding (including rides where I'll be hiking some). But for riding around town where I'll be going in and out of stores, flat pedals work better for me. I often ride my SPDs with "regular" shoes and they work fine, but if it's an extended trip I'll thrown on a set of flat pedals that I keep as spares.
    I like the 2 pedals idea a lot as I do it myself It's very simple really as I hand tightened the pedal so a quick turn of 6 or 8mm (depending on the pedal) hex take off the pedals.

    If you are going with the platform clipless route I'd go with M647 why bother with half solution pedal

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