1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Shrek sperm

  1. #1
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    Shrek sperm

    Guys, just don't slime your tubes. There's really no point. My LBS suggested that I use it to help mitigate flats with all the broken glass out on their local trail. It seemed odd that the best suggestion they would have was this crap. Oh well. I buy tubes in bulk anyway - at least for a little while longer. Its not really the weight its the balance issues. If you slime your tubes then spin your wheels, you'll notice how bad it is. It does even out after while, but it never really goes away completely. After the eight bucks on slime and whatever you pay for tubes (for me ~8.00 at the LBS or 3.50 online) it's a waste of money. I just fixed a flat on the trail out there today, and I decided to keep the tube to show how useless this stuff is. Tiny pinhole, and the slime didn't do a thing for me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Shrek sperm-1215121909.jpg  

    Shrek sperm-1215121911a.jpg  

    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  2. #2
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    Looks like slime evenly coats the inside of your tube it has to be better than stans

  3. #3
    'Tis but a scratch
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    The only time I had slime in my tubes was when my brother and I rented a couple MTBs out in the desert in Blue Diamnond, NV. This was a little excursion while on a Vegas trip. Between the 2 of us, we got 3 flats that day. Lot of good slime did for us.

  4. #4
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    any LBS that actually recommends using Slime products deserves a boycott.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    any LBS that actually recommends using Slime products deserves a boycott.
    ditto

  6. #6
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    I made the mistake of buying a slime tube. I had to carry pliers with me because the valve would freeze with slime and you couldn't open it without them.

    Never again.

  7. #7
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    Pin hole flat solution: Pre-glued patch kit and check the tire to see if whatever caused the flat is still there. Far cheaper than a new tube & takes about the same amount of time to do as to change a tube.

  8. #8
    Cormac
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    just go tubeless....?
    '11 Dawes Deadeye
    '12 Niner E.M.D. 9
    '09 Giant ocr c1
    Xtracycle

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cormy View Post
    just go tubeless....?
    Planning on it, but I want to wear down the tires I just bought a couple months ago before I spend $180.00 on a tubeless setup. I'm riding around town at night now to help speed that process along...then I need to get permission from the ol' ball and chain.
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  10. #10
    Ski N Bike Tech
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    any lbs that actually recommends using slime products deserves a boycott.
    +1.

  11. #11
    Afric Pepperbird
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    any LBS that actually recommends using Slime products deserves a boycott.
    Too true, too true!

  12. #12
    I4NI
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    Mine rec. tire liners


    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  13. #13
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    ive never used slime. However Ive never once had a single flat using liners.
    Just some yahoo on a Wahoo

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenCanoe View Post
    Planning on it, but I want to wear down the tires I just bought a couple months ago before I spend $180.00 on a tubeless setup. I'm riding around town at night now to help speed that process along...then I need to get permission from the ol' ball and chain.
    You don't need to spend that much to go tubeless and why don't you just do it with your current tires?

  15. #15
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    Im guessing ~60.00 for the Stans rim strip and sealant kit thingy, then new UST tires. The tires I have on there i wouldn't trust to even attempt a tubeless setup with. I grabbed some cheapo Duro tires in a pinch. I regret that decision...
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenCanoe View Post
    Im guessing ~60.00 for the Stans rim strip and sealant kit thingy, then new UST tires. The tires I have on there i wouldn't trust to even attempt a tubeless setup with. I grabbed some cheapo Duro tires in a pinch. I regret that decision...
    Don't need UST tires to run tubeless. As long as you're using sealant you can use [nearly] any tire. Look up "ghetto tubeless" which works great and costs as much as 2 24" tubes and a bottle of Stans.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  17. #17
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    I use to run the slime tubes and honestly they never gave me any issues. I ran a pair of tubes for a year and only once did one fail to to not seal. I do think they have their place and I do recommend them when people say they are going to give them a try. However, now that I have gone tubeless and have seen the benefits for myself I'll probably never go back.

    Sent using my fat thumbs!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Don't need UST tires to run tubeless. As long as you're using sealant you can use [nearly] any tire. Look up "ghetto tubeless" which works great and costs as much as 2 24" tubes and a bottle of Stans.
    ^^ This... and using a non-UST tire can save you around 1/2 lbs per tire.

    It's also very easy to seal up rims with Stan's yellow tape.

    -S

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Don't need UST tires to run tubeless. As long as you're using sealant you can use [nearly] any tire. Look up "ghetto tubeless" which works great and costs as much as 2 24" tubes and a bottle of Stans.
    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    ^^ This... and using a non-UST tire can save you around 1/2 lbs per tire.

    It's also very easy to seal up rims with Stan's yellow tape.

    -S
    Ive looked into several of the ghetto tubeless setups (gorilla tape, half of a stans kit, paper mache' and all kinds of other hilarious enterprises undertaken by individuals that can only be described as "mentally hilarious"), and the results have seemed to be optimistic at best. These setups are very highly dependent on the rim/tire/sealant/pressure choice - much more so than with a kit. Since I run Bontrager AT-850's, and Taiwanese frowny tires, I figured tubes were the best option while I save up. However, if you more experienced riders maintain that it's a viable option, I will likely look more into it, probably with some PMs and eventually a thread about my success or failure.
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  20. #20
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    Whats the point of going tubeless? Is there a benefit other than the weight saving of the tube?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by speadphreak View Post
    Whats the point of going tubeless? Is there a benefit other than the weight saving of the tube?
    Less punctures and even lower pressures,I want to go tubeless aswell but my dad says its a royal pain in the a*rse if you still puncture or if your swapping tires often.
    EDIT: 300th post, oh yeah!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by speadphreak View Post
    Whats the point of going tubeless? Is there a benefit other than the weight saving of the tube?
    Weight savings, low tire pressure which leads to better traction and fewer punctures, financial gains if you worry about a four dollar tube (or .50 cent patch), when you do get a puncture, the sealant in the tire does wonders to plug it (see below).



    Quote Originally Posted by Wasmachineman NL View Post
    .EDIT: 300th post, oh yeah!
    Congratulations, bud.

    EDIT: UST tires generally have a thicker more durable carcass helping their resistance to punctures. A couple other riders telling their favorite stories about their tire installation wile I was in the local shop one time, and I walked away with some useful information. While you are initially installing your tubeless tires, you have a pool of sealant in the bottom of the tire. Should the bead blow off or not seal properly, your sealant will more likely than not be blown all over the place when you go to air it up, and your normally lovely wife will shortly become a fire breathing dragon as soon as she sees it. I guess something to keep in mind.
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  23. #23
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    I've never used a ust tire and have been going tubeless for years now. They do have a thicker more durable carcass though. Regardless whether you go ust or not you're still going to need a tubeless rim or go stan's. My recommendation? Go stan's and use whatever freakin' rim and tire you want. BTW I have had the beads blow off twice, once blowing sealant all over the beach and once in my face when the bead snapped. Hilarious yes, very LOUD, and messy lol

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreenCanoe View Post
    EDIT: UST tires generally have a thicker more durable carcass helping their resistance to punctures. A couple other riders telling their favorite stories about their tire installation wile I was in the local shop one time, and I walked away with some useful information. While you are initially installing your tubeless tires, you have a pool of sealant in the bottom of the tire. Should the bead blow off or not seal properly, your sealant will more likely than not be blown all over the place when you go to air it up, and your normally lovely wife will shortly become a fire breathing dragon as soon as she sees it. I guess something to keep in mind.
    Ghetto tubeless works great, yellow Stan's tape works great if you can get the tire to seat (I have one tire that works and one that doesn't running non-UST tires), and UST tires with Stans rim strips work great. Sure it's dependent on how your tire and rim fit (tighter = better) but it's not a situation where you should say that UST is the only way to go.

    UST tires do not have "thicker more durable carcass" no matter how poor the grammar is there. UST tires have a [typically] butyl layer built into the casing for air retention (means you don't need sealant) and the bead is a locking type which creates an air tight seal. Actually, the seal is what defines a tire as UST, without that it's "tubeless ready" or one of the many variants.

    I still have a mental image of the results of a co-worker at our shop blowing a tubeless tire off the rim and leaving a shop manager shaped clean spot on the wall. He didn't find it as funny as the rest of us, but it took a long time for us to get our hearing back.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  25. #25
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    Gorilla tape here for almost two years.
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

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