1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    33

    Should I Buy an Old Dual Susp. or a New Hardtail?

    My budget is about $500-$600 max, so I could either afford a new entry level hardtail or a dual suspension from 2001 or earlier on craigslist. I don't know which would be better; how far behind are the old dual suspensions? If I bought an old bike I would probably upgrade the forks and add disc brakes. Is there anything I should look out for when buying a used bike besides the obvious? If I do buy used, what are some good old ds bikes?
    Thanks, Nick

  2. #2
    I4NI
    Reputation: S_Trek's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,234
    There's nothing like new but what kind of bike(s) are we talking about?
    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by S_Trek View Post
    There's nothing like new but what kind of bike are we talking about?
    Well for a new bike something like a gt avalanche disc 3.0, and for used a 1999 specialized stumpjumper fsr or similar bike. I'm not limited to those bikes; there are other options out there.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fireball_jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    301
    $600 max I'd go with the new hardtail. Used bikes aren't a bad deal if they're in decent shape, but if you have to start replacing forks or the drivetrain soon after buying it, it's probably not cost effective.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    33
    Quote Originally Posted by fireball_jones View Post
    $600 max I'd go with the new hardtail. Used bikes aren't a bad deal if they're in decent shape, but if you have to start replacing forks or the drivetrain soon after buying it, it's probably not cost effective.
    Well, the stumpjumper is in good shape, and it's $400, but no one really likes the rockshox judy forks.

  6. #6
    Professional Speed Bump
    Reputation: captainjoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    755
    If you can push your budget a bit...you can get something like this: http://losangeles.craigslist.org/lgb...519664581.html

    If it fits, of course. Looks like it's for someone 6 ft +.

  7. #7

  8. #8
    Professional Speed Bump
    Reputation: captainjoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    755
    Titus Racer-X: http://orangecounty.craigslist.org/bik/2530121107.html

    Looks like there's a few good full suspension bikes around your area...especially this one.

    If they fit...that is.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    17
    Go New hardtail. 12 year old components no matter what level are still 12 year old components. Suspension technology from that era are nowhere near where they are today. You will be frustrated with stuff constantly breaking or needing replaced on the used bike.

  10. #10
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    5,029
    Quote Originally Posted by CoffeeRoaster View Post
    Go New hardtail. 12 year old components no matter what level are still 12 year old components. Suspension technology from that era are nowhere near where they are today. You will be frustrated with stuff constantly breaking or needing replaced on the used bike.
    Agree, new or even a couple year old hardtail that's used would be better than buying an old FS bike. Pivots and links get old and start to cause headaches, I would just skip it and go hardtail.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    48
    Id suggest going new because of the benefits of having the LBS being there to help you out with any adjustments you may need for the new ride. Personally it seems like every time I go for a ride, I need to take it back to the shop for some type of minor tune up so I for me its a not even a question. good luck on your decision.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bigfruits's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    812
    id go used hardtail for best value.

  13. #13
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    11
    use hardtail if you are at that budget

Similar Threads

  1. Help choosing a Dual Susp Specialized please
    By Bushranger in forum Specialized
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-09-2009, 01:31 AM
  2. 2010 Dual Susp 29er Range Questions
    By Bushranger in forum Specialized
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 08-02-2009, 02:54 PM
  3. Best Dual Susp. for $1500
    By bryanpin in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 08-20-2007, 04:43 PM
  4. Opinion on entry-level Dual-Susp. Bikes
    By crthomps in forum Bike and Frame discussion
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-20-2006, 11:56 PM
  5. what is lightest 4" horst dual susp frame?
    By ccm in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 01-23-2004, 02:34 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •