1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Scott Scale 630 - 26" - wheel upgrade?

    Hi, do you have any suggestions how to upgrade the stock syncros xr 2.5 wheels on my 26" scott scale?

    I was thinking about Mavic Crossmax SLR or ST wheels but is the upgrade worth considering? I think the syncros wheels are not that heavy although they are not super light, maybe there are some scott owners out there who had the same issue?

  2. #2
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    In most cases stock wheels are run of the mill, and even on more expensive bikes are the one thing that can be easily upgraded. The reason most companies put an "in house" brand wheel on their bikes is to keep the price point down. Obviously upgrading to a UST is a nice option to have being that the average 29er tube weighs about 7 oz. So removing tubes saves you nearly 1lb of rotating weight.

    My suggestion before you go out and spend $1000 on a wheelset... Strip your wheelset down and weigh them. Once you know what those weigh? You will then know what you're shopping for. Say your Syncros wheelset weighs 1800grams... It wouldn't make much sense to spend say $800 on a new set of wheels that weighs 1700grams. At that point you could just put a good tubeless conversion in your Syncros and enjoy what you got. Keep in mind 454grams = 1lb(I say 450 for math purposes)

  3. #3
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    I already weighed the rear wheel - 2207 grams including a RoRo perf. tire, tube, rotor and cassete. Without stripping the wheel I estimate the rear mass to amount to: 2207- 480-155-115-299=1158gr of the whell (rim+spokes+the thing in the center what do you call it and including the removable axle (QR?). 1158gr is not bad...

    And the front I think weighed around 1,6kg (I don't recall right now) making the front wheel without the rubbers weigh around 950grams.

  4. #4
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    I know it's a pain in the butt, but the only true way is to weigh them bare, because that's how everybody advertises weight. But, if your estimations are correct than your wheels weigh about 2000grams... So you have 2 options. Go tubeless conversion and save a little weight. Or buy a set of Crossmax ST's which are about 1600grams. That saves you almost 1lb right there. Then since they are UST, you save nearly another 1lb dropping the tubes. That would lower the weight of your bike nearly 2lbs and dramatically reduce your rotating mass. 2lb weight savings in your wheelset would be a huge difference.

  5. #5
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    UST saves 0,5 kg? what about the milk? I thought that TR tires are heavier in UST version and the milk is needed and more or less the weight is the same?
    Would it make sense to go for Mavic Crossmax SLR instead of ST?

  6. #6
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    UST tires are usually a little heavier. But you don't have to run UST tires either. You can run a standard tire and 2-3 oz. of Stan's or another favorite sealant just fine.

    The SLR's are 1440grams, and a bit more pricey... If spending the extra money makes sense to you, than I'd say go for it!

  7. #7
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    If you must upgrade, do it like you mean it. Mavic wheels have weird spokes, not enough of them, and their hubs don't have a great reputation.

    If I was to do a weight-trimming wheel build, I'd probably use DT 240 hubs, DT Alpine (IIRC, the lightest round ones anyway) spokes and carbon rims. I'd probably stick with 32 spokes in a 3-cross pattern - I think it's very strong and an individual spoke is very light, so it's a pretty forgiving way to build a wheel without adding much weight.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    Andrw is echoing my same feelings. Do a little research on wheels and figure out what fits your riding style. At 1500grams I would buy the Enve 26AM with DT240 hubs. $2400
    Bike Doctor



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