1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Seat too wide?

  1. #1
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    Seat too wide?

    Hey guys,

    My new bike came with a seat that seems a bit wider than the one I was used to. Its a WTB something or another, perfect V maybe, anyhow. I never saw it to be a problem but i realized it yesterday riding on a pretty smooth singletrack with a lot of whoops. I can't seem to get my body far back enough. It seems as though the seat hits my inner thieghs and makes it hard to get back past a certain point. Is there any way around this other than a skinier seat?

  2. #2
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    I have had that problem b/c of my hugely massive muscular thighs.

    I just rode with the seat lower, which allowed for clearance.

    Then I bought a new seat. Specialized Avatar 130

  3. #3
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    I always drop it on the downhills. I mean its fine going up, but like I said hard to get my legs around it when getting back. I might go to the LBS and see what they have for seats.

  4. #4
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    We have so much up/down around here that I am pretty much forced to keep it in one spot. YOu can sacrifice a bit of ease by dropping the seat an inch - this will require building a bit more muscle, but let you move around more.
    Measure your current seat, or take it along (on th epost) to compare to what is available at the shop.

  5. #5
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    Try to learn how to move your gravity center(otherwise known as the Southern part of back) behind the saddle. That is, almost sitting on the rear wheel, with your chest touching the back of the seat. Of course, it is just as essential to learn how to move your weight back up and forward from behind the seat seamlessly. Once you have mastered the technique, there is no need to lower/lift the seat on the trail. Anyway, you can't do it every time a descent ends and ascent starts or vice versa.
    I have some experience, so I can do it even on my commuter bike(1 size larger than I, with my modest height, need), with its wide seat(WTB Speed V), wearing super baggy work pants. I mean, it is really easy, just takes some while to get used to. This technique is very helpful in many occasions on downhill sections.

  6. #6
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    It is all about having a seat you can get behind. No technique will change the fact that your legs will not move past the wide seat!

  7. #7
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    right, and thats my problem. Im not some kind of pro, but i feel that I have decent technique on the down hills. I lower the seat as a preference, i feel more in control of the bike with it lower. I rode a bike with a more narrow seat yesterday at the shop, but its hard to tell just riding around the parking lot if it makes any difference.

  8. #8
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    I'm having the exact same problem with my saddle. I had a Spec. Rival which was 130mm and it was just too narrow for my rear. Now I ride a Spec. BG2 sport which is 150mm and it's very comfortable. There is no pain or discomfort at all even after 2+ hours. However, when I'm doing some up and downs on some trails and singletracks where I need to move around the saddle, it's a bit too wide to get back quickly. I don't want to lose the comfort of the saddle but I'm starting to realize that I've got to get a 143mm to compromise. I figure that my thighs will never get smaller so I'll have to change my saddle. I like the fact that Specialized has different sizes to suit.

  9. #9
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    I think I will have to do the same thing.

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