1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Redcoat
    Reputation: Brockwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,008

    Scott Spark 2009 - Too old?

    So I want to buy a full suspension bike (first). I have been talking to someone regarding a scott spark 60 2009 and it looks as though I can procure it for around $600. The only thing that gets me is the age of the bike in terms of mechanics and how technology has progressed. Baring in mind that upon personal inspection of the bike all is in working order, would this be a good decision or should I go with something more modern but at the same time a lot more expensive. (price is a little bit of an issue.)

    I mostly XC but i do tackle trails with more technical challenges on a regular basis. I would prefer a 26er over 29er. (have tried both).

    Cheers for any comments in advance.

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,939
    I think the Spark was a reasonably well-regarded bike. I don't think the top end of technology has changed that much in the last four years. Certainly back in '03, I don't think FS was actually working well for XC yet. So it's really a matter of whether Scott had made the switch to the current generation of suspension designs by '09. Which, I think they had. Look around for some old reviews.

    Can you borrow the bike for a weekend or something? I'd had somewhat underwhelming test rides on FS bikes for years, but recently rode one I liked a lot better. Since it wasn't on-brand for my team, my next step was to borrow a demo bike that was and ride it for a week. My shop ended up making a sale and I ended up choosing the next size up from what looked good on paper, so I think it worked out well all around. Since not all FS bikes are the same, I also wasn't comfortable spending that much money without some saddle time.

    I suspect that the usual hour-ish demo isn't really fair to a lot of brands' FS bikes. They're more sensitive to setup than hardtails, IME. I feel like if the shock isn't right, it can really mess with climbing and drag descending performance down to much to make all the extra money, weight and mechanical complication seem worthwhile. Which would be a nice thing about borrowing for a weekend, although I feel like I've still gained some insight doing shorter demos when the mechanic with the tour could rough in the suspension for me first.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dietz31684's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    385
    I think you'd be fine with the bike. It's an entry level bike in terms of components but it'll do the job. I ride a 2005 bike with a few upgrades so I don't consider 2009 that old.

  4. #4
    Redcoat
    Reputation: Brockwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,008
    Thank you both for the input.

    I forgot the link apologies: 2009 Scott Spark 60 - BikePedia

    I have yet to read a bad review about it and upon searching the forum the Spark always seems to come up trumps no matter what the year.

    Testing is key and i should get to take it out on some trails that i usually ride. I guess at the end of the day if i like it that is all that matters. Im just cautious to what i might be missing out on with something newer.

    I was looking at the Jamis XTC Dakar comp 2012.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,146
    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    So I want to buy a full suspension bike (first). I have been talking to someone regarding a scott spark 60 2009 and it looks as though I can procure it for around $600. The only thing that gets me is the age of the bike in terms of mechanics and how technology has progressed. Baring in mind that upon personal inspection of the bike all is in working order, would this be a good decision or should I go with something more modern but at the same time a lot more expensive.
    2009 tool old? Ha never. I ride a 2003 hardtail 26er. The age of the bike is not relevant, but the condition of it is. A bike of that age could be worn out or it could have mostly sat in the garage for years. As for the newer stuff.. yes there is newer stuff, but it is only marginally better. A little bit here and a little bit there. If the bike is sounds it will be ok. Now I have to say I don't know much about the spark 60 model and how good it was when it was new, but don't worry about it being too old tech. That is silly especially when you have work on a budget.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dietz31684's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    Thank you both for the input.

    I forgot the link apologies: 2009 Scott Spark 60 - BikePedia

    I have yet to read a bad review about it and upon searching the forum the Spark always seems to come up trumps no matter what the year.

    Testing is key and i should get to take it out on some trails that i usually ride. I guess at the end of the day if i like it that is all that matters. Im just cautious to what i might be missing out on with something newer.

    I was looking at the Jamis XTC Dakar comp 2012.
    I just looked at the Jamis on Jenson's website vs the Scott. You will not be missing out on anything with that Scott other than the fact that Jamis is brand new. The specs on each are VERY simialar and they will both ride about the same. The Scott actually has 120/110 travel vs the 100/100mm on the Jamis. Both of them have coil forks so be aware that you may need to swap coils with either bike. The Jamis is set up with 10 speed but that's not worth $500. If you can pick it up Scott in good shape for $600 I'd go that route.

    This is assuming that you are positive the Scott is the right size, a test ride would go a long way unless you know exactly what you want.

  7. #7
    Redcoat
    Reputation: Brockwan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,008
    Another thing i liked about the scott is that it is very "upgradeable". I love working on bikes so this will also serve as a nice little long term project moving forward.

    Thanks again for the advice. If the bike fits well ill be going that route.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,939
    Nice. Pics if you get it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: moefosho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,862
    A newer better fork would make the scott feel like a new bike and ride much better.

Similar Threads

  1. Scott Spark 60 (2009) Help and advice for upgrading forks please
    By Drumminamigo in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-29-2013, 08:15 AM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-06-2013, 04:21 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-06-2013, 12:50 PM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-18-2011, 03:41 PM
  5. 2009 Scott Spark shock lockout
    By tosa in forum Scott Sports
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-28-2011, 08:32 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •