1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Silicone saddle pad

    So I got this silicone gel saddle pad, because of my sore n00b butt, and my manparts hurting terribly! Anyone else use this sort of thing?

  2. #2
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    Get rid of it as soon as possible. If your man-parts are hurting, the shape/width is wrong and it can't be corrected with padding. Your sit bones will go thru soft padding and the pressure still remains on soft tissue, effectively cutting circulation. It feels good when you try it at a shop and for 15 minutes of riding, but makes you numb and causes damage in the long run.

    A bit of padding for comfort isn't bad, but it's not a solution to aching or numb man-parts.

    The best thing you can do is have the spacing of your sit bones measured and get a saddle of suitable width. A recess or cut-out in the middle is good as well.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Get rid of it as soon as possible. If your man-parts are hurting, the shape/width is wrong and it can't be corrected with padding. Your sit bones will go thru soft padding and the pressure still remains on soft tissue, effectively cutting circulation. It feels good when you try it at a shop and for 15 minutes of riding, but makes you numb and causes damage in the long run.

    A bit of padding for comfort isn't bad, but it's not a solution to aching or numb man-parts.

    The best thing you can do is have the spacing of your sit bones measured and get a saddle of suitable width. A recess or cut-out in the middle is good as well.
    Ah I see. So, there is a local, very great, professional bike shop here in my town. So, although my Chinese is not great, what should I tell him in regard to what type of saddle I am looking for? Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Unfortunately saddle choice is among the biggest pains of the process - no pun intended. We can't tell you what to look for specifically (aside from the "man grooves" Saul mentioned), and if you're like me it will take several before you find your ideal saddle.

    Some tips and complications to be aware of:
    -Get a pair of cycling shorts with a chamois.
    -As Saul suggested, sitting on a saddle in-store will tell you nothing. Even a short ride isn't enough.
    -You could have the perfect saddle, but it is set too high/low/forward/backward or the angle is wrong. The saddle install on the bike also affects your comfort greatly.

    I have a basement full of saddles that I dislike, unfortunately.

    Best tip of all? When you finally find a saddle you like, buy 2. If/when they stop making them you'll want a spare.

    Oh, and sorry - I don't speak Chinese either.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    Unfortunately saddle choice is among the biggest pains of the process - no pun intended. We can't tell you what to look for specifically, and if you're like me it will take several before you find your ideal saddle.

    Some tips and complications to be aware of:
    -Get a pair of cycling shorts with a chamois
    -As Saul suggested, sitting on a saddle in-store will tell you nothing. Even a short ride isn't enough
    -You could have the perfect saddle, but it is set to high/low/forward/backward or the angle is wrong. The saddle install on the bike also affects your comfort greatly.

    I have a basement full of saddles that I dislike, unfortunately.

    Best tip of all? When you finally find a saddle you like, buy 2. If/when they stop making them you'll want a spare.

    Oh, and sorry - can't help you with the Chinese bit.
    Ok thanks! I guess I will just try a few,

  6. #6
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    My $.02 here...
    Try a saddle that looks like this: WTB Pure V Race Saddle at Price Point
    I went from an oem saddle to this one and it really made a difference in the comfort. The relief channel and the "whale tail" allow you to maneuver your sit area depending on the terrain you're on. Also keep in mind that saddles come in varying widths usually ranging from 130mm to 155mm so you may need a wider saddle too.

  7. #7
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    I recently switched from a Rocket V to a Pure V and it was like an awakening. The Rocket V wasn't awful, but the Pure is so much better for bigger guys.
    I like turtles

  8. #8
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    Do measure the sit bone spacing though. I'm a skinny guy, 189 cm tall and weigh 71-72 kg (6'4" / 165 lbs), but the right size for me from Specialized is their widest 155 mm range. I'm riding a Romin now and while it's a pretty hard saddle, it's been really comfortable after my buttocks got used to it.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Get rid of it as soon as possible. If your man-parts are hurting, the shape/width is wrong and it can't be corrected with padding. Your sit bones will go thru soft padding and the pressure still remains on soft tissue, effectively cutting circulation. It feels good when you try it at a shop and for 15 minutes of riding, but makes you numb and causes damage in the long run.

    A bit of padding for comfort isn't bad, but it's not a solution to aching or numb man-parts.

    The best thing you can do is have the spacing of your sit bones measured and get a saddle of suitable width. A recess or cut-out in the middle is good as well.
    ^^^This

    Ride more, you'd feel better soon. The more you ride the worse gel saddle would feel. Not to mention the extra chafing bonus gel saddle gives you

  10. #10
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    A comfy looking seat probably hurts after a few miles.. A seat that looks uncomfortable may be the best one for you if it fits your sit bones as others have mentioned. My a$s hurt a little bit when I got my new bike this summer but after a couple rides I was good to go and the saddle is perfect for me.
    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    You see, I don't have a single brand name in my signature because I know most bike brands and component brands 99%.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCtrailMonkey View Post
    A comfy looking seat probably hurts after a few miles.. A seat that looks uncomfortable may be the best one for you if it fits your sit bones as others have mentioned. My a$s hurt a little bit when I got my new bike this summer but after a couple rides I was good to go and the saddle is perfect for me.
    That's a great point that I forgot to mention. Sometimes a saddle that hurts the first time ultimately works well for you longer term.

