1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    saddle position on rails

    i am having a lot of difficulty finding the proper seating position on my bike. it seems the only way for me to be reasonably comfortable is to have the saddle as far back as possible (on the rails) . this will no doubt break a rail prematurely, but it seems to be the only adjustment that works for me. does this mean that my bike is too small for me (i'm 6"2.5 and my frame is a gf xl)? any suggestions would be greatly appreciated . and if it is that the frame is too small, what would be the cheapest solution to my problem without getting a new bike/frame. thanks

    ps. my seatpost is at the proper height

  2. #2
    There's no app for this.
    Reputation: JimC.'s Avatar
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    it's key to

    keep your weight centred and balanced; that said, it might work to get a layback seatpost and a slightly longer stem.

    here's one on sale and I chose Thomson as it's recognized as bombproof, and you're a larger rider: http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgur...%3Den%26sa%3DG

    Hope that helps, but keep focused on the TT length of you ride, that's the cockpit, and it has to fit you correctly to find comfort and proper fit, which in turn puts a grin on your face.

    Good luck, Jim

  3. #3
    ...the wave won't brek
    Reputation: anthrax's Avatar
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    If you are not comfortable with the seat that far back, take a look at set back seat posts and/or a longer stem.

    I would try one, then the other, then both if you have to.

    The hardest part about dialing in a bike is the fact that it is all trial and error. So it can be kinda expensive (unless you have a good relationship with the local bike shop).

    I have the opposite problem to you I am short...

    As a result I needed to shorten up my cockpit length, so I needed to move my seat forward, and shorten my stem.

    Getting you bike to fit right just takes time and patents.

    I found it helped to keep detailed records while I was dialing my bike in of all of the before and after positions that I tired and which position I liked best and why.

    Remember when you are dialing in a bike make small changes many times, and if you don't like the change change it back.

    Good Luck,

    A
    2008 Santa Cruz Superlight SPX-XC Kit

    2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR-XC Comp

    2006 Specialized Allez Sport Double

  4. #4
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    thanks jim and anthrax, your posts were a great help . i will definitely look into those layback seat posts, and stems
    Last edited by foggy222; 04-26-2007 at 08:37 AM.

  5. #5
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    You must be one of those long femured guys! I also had the same issue with saddle postion on an XL Gary Fisher Sugar and a 23" El Capitan, being 6'3" tall with a 36" inseam. Ideally, your knee should be directly above the pedal when the crank is in the 3 o’clock position. Of course, this varies with rider preference and style.

    On my GF (25.5" top tube), the saddle was shoved all the way back, but replacing the straight seatpost with a Thomsen Setback Seatpost would have clamped the rails nearer the center and allowed me to move the saddle back a bit more if necessary. The El Capitan (25.3" top tube) already came with a Thomsen Setback seatpost. This saddle was also shoved back as far as possible, but another 1/2" or so farther back would have been perfecto. Replaced the Thomsen seatpost with a Titec El Norte Bent seatpost, with a 1 1/2" setback, for about $40.00…much nicer fit! The thing to keep in mind with the Titec Bent is that it’s going to stick out above the seatpost at least 6” because it can’t be installed lower than that due to the bend.

  6. #6
    Takw/agranofsalt
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    You will most likely bend the rails before they break so I wouldn't worrk too much about it. You should maybe look into an SDG I-Beam seat and post, they have much more fore/aft adjustment than most traditional railed seats.

  7. #7
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    With your sit bones on the saddle in the right place your knees should be within a couple a of cms directly above your pedal at the 3 oclock position.

    Then its a matter of either rolling your bars forward, or increasing the stem length to get a comfortable position.

    If the bike gets too twichty (longer stem) then you need a bigger frame top tube length.

    I ride with my saddle quite far back and a longish stem 120mm. I have a long torso.

  8. #8
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    thanks for the replies everyone, great info.

  9. #9
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    With your sit bones on the saddle in the right place your knees should be within a couple a of cms directly above your pedal at the 3 oclock position.
    Yup,
    the KOPS rule: knee over pedal spindle. That is a good starting point for a seat position that is good for pedaling efficiency and your knees.

    Is your seat at a suitable height?

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