1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
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    Single tracks condition question

    I'm pretty new to the single track riding so this question my be valid or it may just be I'm not a good enough rider yet. I went ride at a park local to me. the Single tracks were made be locals and are as best I can tell unmaintained. My question is I got on some trails where the vast majority of the track were exposed roots(the trail was more root than dirt). to me this was unrideable for the most part and I figure even if I was an advanced rider it wouldn't be much fun to ride on anyway.

    by my description is this a) an advanced(more the me at least trail) or b) an eroded trail that needs either major repair or to be closed to stop errosion?

    PS: any spelling errors. I already know my spelling sucks sorry

  2. #2
    Hi!!!
    Reputation: BelaySlave's Avatar
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    Where do you ride? Have you checked into the regional forums for where you live and posed this question? It could be a number of things....the rooty trail was intentional, erosion, neglect, yadda yadda yadda. Alot of riders love to ride more technical trails like what you just described.
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  3. #3
    Bike to the Bone...
    Reputation: rzozaya1969's Avatar
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    Hi Resnick

    Probably those sections require a little more experience to clear them, so probably you will be able to ride them in a while. I noticed the same thing when I started. I saw some trails where I doubted a bike would even fit, but then I saw some riders clear that section, or rocks, or whatever.

  4. #4
    Your bike is incorrigible
    Reputation: Guyechka's Avatar
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    Well, I am glad to see a beginner interested in trail conditions. Too many people just assume that, since there is a trail, it must be ok to ride on it. Sometimes trails are not maintained or are maintained so infrequently that they do become eroded and even unrideable. And let's not forget the cardinal rule: you shouldn't be riding on trails when they are muddy! Ok, having said that, there are a lot of trails that are so technical, so root infested or rocky that it takes a lot of skill and (mainly) determination to get over them. As your skill level improves, you'll suddenly start to see these trails in a whole new light.

  5. #5
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    At most time it would be good to ride with somebody better than you. It is a watch and learn stuff for MTBiking. The roots/rocks do look intimidating specially if it is still moist. Soon you'll be breezing through the roots, then comes the log(s) etc. Learn from others mistakes and make less mistakes, sometimes mistakes in this sport can be disastrous.

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Here's a link to some "Enduro" racing pictures from a piece of trail that I have never cleared completely (they are not my photos, I just know the place).
    http://asko7.softavenue.fi/kuvagalle...io.asp?HID=962

    The first 24 pictures, or so, show the rocky section where I always seem to run out of options on my hardtail. Guys with some more experience do not seem to have my difficulties there...

  7. #7
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    No one bothered to ask what the bike setup is and that can make quite a difference in the ride quality. I tried to find the Avenger on the Raleigh site, but it didn't list it. This leads me to believe that it might not be meant for trails as rugged as the rooty one you refer to although a good experienced trail rider can ride just about anything. Roots are a pain to most riders because they sap the energy quickly, but a bike with good suspension can negate quite a bit of those tiring bumps especailly if they go on and on. A bike with inexpensive shocks can sap the energy faster than a bike with no shocks as they won't be able to rebound quickly or absorb the bumps properly to help lessen the effects of the roots.

    As for your bad spelling...that's just lazy.

  8. #8
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    A yeah maybe it is just being lazy ... u could b rite. <<< thats lazy at least I try.

    Anyway, my bike could be the issue partially it's nothing special and the reason you couldn't find it is because it on the Canadian site, I have both the avenger and the chill models.

    I'm going to try the trail again tomorrow and I'll try to remember to snap a few pictures, that'll tell the story better.

  9. #9
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    Reputation: Tarekith's Avatar
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    I hear you though, sometimes just cause you CAN ride something doesn't make it fun. We have some trails near me that have just way too many fallen logs and log crossing to be fun for me. I like the practice and what not, but when you have to do it every 50-100 feet, it ruins the flow when you just want to ride some smooth single track.
    Tarekith.com

    '12 RM Slayer70, i9 Torch, Flow EX, XT Brakes, 5050 s3.

  10. #10
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    Roots can be a bit tough but really gets me is pine straw in a curve. A sharp turn with pine straw will put me down every now and then.

  11. #11
    Collector of Scars
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    Loose "sink-hole" sand is my nemesis. Try to power through and end up doing an endo. It only seems to happen on one trail in one park, but it gets me every time. Think I'd learn, wouldn't ya?

    It might be that the trail is eroded, or it might be that it's too advanced for you, or any combination thereof, or even of other factors. I'd check out the local forum and ask there, and see if you have a state mountain biking association (like the Michigan Mountain Biking Association here). Check with them, as they should know more about rating the trails, how often or if they're maintained, etc.

    For now? Find a different trail that's more to your skill level and/or liking. Like Tarekith was saying, not every trail is gonna be right for every rider. If you're not partial to roots, look into something more twisting or with small rocks or whatever, but sample as many different places as you can. If nothing else, that's the only way to improve your skillset.

    Ross
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

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