1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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  1. #1
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    Slipping derailuer

    I just had my derailuer adjusted over the past week and went out for a little ride this morning on the road. When I started from a stoplight I pulled up on the pedal and the RD started to slip again. Are you not suppose to pull up when pedaling? What else could be the cause?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Were you pedaling forwards or backwards?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    CSC
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    what do you mean by "slipped"? Is it just clunking hard back into gear? Is it changing gears? Clicking in between them? As AndrwSwitch asked, if you were pedaling backwards, that can mess up the timing between your chain and cogs, which will lead to the "clunk" back into gear when you pressure your pedals.

  4. #4
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    I was pedaling foward and maybe it's not the derailuer but as I pedal the chain will slip.

  5. #5
    CSC
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    Quote Originally Posted by crash926 View Post
    I was pedaling foward and maybe it's not the derailuer but as I pedal the chain will slip.
    While theoretically possible, I would be impressed/surprised if you could get the chain to hop out of the gears (from worn out gearing)...most likely a timing issue Did you rotate the cranks/pedals backwards at all before pedaling forwards? even if it was a seemingly insignificant amount, it can compound a gear/chain mesh timing issue that could be caused by a finicky derailleur adjustment.

    Derailleur adjusting is a bit of an art, and if the shop guy is not well-practiced, "close enough" may be your issue, i.e, it seemed good to him/her at the LBS, but under strain/ "real world" conditions, it's still out of whack. This could especially be the case if they are blowing you off as an "uninformed, overreacting noob"...not that I'm calling you one, but it happens.

    Take it to another bike shop if you can, to get a second mechanic working on it. Tell them what your issue is, what you experience, and what work you just had done to the bike...if they are decent guys, they won't charge you much for the work.

    Good luck!

    EDIT: I assume the "slip" is accompanied by a loud "bang" as the chain re-seats itself, correct? Possibly accompanied by you almost eating your handlebars?

  6. #6
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    Turn the barrel adjuster nut where the cable enters at the rear derailleur a couple clicks(1/4 turns) and try pedalling repeat until it stops or changes to another cog.. Turn it the other way if necessary. If you do not get smooth shifting through the cassette the derailleur hanger may be slightly bent. It is pretty common. You can bend it a little yourself with practice.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Chain slip isn't terribly uncommon with a worn out drivetrain. The cables on a bike are also sensitive enough that they sometimes work a little differently when someone's on the bike than when it's on a work stand. So see if you can get the rear derailleur guiding the chain better. Here's a link.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Rear Derailler Adjustments (derailleur)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    CSC, you are right there is a bang when it reseats itself, fortunately I didn't eat the handlebars. I probably pedaled backwards a little bit to get clipped in. There are a few good bike shops in town, I'll try turning the barrel nut a little bit and if that doesn't work stop by the other shop

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