1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
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    Schwinn s40 upgrades?

    Are there any upgrades for this bike the brakes aren't working too well and is it possible to get a new shock for downhill riding and jumping?

  2. #2
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    Have you taken the bike to a shop to have the brakes adjusted? You should make sure your equipment is working properly before you go upgrading.

    Now, about upgrading. You can technically upgrade any bike you want...but I wouldn't recommend spending too much more on that particular frame. It's a low-end frame intended for "ATB and Comfort Riding", and the dual-suspension is really just a gimmick. If you upgraded the fork and brakes in order to do serious downhill and dirt-jumping, you'd break that frame so fast you wouldn't know what skewered you.

    Save your upgrade money until you can buy a new bike. Look around in your area for used bikes...if you talk to your local shop, and explain the sort of riding you'd like to do, they might be able to connect you with somebody else who may be selling their old rig.

    In the meantime, get those brakes adjusted, and stick with some basic cross-country trails, and keep building your skills.

  3. #3
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    I agree i had a mongoose black comb and i saved my money for a haro shift r3 and couldnt be happier with my new bike

  4. #4
    cycle dad
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    Sorry to revive a dead thread, but recently my buddy began building one of these s40 frames. He picked up some enduro bearings, a little fox coilover, and is adding a pile of decent components from his hardtail. I'll try to get a pic and post it up,
    Anyway, I was looking at the build, the welds, the geometry. This is actually a useable AM bike. I think the head angle is going to be around 71 if you stay true to the original axle-crown (he's going with a 130mm travel marzocchi so he's looking at a 68~ which might be more than the bike can handle). Regardless, I argue with the original advice given in this thread that you can't be sure it shouldn't be done until it skewers you.

    PS, the build up cost very little since he was building up a hardtail first and then switched it all over.

  5. #5
    cycle dad
    Reputation: taletotell's Avatar
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    This is what the bike looks like right out of the big box store
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #6
    Class Clown
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    i wouldn't trust that thing on the trails

  7. #7
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    Save the $$ for a big upgrade... a new bike... Look forward to something with front and rear disc brakes and lighter weight frame.
    2009 Access 9.5 29er
    2010 Diamondback Insight RS (700c hybrid)
    Velorazzo frame build (26)

  8. #8
    cycle dad
    Reputation: taletotell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hardwarz
    Save the $$ for a big upgrade... a new bike... Look forward to something with front and rear disc brakes and lighter weight frame.
    The frame is comparable to most fs frames for weight. It has front and rear disc, and he already spent the money on upgrading his hard tail, he's just switching parts over. There is no money into this except a 15 bucks for a cheap shock and a little more for the enduro bearings for the pivot.
    The welds are the classic machine welds you would see on a specialized so it should be plenty strong for the trails.

    If he wants to he can buy a nice frame for a few hundred down the road and switch everything over. In the end with a new frame he'd have a better bike than what most people spend 2 grand for. This is just an experiment.
    Saving money is a non-point here.

  9. #9
    Former Bike Wrench
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    Your friend will quickly learn why high single pivot designs are all but extinct in the bike world (department store bikes not withstanding)...especially without any kind of platform damper.

  10. #10
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    How did he get rear disc brakes on that bike? It has V brake bosses in the rear and no disc mounts.
    2009 Access 9.5 29er
    2010 Diamondback Insight RS (700c hybrid)
    Velorazzo frame build (26)

  11. #11
    cycle dad
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Your friend will quickly learn why high single pivot designs are all but extinct in the bike world (department store bikes not withstanding)...especially without any kind of platform damper.
    Single pivot is still one of the most common designs. There are maybe 6 major companies that do a floating pivot like DW or Maestro on SOME of their bikes, among them Ibis, Pivot, Intense, Santa Cruz, Giant.

    Companies that that still use single pivot designs include Specialized, Santa Cruz, Jamis, Canondale, Knolly, Commencal, Orange, Kona, Trek and most other high end bikes.

    I think most people don't know what single pivot means. It means the axle path is circular and is determined by a single pivot point. Other points are there to change leverage ratios mostly.

    As for lack of a platform damper, his coilover shock will ensure linear travel. It won't be too bad.

    Also, It has disc brake bosses on it. I don't know why the pictured one doesn't. He actually ground off the bosses for v brakes and is putting his halo freedom disc wheelset on it.

  12. #12
    Kahuna
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    For the rear disk question. I bought this bike as my first as I was getting starting serious about riding had all the components I liked and wanted to get used to before making a big investment. Disk brake and duel shocks. I took it to my LBS and told them I wanted rear disk and there is mounts on the frame for them they took the V brake off and gave me a compareable disk brake. Very goood bike IMO to get you into the sport with out braking the bank.

  13. #13
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    Schwinn makes some good bikes and have been in the business for many years. However, the S-40 is not on Schwinn's website and I couldn't find any good spec's online just vague generalizations. I found that its an aluminum frame but no listing was found on the grade of the aluminum or the weld spec. The bike is pretty heavy out of the box, a wopping 38lbs. Found that the MSRP was $389.99. The very low price of this full suspension beasty in addition to the hefty weight leads one to believe that the frame may not be made of the best materials. The Schwinns that are sold in the "big box" stores are of a very low price point but the quality of the bike reflects that price.

    I understand that price is an issue but there are a couple of things that I would suggest you do before you go through all of the work in transferring components. First, and most importantly, make sure that this bike doesn't have or had a sticker/decal/tag that states "Not for off road use." This is a dead give away that the frame is made of low quality material and could fail while riding. Secondly, replace the wheels. These bikes come with single wall wheels that will fail when riding off road. I saw a pic of a guy's bike on which the fork broke. It was a "big box" brand bike that he took out on a trail. Don't know how he ended up but by the time you finish paying the hospital off you probably could have afforded a carbon fiber 29'er with an XTR set up. Get my drift? Thirdly, have you thought about selling the S-40 as a complete bike and using that money towards a full-suspension frame only to transfer your hardtail components to?

    Good luck to ya and I hope everything works out.

    Thal

  14. #14
    cycle dad
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    It is not originally intended for off-road use. We saw the sticker. We are intentionally risking his life. This really isn't about cost. It is largly for the joy of the experiment
    This is only a frame. His wheels are halo freedom disc with spin doctor hubs.
    We aren't total novices. He is an engineering studen in his third year and we all have some experience with bike building and design. The welds are machine welds and look identical to any asian manufactured frame. I personally worry about the head busting from the strain of a longer fork, or the pivot weld busting from the strain of light-FR style riding. He is aware of these concerns and is still moving forward.
    One thing to keep in mind is that the DiamondBack Coil EX is pretty much a pacific bike too (not the Recoil, that is a real DB.) and my friend just rode one all day at Diablo on opening day, and went bigger and rode better than a lot of people there on dedicated DH and FR bikes. Cheap frames are often stronger than you think.
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