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  1. #1
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    Saddle positioned incorrectly?

    I just started riding and didn't notice this as much at first. However, last night, I took a pretty extensive trip offroad on some local singletrack and loved it. When I finished, though, I found that my crotch was very numb. Totally new meaning to the term numbnutts.

    I'm assuming this isn't normal, because if people's balls went numb when they rode, they'd either find a way to stop it, or quit riding. Is it possibly the positioning of my saddle, or am I riding incorrectly? I had biking liners on underneath my shorts, and they padded very well. No complaints there. I know I'm probably going to catch hell in this post, but really need suggestions on what might be causing it.

  2. #2
    Stokeless Asshat
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    You wont catch hell from us. The saddle should be positioned so that you sits bones take most of the pressure. Pretty simple actually. Google Cycling-penal numbness. You're not alone.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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  3. #3
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    It could be one thing, or it could be a combination of things, and to be honest, there is always going to be the possibility of some discomfort. It will take a bit of time for your posterior to get used to a bike saddle, and some saddles will never be OK for you.

    Everyone experiences some discomfort when starting out.

    It takes longer for some than others to get used to it.

    Saddle comfort is a personal thing. What works for some may not work for others..

    Saddle adjustment may take a while to find what works for you, but there are some guidelines for a starting point. After that, you'll have to make small incremental adjustments to get it dialed for you. A quarter inch can make a significant difference sometimes.

    Numbness in other extremeties can sometimes be traced to poor saddle adjustment.

    Beginning riders often prefer wider saddles until they get used to riding longer distances.

    Don't buy a gel saddle cover or even a cushy gel saddle. They can actually make the problem worse as they cut off circulation in a larger area.

    If you ride two or more times a week, and it doesn't start to improve after a month, you might consider a different saddle. Many shops have 'test saddles' for you to try so you don't have to shell out for a saddle you may not like.

    But, before you think about a saddle, it's a good idea to give your existing saddle a chance, and in the mean time, post up a pic of your bike from the side if you can. Maybe there will something glaringly obvious.

  4. #4
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    Here's a picture of the bike. It's only a week old, and I've ridden around the neighborhood on the road more than offroad. I rode back in the woods and down a powerline the other day with no problems. However, on the trail, prolonged on the bike for around 2 hours, the numbness kicked in. It wasn't in my rear...it was strictly in my testicles. Not trying to be too graphic, but when your boys go numb, you need to pay attention and fix the problem. If anything stands out to you from the position of my seat, I'm open to suggestions. Maybe tilt it one way or the other?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Saddle positioned incorrectly?-img_0793.jpg  


  5. #5
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    looks like it might be sloping back a bit. does your saddle have a V in the middle or hole?

    take a look at this:
    Specialized - Technology

    Are you sitting down all the time?

  6. #6
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    It has a slight V in the middle, but no hole. It's the stock MTB Rocket V that came with the bike. WTB » Products - Saddles - Racing - Rocket V

    I ride mostly sitting down, but not all the time. I've read that you get more out of your cadence in a seated postion, so I only stand up when I think it improves the stability of the bike: coming over jumps, cruising in tighter spaces between trees, etc. Otherwise, I tend to stay in the saddle, and have been trying to master my gearing through different terrain and through climbs and descents. If that's incorrect, please feel free to correct me. I'm trying to learn.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dundundata View Post
    looks like it might be sloping back a bit. does your saddle have a V in the middle or hole?

    take a look at this:
    Specialized - Technology

    Are you sitting down all the time?
    Just what I was thinking....

    I had the same problem years ago, you really have to experiment with fore n aft rail adjustment and the tilt till ya find your ''sweet spot''
    "Ya can't argue logic with ignorance.''

  8. #8
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    assuming the rest of the bike is properly fitted? grab a hex wrench and take a long ride, the twins are numb? make small adjustments to the angle until right, I have a WTB that is good for me, pure v model. other consideration is pedaling efficiency that typically is adjusted by seat post height and position of rails on post.I suggest looking for info online with detailed info on how to adjust saddle.Your knees should be about inline with the cleat/pedal. Very complicated, take your time, sometimes a saddle just sucks no matter what even if you have it perfectly adjusted and your arse has acclimated to the saddle after a few weeks.numb nuts are unacceptable.some folks pay for a custom fitting.

  9. #9
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    try putting a level on top of the seat, it should be within a few degrees of level. it might also be a tiny bit too high for you.

  10. #10
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    Others have already said it but....

    at the risk of being redundant, I'll repeat it. You need to tilt the nose of that saddle down a bit until it is level. My guess is "the boys' will thank you.

    Let us know how you make out.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  11. #11
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    Indeed, a picture is worth a thousand words. I would have numb-nads if my saddle was like that, but OTOH I have seen worse and riders claim they like it like that It does look like the saddle is pointed up too far (at least for my liking). I would put a level across the highest part of both ends and make it level - as a starting point. Adjust in small increments from there.

    The fore / aft position looks OK for now. The saddle looks to be at about the same height as the bars, or maybe a little lower. That could be about right, but it does make me wonder if the height is optimum for you.

    I would measure your 'cycling inseam' (with your riding shoes on) by taking a book and pressing it up into your undercarriage and then measuring from the highest part to the floor. Take that measurement, and multiply it by .883 and put the top of the saddle that far from a pedal in the 6 o'clock position. OR, adjust the height so you can just put your heel on the pedal in the 6 o'clock position. Remember, these are starting point recommendations and you can make small adjustments from there. . . . or do whatever you want. These recs are, of course, JMHO.

  12. #12
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    As the others have said, I would highly recommend leveling that saddle. You don't need a bubble level to do it, but if you want to use one that's fine too. Just loosen the binder and tilt it till it looks level. Use a level saddle as a starting point and go from there. Ride it and see if that works. If not you can make minor adjustments from there. Just make sure you make SMALL adjustments. Any tilt, fore or aft, of as little as a half degree can make a big difference. As previously noted it can take some time to get the adjustment just right. From the picture though getting that saddle leveled out is the place to start.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  13. #13
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    Leveling the saddle...

    In addition to a level, I'll place a clip board on the saddle to make it easier to place the level.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

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