    I tried a hard, carbon-only saddle (no padding at all) and at first I thought my butt would be in pain the entire time. Now I'm fine with it. (Although wouldn't attempt an endurance event with it.)

  12. #12
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Don't spend any money yet.

    If the saddle hurts your sit bones, you just have to harden up. Literally. People report that it takes a couple weeks. I don't really remember.

    Throw out the gel pad. The problem with soft saddles is that they squish their way "up in there" and hurt one's man parts. Lame. It's all about a firm saddle with the right shell shape for you. Not necessarily me or someone else - you.

    It's true that not every saddle works for every rider. You've just succeeded in opening the useless recommendations flood gates. Sorry everybody. But there should be a Bad MTB Advice Cat about saddles.

    So to start over - where are you feeling the pressure? Without gel pads, hemorrhoid pillows (supposedly also counterproductive) etc?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  13. #13
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    I have brought a few people into cycling and every time it is the same experience. "Saddle Sore". You truly do have to (like the post above says) "Harden-up".

    In my experience, it takes about 100 mile to become accustom to any saddle. If you have not found the sweet spot after that, it is over. Most LBS will let you try a saddle and exchange until you find the right one (as long as you don't kill the rails or ding it up). You will start with the $30 saddles and before you are done, likely be in the $120 range. You truly get what you pay for in a saddle if you do any kind of time in the saddle.

  14. #14
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    Those things are absolute garbage. They do more harm than good. Find a local bike shop that will let you "demo" a saddle or has a generous return policy.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 12-25-2012 at 07:58 AM.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Don't spend any money yet.

    If the saddle hurts your sit bones, you just have to harden up. Literally. People report that it takes a couple weeks. I don't really remember.

    Throw out the gel pad. The problem with soft saddles is that they squish their way "up in there" and hurt one's man parts. Lame. It's all about a firm saddle with the right shell shape for you. Not necessarily me or someone else - you.

    It's true that not every saddle works for every rider. You've just succeeded in opening the useless recommendations flood gates. Sorry everybody. But there should be a Bad MTB Advice Cat about saddles.

    So to start over - where are you feeling the pressure? Without gel pads, hemorrhoid pillows (supposedly also counterproductive) etc?
    It cuts off the circulation to my testicles, so that when I stand up, they hurt terribly.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    It's true that not every saddle works for every rider. You've just succeeded in opening the useless recommendations flood gates. Sorry everybody. But there should be a Bad MTB Advice Cat about saddles.
    I'm biased (because I've posted in this thread), but I don't see any blatantly bad advice here. Sure, specific saddle recommendations are of little value 'cause everyone is different, but aside from that the advice has been pretty sound.

    Anything in particular that you disagree with? I'm open to criticism.


    P.S. Happy Holidays folks!

  17. #17
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    I've noticed with friends who complain about pain from the saddle that a many times they are to far forward or have the seat at an odd angle for their position (in one case, having the seat in a time trial slope but sitting upright). Before I bought anything I would move the seat back and forth during rides to see what is comfortable.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainmatt View Post
    ...because of my sore n00b butt, and my manparts hurting terribly! Anyone else use this sort of thing?
    Just to add to the good advice already given, if your saddle isn't level front to back, level it and start tweaking from there.

  19. #19
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I was disagreeing with the specific saddle advice and the lack of discussion of setup.

    OP, try playing with your saddle's fore-aft position and tilt. Start with level and experiment from there. If you can find a position that puts all your weight on your sit bones and doesn't make you slide around, you're good. With a new saddle, you need to be able to do this too.

    While I certainly have a preferred shell shape, with a little adjustment I can ride lots and lots of different models. Certainly borrowing friends' bikes when I travel is not a problem.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  20. #20
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    If it's the nuts, you may have them packed in the wrong area. Try to move them up, away from the saddle. Your undies should be sufficiently tight to allow this.

    Great points about saddle adjustment from others - I completely overlooked that. With good adjustments even a less than ideal saddle can be adequate, but with bad adjustments it doesn't matter how well the saddle might fit you, 'cause it won't.

  21. #21
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    +1 on the adjustment mentions above. I should have mentioned that I was adjusting my seat along the way until my saddle felt the best. My buddy bought one of those gel pads because his a$s hurt after only being back on his bike for 1 ride after a long time off, which is normal. Now his bits hurt him and I told him its the wallyword gel cover and that he needed to spend more time in the saddle before resorting to such a POS solution. It's like any other sport, when you aren't doing it often then the first few/several times back out will leave you extra sore.
    Quote Originally Posted by CannondaleF9 View Post
    You see, I don't have a single brand name in my signature because I know most bike brands and component brands 99%.

  22. #22
    gran jefe
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    a gel pad without a groove is a bad thing. a gel pad with a groove can be a pretty good thing.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saul Lumikko View Post
    Get rid of it as soon as possible. If your man-parts are hurting, the shape/width is wrong and it can't be corrected with padding. Your sit bones will go thru soft padding and the pressure still remains on soft tissue, effectively cutting circulation. It feels good when you try it at a shop and for 15 minutes of riding, but makes you numb and causes damage in the long run.

    A bit of padding for comfort isn't bad, but it's not a solution to aching or numb man-parts.

    The best thing you can do is have the spacing of your sit bones measured and get a saddle of suitable width. A recess or cut-out in the middle is good as well.
    This 2x's.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  24. #24
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    Dont risk your junk

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